• inpatient
  • Mt. Washington Pediatric Hospital became the first children's hospital in Maryland accredited for comprehensive inpatient rehab, infant and early childhood development and respite care. (wikipedia.org)
  • The facility treats children with injuries and illnesses including, but not limited to: Brain injuries Burns Complications from prematurity Complications from obesity Neuromuscular diseases Orthopedic injuries Ventilator dependency Paralysis The facility includes: 34 inpatient pediatric beds, therapy gym and aqua therapy pool, developmental testing and child-centered activity areas, computer center, art therapy room, music and movement room, life skills kitchen, and a fully accessible playground both indoor and outdoor. (wikipedia.org)
  • improves
  • Future studies should investigate whether bedside training improves CPR quality during actual pediatric arrests. (laerdal.com)
  • The Catholic Church established a hospital system in Medieval Europe that vastly improves from the merely reciprocal hospitality of the Greeks and family-based obligations of the Romans. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2002
  • It was re-named the Dr. Gaafar Ibnauf Specialized Hospital in 2002 in an official ceremony attended by head of state Omar al-Bashir. (wikipedia.org)
  • health
  • When the vaccine made its debut in October, public health officials took advantage of such hospitals' unique ability to reach many of the highest-risk groups with the first doses. (umn.edu)
  • The hospital is managed by the Ministry of Health. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mt. Washington Pediatric Hospital is a 102-bed non-profit children's hospital set in the scenic neighborhood of Mt. Washington in Baltimore that provides long-term care for children with complex health problems. (wikipedia.org)
  • The inauguration of the project of the Jafar Ibn Auf Hospital took place in 1977 under the supervision of Professor Gaafar Ibnauf Suliman and the Sudanese Ministry of health, with assistance from UNICEF. (wikipedia.org)
  • Children are admitted by referrals from other pediatric health care facilities and from children's hospitals. (wikipedia.org)
  • Since the Flint Water Crisis, she also became the director of the Pediatric Public Health Initiative, a partnership between Hurley Medical Center and Michigan State University, to optimize the outcomes of Flint children. (wikipedia.org)
  • Through community and clinical programs, childhood health policy and advocacy, and robust evaluation, the Pediatric Public Health Initiative works with many partners, including Flint's heroic parents and kids, as a center of excellence, with the primary goal of mitigating the impact of the Flint Water Crisis and serving as a national resource for best practices. (wikipedia.org)
  • A hospital system or health care system is 2 or more hospitals owned, sponsored, or contract managed by a central organization. (wikipedia.org)
  • Eastern Health - 7 hospitals. (wikipedia.org)
  • JPS Health Network - Tarrant County, Texas - 1 hospital. (wikipedia.org)
  • New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation - 11 hospitals, 4 nursing homes, 70 primary care sites. (wikipedia.org)
  • Parkland Health & Hospital System - Dallas County, Texas - 1 hospital. (wikipedia.org)
  • Private: Adventist Health System - 45 hospitals. (wikipedia.org)
  • Aurora Health Care - The system has 13 hospitals, over 100 clinics, and more than 80 community pharmacies. (wikipedia.org)
  • Child Health Corporation of America - 42 pediatric hospitals. (wikipedia.org)
  • Continuum Health Partners (merged with Mount Sinai Health Center in 2013) - 4 hospitals in New York City. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mount Sinai Health System - 7 member hospitals, 6 affiliate hospitals, 4 affiliate nursing home and long term care facilities, hundreds of clinical relationships throughout the greater New York City area NewYork-Presbyterian Healthcare System - 30 hospitals. (wikipedia.org)
  • Northwell Health - 16 hospitals. (wikipedia.org)
  • Steward Health Care System - 36 community hospitals in ten states that employ approximately 37,000 people and regularly receives top awards for quality and safety. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is the primary teaching hospital for East Carolina University's Brody School of Medicine and is the flagship medical center for Vidant Health. (wikipedia.org)
  • Program
  • In 2005, the innovative Weigh Smart® program was added as a multi-disciplinary and holistic approach to pediatric weight management. (wikipedia.org)
  • Marketed as the BreathEasy program, the hospital provides participants with the smartphone application and a snap-on sensor that tracks how often participants use their asthma inhaler. (wikipedia.org)
  • Director
  • When the first novel H1N1 cases were identified in Mexico and California in late April, she said hospital administrators anticipated a possible pandemic and put a strategic team in place, led by the director of infection prevention and the director of safety. (umn.edu)
  • Patsy Stinchfield, NP, director of infectious disease/immunology and infection prevention at Children's Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota, is a veteran of many disease threats, including measles, SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome), and smallpox, but she says pandemic flu stands apart. (umn.edu)
  • Dr. Wilfred H. Smith, Director of Johns Hopkins Hospital, wrote to trustees: "Happy Hills has met a real need in Baltimore. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hospital director Roger Levering is resistant to quarantining the facility for fear of causing a panic, but Rachel is at least able to get him to bring in entomologist Elliot Jacobs in the hopes of identifying the mysterious insect. (wikipedia.org)
  • clinics
  • Jan 5, 2010 (CIDRAP News) - In early August 2009, when the pandemic virus started tearing through southern states where schools had already started, the pandemic preparedness team at Children's Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota felt a sense of foreboding that the virus was poised to strike the area a second time. (umn.edu)
  • After the spring flu wave died down, Children's Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota conducted tabletop exercises to help test and tweak its pandemic response plan. (umn.edu)
  • center
  • Wyckoff Heights Medical Center is a 350-bed teaching hospital located in the Wyckoff Heights section of Bushwick, Brooklyn in New York City. (wikipedia.org)
  • The hospital opened its doors in 1899 as the German Hospital of Brooklyn, but was renamed Wyckoff Heights Hospital after World War I because of anti-German sentiments and eventually renamed Wyckoff Heights Medical Center. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 2006 Wyckoff Heights Medical Center received top honors from HSS Incorporated (a medical coding software developer) for the hospital's medical coding practices, as part of the third-annual Top 200 Coding Hospital Report. (wikipedia.org)
  • McGaw Medical Center of Northwestern University is a consortium of hospitals. (wikipedia.org)
  • He carries additional hospital appointments at Englewood Hospital and Hackensack University Medical Center, both in New Jersey. (wikipedia.org)
  • Vidant Medical Center (previously, Pitt County Memorial Hospital) is a hospital located in Greenville, North Carolina. (wikipedia.org)
  • The UHS brand was taken, so the hospital system instead finally change its name to Vidant Medical Center. (wikipedia.org)
  • medical
  • For children with complex medical conditions such as brain injuries or complications due to premature birth, Ranken Jordan helps bridge the gap between traditional hospital treatment and the comforts of home. (wikipedia.org)
  • With an impressive staff of medical professionals and community volunteers, each child at Ranken Jordan is given individualized attention, so that a stay in the hospital offers all the growth and rewards of being raised at home. (wikipedia.org)
  • The hospital is an academic affiliate of the Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, the New York Medical College and New York Institute of Technology. (wikipedia.org)
  • Even though Hanna-Attisha was not provided the data she sought from the State of Michigan, she used hospital electronic medical records as data for her study. (wikipedia.org)
  • A year later, the hospital and the medical school signed a joint affiliation agreement. (wikipedia.org)
  • System
  • This was a good test for our system, and we functioned well," Hirschman said, adding that the hospital didn't run short on ventilators or other key equipment. (umn.edu)
  • facility
  • When Jim comes back clean of any mysterious parasitic insects Rachel decides to show him around the hospital, including their high-tech research facility where they're testing out new and powerful surgical lasers. (wikipedia.org)
  • The facility was originally known as Pitt Community Hospital and was located near downtown Greenville. (wikipedia.org)
  • surgery
  • Advancements in pediatric general surgery, cardiac surgery, and anesthesiology were also a driving factor in the development of the PICU. (wikipedia.org)
  • common
  • The most common treatment of atelectasis in the hospital setting is manual chest physiotherapy though there is limited evidence of its efficacy. (wikipedia.org)
  • year
  • The attack on the 16-year-old, which was thought to be racially inclined, took place in broad daylight and left the Foothill High School student in the hospital with limited ability to walk. (wikipedia.org)
  • community
  • In 1887 the German Hospital Society of Brooklyn was organized by the Plattdeutscher Volksfest-Verein for the purpose of raising funds, purchasing land, and constructing a hospital to serve the large German immigrant community in Brooklyn. (wikipedia.org)
  • Pitt Community Hospital (PCH), the precursor to Pitt County Memorial Hospital, was the vision of Greenville physician, Charles Laughinghouse. (wikipedia.org)