• preventable
  • The majority of media attention, however, focused on the staggering statistics: from 44,000 to 98,000 preventable deaths annually due to medical error in hospitals, 7,000 preventable deaths related to medication errors alone. (wikipedia.org)
  • A 2000 Institute of Medicine report estimated that medical errors result in between 44,000 and 98,000 preventable deaths and 1,000,000 excess injuries each year in U.S. hospitals. (wikipedia.org)
  • According to the study, 400,000 preventable drug-related injuries occur each year in hospitals, 800,000 in long-term care settings, and roughly 530,000 among Medicare recipients in outpatient clinics. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2016
  • Ontario's auditor general found in 2016 that overcrowding in hospitals was a major problem , compromising the health not just of the patients forced to receive care in hallways, but of all admitted patients due to the higher risk of infections. (huffingtonpost.ca)
  • 1985
  • Household survey data indicated that by 1985 most urban families owned two bicycles, at least one sofa, a writing desk, a wardrobe, a sewing machine, an electric fan, a radio, and a television. (wikipedia.org)
  • 24,000
  • In 2004, the Canadian Adverse Events Study found that adverse events occurred in more than 7% of hospital admissions, and estimated that 9,000 to 24,000 Canadians die annually after an avoidable medical error. (wikipedia.org)
  • rural and urban
  • A new study published in the journal Medical Care reveals that the number of unnecessary cesarean sections and other potentially risky obstetric procedures differ significantly between rural and urban hospitals in the United States. (medindia.net)
  • This analysis indicates that women giving birth in rural and urban hospitals may experience different childbirth-related benefits and risks," according to Dr Kozhimannil and coauthors. (medindia.net)
  • The improvements in the standard of living were demonstrated by a boom in rural and urban housing, together with a considerable increase in the ownership of televisions and other appliances. (wikipedia.org)
  • patients
  • Services like surgery and obstetrics are being packed up and moved wholesale to urban centres, forcing rural patients to travel long distances to access care. (huffingtonpost.ca)
  • After all, when they "merge" with a smaller hospital they get to help themselves to an entire department's worth of equipment, staff and patients. (huffingtonpost.ca)
  • A single bad flu season was enough to push Ottawa hospitals up to 120 per cent capacity, forcing sick patients into hallways, storage rooms and wherever a stretcher or gurney could possibly fit. (huffingtonpost.ca)
  • Not only does this severely hamper the ability of a hospital to manage a public health crisis, it also puts patients at higher risk of illnesses like hospital-borne infections. (huffingtonpost.ca)
  • If small hospitals no longer have the ability to care for acutely ill patients close to home and large hospitals are permanently a hair's breadth away from overcapacity, where will people go when the next public health crisis happens? (huffingtonpost.ca)
  • The government's response to allegations of chronic hospital underfunding is that they have been putting money into community supports to keep patients out of the hospital. (huffingtonpost.ca)
  • Presumably, the cuts to direct federal money for these hospitals should be balanced by a decrease in uninsured patients. (dmiblog.com)
  • Patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) admitted to rural hospitals in the United States have a greater chance of dying during their hospital stay than patients admitted to urban hospitals for the same condition, according to a new report in HeartRhythm . (elsevier.com)
  • The analysis employed a cross-sectional examination of the NIS database of AF hospitalizations between 2012 and 2014 to determine if admission to a rural hospital was associated with an increased risk of in-hospital mortality compared with patients admitted to urban hospitals. (elsevier.com)
  • Looking at death due to any cause during hospitalization of patients with AF, the study found that patients admitted to rural hospitals had a 17 percent increased risk of death during hospitalization compared with urban hospitals. (elsevier.com)
  • Since we have identified rural hospitals as locations where in-hospital mortality for atrial fibrillation admission is possibly higher than other areas of the country, our findings will drive future research endeavors to uncover the reasons for this difference, and to develop strategies to improve the medical care for patients with this heart rhythm disturbance," Dr. O'Neal concluded. (elsevier.com)
  • The 'Top Hospital' designation, which is the most competitive national hospital quality award in the country, recognizes hospitals that deliver the highest quality care by preventing medical errors, reducing mortality for high-risk procedures, and reducing hospital readmissions for patients being treated for conditions like pneumonia and heart attack. (sys-con.com)
  • The costs of urban hospitals are influenced by case mix, wages, competition, the ratio of forecasted to actual admissions, teaching, and the percentage of patients admitted through the emergency room. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • At Weiss Memorial Hospital, various medical specialty services are provided through partnerships and contracts to achieve the best comprehensive care for patients. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Siloam Hospitals Group, which operates 20 hospitals in the country, is planning to provide facilities for JKN patients in the same premises as its private provision. (wikipedia.org)
  • patient
  • Funny thing, while the government was overseeing small hospitals losing their services to urban centres, they never bothered to proportionately increase the capacity of the hospitals that are now facing ever-increasing patient loads. (huffingtonpost.ca)
  • And at one Houston public hospital district, officials predict undocumented immigrants will become the largest patient pool as the newly insured move to other hospitals. (dmiblog.com)
  • The session, 'Enhanced Patient Experience-Design Driver for Urban Hospital-Based Ambulatory Care', explored some of the processes. (healthcaredesignmagazine.com)
  • Nurses form the largest group of the workforce in hospitals and as such the quality of nursing care is a critical indicator of patient satisfaction. (uwi.edu)
  • To determine the level of patient satisfaction with nursing care in the emergency department of an urban teaching hospital in Jamaica. (uwi.edu)
  • By achieving the Top Hospital accolade, Swedish/First Hill has demonstrated exemplary performance across all areas of quality and patient safety that are analyzed on the Leapfrog Hospital Survey. (sys-con.com)
  • Selection is based on results of The Leapfrog Group's national survey that measures hospitals' performance in crucial areas of patient safety and quality. (sys-con.com)
  • The impact of hospital market structure on patient volume, average length of stay, and the cost of care. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • medical
  • As a child, Bishop Douglas Miles heard the warnings about vans trolling East Baltimore streets, snatching up young African-Americans for medical experiments at nearby Johns Hopkins Hospital. (wisc.edu)
  • Rates of non-indicated (for no medical reason) cesarean section were 16.9 percent at rural hospitals and 17.8 percent at urban hospitals. (medindia.net)
  • SEATTLE , Dec. 4, 2012 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The Leapfrog Group's annual class of 'Top Hospitals' - just 89 from a field of nearly 1,200 - will be announced today in Baltimore, Md. , and includes Swedish Medical Center/First Hill for the third year in a row. (sys-con.com)
  • The bulk of the higher costs in urban hospitals are linked to graduate medical education. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • Snell encouraged the integration of local workers in the mission hospital, stating in one report: "Let us take into partnership with us the people among whom and for whom we are working and co-operate with them to establish medical standards. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Soochow Hospital, which was also a medical school, was established in 1883 by Dr. Walter Russell Lambuth and Dr. William Hector Park. (wikipedia.org)
  • The medical school had a variety of notable graduates, including Yang Vee Yuer, who became the superintendent of the Soochow Hospital and a professor at Soochow University. (wikipedia.org)
  • care
  • Sometimes you need the kind of care that only a hospital provides. (huffingtonpost.ca)
  • After years of austerity in hospital and physician funding and redirection of money towards home care, shouldn't that percentage have increased? (huffingtonpost.ca)
  • It appears it's possible to spin the effect of health care reform on local hospitals either way. (dmiblog.com)
  • This method supports programs of care that cross hospital and practice settings, reduces duplication, and allows greater integration with hospital-based resources. (healthcaredesignmagazine.com)
  • Satisfaction with nursing care in the emergency department of an urban hospital in the developing world: A pilot study. (uwi.edu)
  • This hospital stands out as one consistently providing safe, high-quality care," said Leah Binder , president and CEO of The Leapfrog Group. (sys-con.com)
  • The survey focuses on three critical areas of hospital care: 1. (sys-con.com)
  • In each of these three areas, Leapfrog asks hospitals to report on nationally standardized measures so health-care consumers can compare hospitals in their community and across the country. (sys-con.com)
  • Beginning in July 2012, Weiss Memorial Hospital joined the other four Tenet Hospitals in Chicago as an Accountable care organization, part of the Center for Medicare and Medicaid's Shared Savings Program. (wikipedia.org)
  • Year
  • After adjustment for these factors, the increase in non-indicated induction of labor occurred faster at rural hospitals: by five percent per year, compared to four percent per year at urban hospitals. (medindia.net)
  • While numerous agencies and organizations collect and publicize hospital quality data, the Leapfrog Hospital Survey, now in its twelfth year, is the toughest standard-bearer and provides the most complete picture of a hospital's quality and safety. (sys-con.com)
  • When Snell first arrived, Park, the head doctor at the hospital at the time, had just left on furlough for a year. (wikipedia.org)
  • surgeon
  • John Abner Snell (28 October 1880 - 2 March 1936), also known as Soo E. Sang, was a missionary surgeon and hospital administrator in Suzhou (Soochow), China. (wikipedia.org)
  • public
  • Public hospitals are bracing for potential cuts that could cost them billions in federal safety-net dollars. (dmiblog.com)
  • And the Broward-Palm Beach New Times ponders whether the expansion of coverage to 32 million uninsured will make public hospitals obsolete. (dmiblog.com)
  • Undocumented immigrants are ineligible to receive coverage under the federal plan, but public hospitals take in emergencies regardless of immigration status. (dmiblog.com)
  • Congress should turn its attention to immigration reform to ensure that urban public hospitals don't continue to struggle under a broken system. (dmiblog.com)
  • Population
  • The 2011 Census recorded the borough's total resident population as 138,400 and the wider urban settlement with a population of 174,700 technically making Middlesbrough the largest urban subdivsion in the ceremonial county of North Yorkshire. (wikipedia.org)
  • emergency department
  • Criteria that seek to measure the effectiveness of hospital emergency department operations could be disadvantageous to large urban hospitals, according to a recent report. (nauh.org)
  • New "throughput" measures endorsed by the National Quality Forum fail to reflect the different conditions that large urban hospitals face, according to the article "Exogenous Predictors of National Performance Measures for Emergency Department Crowding," published recently in the Annals of Emergency Medicine . (nauh.org)
  • physicians
  • With numbers this low, Ontario's physicians are left wondering how our large hospitals will handle the next flu crisis. (huffingtonpost.ca)
  • The Women's Health Center at Weiss Hospital has a team of physicians that focus on urological gynecology, gynecological oncology, full fertility services, advanced laparoscopy and general surgery. (wikipedia.org)
  • Physicians affiliated with the Eye Surgery Center at Weiss Memorial Hospital include ophthalmologists in academics as well as private practice. (wikipedia.org)
  • million
  • The recent provincial budget announcement of $518 million in hospital-directed funds was also spun as new investment , but the reality is that this money only covers inflation and does nothing to reverse the trend of bed shortages. (huffingtonpost.ca)
  • The study included approximately 6.3 million births at urban hospitals and 840,000 at rural hospitals. (medindia.net)
  • decrease
  • In addition, the outlier threshold for all hospitals to be eligible for extra payments for unusually costly cases will decrease from $31,000 to $30,150. (healthimaging.com)
  • time
  • The article noted that evaluating hospital ER operations based on measures such as waiting time and length of stay fails to reflect circumstances and conditions beyond hospitals' control. (nauh.org)
  • Coincidentally, Dr. Walter Lambuth, the Missionary Secretary of the Methodist Episcopal Church, who started the hospital where Snell would go on to work in Soochow, China, was on the advisory committee of the Student Volunteer Movement at the time. (wikipedia.org)
  • university
  • The "Jesus Walks" rapper, 39, was taken to the Resnick Neuropsychiatric Hospital at the University of California, Los Angeles, last week after police responded to a call for help, several media outlets reported. (urban96.fm)
  • The hospital where Snell once worked, now The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, is still considered one of the best in the region. (wikipedia.org)
  • article
  • This article examines factors accounting for higher costs in urban hospitals as well as their relative contribution to those costs. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • this reference currently covers the entire article) Allegheny General Hospital website West Penn Allegheny Health System website "Pennsylvania Trauma Systems Foundation Trauma Center Accreditation Granted to One Additional Hospital in Pennsylvania" (PDF). (wikipedia.org)
  • head doctor
  • Between 1945 and 1948 Helga Wittbrodt was employed as a senior doctor, and then as head doctor, at the "Urban" City Hospital in Berlin's Tempelhof quarter (in the "American sector" of Berlin). (wikipedia.org)