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  • medication
  • A summary of more common and reported cases of factitious disorder (Munchausen syndrome), and the laboratory tests used to differentiate these from authentic disease is provided below: There are several symptoms that together point to factitious disorder, including frequent hospitalizations, knowledge of several illnesses, frequently requesting medication such as pain killers, openness to extensive surgery, few or no visitors during hospitalizations, and exaggerated or fabricated stories about several medical problems. (wikipedia.org)
  • Psychiatrists may use therapy, medication, hospitalization, or a combination of these treatment options in the care of their patients. (dmoztools.net)
  • outcomes
  • In that way, our member's novel therapeutics, vaccines, and diagnostics not only have improved health outcomes, including productivity and quality of life, but also have reduced health care expenditures due to fewer physician office visits, hospitalizations and surgical interventions. (bio.org)
  • diagnosis
  • If the discharge is followed by readmission or direct transfer to an acute facility for a principal diagnosis of mental health within the 30-day follow-up period, count only the readmission discharge or the discharge from the facility to which the patient was transferred. (mdinteractive.com)
  • behavior
  • Behavioral therapy is descended from some ancient philosophical traditions, but took modern form in the ideas of Edward Thorndike, who coined the term "behavior modification" in 1911, and B.F. Skinner and his school, who showed that almost any kind of behavior could be changed with repeated practice. (steadyhealth.com)
  • CBT uses cognitive techniques to identify thoughts and feelings that cause distress and when acted upon can cause problematic behavior, and helps people think about them differently, as well as behavioral methods to train people in different and more effective ways to respond to difficult situations. (steadyhealth.com)
  • The Synactive Theory is the foundation of both: 1) the Assessment of Preterm Infants' Behavior (APIB), a standardized comprehensive newborn test, and 2) the Newborn Individualized Developmental Care and Assessment Program (NIDCAP), which is the care and intervention approach, that focuses on each infant's behavioral cues (e.g., hand(s) to mouth, bracing with feet against a supporting surface) in order to support the infant's strengths and reduce the infant's vulnerabilities. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Dialectal Behavior Therapy and Behaviorism are widely used approaches for addressing Process Addictions and Substance Addictions. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] In 2007 the hospital opened the Gerald & Jane-Ann Postma Center for Worship and Education, a $3.7 million training center targeted at nursing, behavior health and pastoral students and Pine Rest staff members. (wikipedia.org)
  • This behavior has the potential to aid an individual's capability for suicide and can be considered as a suicide warning, when the person shows intent through verbal and behavioral signs. (wikipedia.org)
  • programs
  • South Florida behavioral health programs are planning a significant expansion in the near future to fill a gap in community resources. (prweb.com)
  • See related articles titled " Proposed Rule Protects Patients From Discriminatory Policies " and " HHS Proposes Incentives for Nondiscriminatory Wellness Programs in Group Health Plan . (apta.org)
  • Other individual market changes include health marketplaces and risk adjustment programs. (wikipedia.org)
  • suicide
  • This is particularly helpful in military situations, during medical hospitalizations and for the prevention of threatening suicide. (steadyhealth.com)
  • The average life expectancy of people with the disorder is shorter than those without it, due to increased physical health problems from an absence of health promoting behaviors such as a sedentary lifestyle,[citation needed] and a higher suicide rate. (wikipedia.org)
  • Suicide prevention is an umbrella term for the collective efforts of local citizen organizations, health professionals and related professionals to reduce the incidence of suicide. (wikipedia.org)
  • Because protective factors such as social support and social engagement, as well as environmental risk factors such as access to lethal means, appear to play significant roles in the prevention of suicide, suicide should not be viewed solely as a medical or mental health issue. (wikipedia.org)
  • Suicide prevention is risky for health professionals in terms of practitioner emotional distress and risk for malpractice suits. (wikipedia.org)
  • The traditional approach has been to identify the risk factors that increase suicide or self-harm, though meta-analysis studies suggest that suicide risk assessment might not be useful and recommend immediate hospitalization of the person with suicidal feelings as the healthy choice. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1944
  • It amended the Public Health Service Act of 1944 and inserted new provisions on affordable care into Title 42 of the United States Code. (wikipedia.org)
  • exchanges
  • 2. A similar dynamic exists with the law's requirement that insurers selling policies through the health exchanges will no longer be able to charge different premiums based on a person's health status when coverage is first purchased. (washingtonpost.com)
  • A report in the June edition of Health Affairs found that "more than half of Americans who had individual insurance in 2010 were enrolled in plans that would not qualify as providing essential coverage under the rules of the exchanges in 2014. (washingtonpost.com)
  • In addition, the law provides premium tax credits - in the form of advance payments - to help eligible families and small businesses purchase health coverage through new insurance exchanges that will operate in each state, beginning in October. (mcclatchydc.com)
  • The proposed rule provides guidance to states on the essential health benefits (EHBs) that must be offered in most nongrandfathered qualified health plans (QHPs) that are offered in each state's affordable Health Insurance Exchanges ("Exchanges") as directed under the Affordable Care Act (ACA). (apta.org)
  • The Exchanges are expected to create competitive marketplaces making health insurance plans more affordable for individuals. (apta.org)
  • The essential health benefits are a minimum federal standard and "states may require that qualified health plans sold in state health insurance exchanges also cover state-mandated benefits. (wikipedia.org)
  • organization
  • During the session, Ms. Daugherty talked about the changes her organization, Emergence Health, made to position themselves in this market. (openminds.com)
  • The Synactive Theory of Newborn Behavioral Organization and Development (Synaction n., or Synactive adj. (wikipedia.org)
  • disorder
  • Cognitive emotional behavioral therapy is a more extended version of CBT, developed first for eating disorder patients but now used for many other conditions: patients or clients learn to evaluate why they experience distress and to reduce the need for dysfunctional behaviors like starving, binging, purging and abusing substances. (steadyhealth.com)
  • Schizoaffective disorder (SZA, SZD or SAD) is a mental disorder characterized by abnormal thought processes and deregulated emotions. (wikipedia.org)
  • Munchausen syndrome fits within the subclass of factitious disorder with predominantly physical signs and symptoms, but patients also have a history of recurrent hospitalization, travelling, and dramatic, extremely improbable tales of their past experiences. (wikipedia.org)
  • Major depressive disorder (MDD), also known simply as depression, is a mental disorder characterized by at least two weeks of low mood that is present across most situations. (wikipedia.org)
  • Major depressive disorder can negatively affect a person's personal, work, or school life, as well as sleeping, eating habits, and general health. (wikipedia.org)
  • insurance premiums
  • President Obama has embraced the phrase "Obamacare," once originally intended as an epithet by the heath-care law's opponents, but we were a bit surprised the other day when he declared that health insurance premiums were going to go down. (washingtonpost.com)
  • From 2000 to 2011, average annual health insurance premiums more than doubled for employers, from $4,819 to $10,944, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation. (rollcall.com)
  • problems
  • The current version of the BES contains 29 items that were constructed based on the verbatim reports of parents and children who were asked to describe the child's emotional and behavioral problems that were of most concern to them (see Weisz et al. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • The method can thus help to change moods and thoughts which are distressing and to change behavioral actions based on these moods and thoughts that can cause problems. (steadyhealth.com)
  • The federal health exchange, HealthCare.gov, initially faced major technical problems during its rollout in 2013. (wikipedia.org)
  • essential health benefits
  • These and other coverage areas are considered "essential health benefits" under the health care law. (mcclatchydc.com)
  • But choices made by state and federal policymakers in implementing the overhaul's "essential health benefits" requirements could make matters worse for small-group and individual health plans. (rollcall.com)
  • Allowing or requiring states to add mandated benefits or public-sector rules to the essential health benefits package without giving strong consideration to the added cost will further undermine the affordability of health coverage. (rollcall.com)
  • Neil Trautwein is vice president and employee benefits policy counsel at the National Retail Federation and chairman of the Essential Health Benefits Coalition. (rollcall.com)
  • Standards Related to Essential Health Benefits, Actuarial Value, and Accreditation. (apta.org)
  • Essential health benefits (EHBs) have been defined since the 2010 United States Affordable Care Act as a set of benefits which Individually purchased health insurance in the United States and insurance plans in small group markets, both inside and outside of the Health Insurance Marketplace must cover for people. (wikipedia.org)
  • Coverage of essential health benefits was first required by the 2010 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA or ACA), which was a major piece of health care reform legislation. (wikipedia.org)
  • The establishment of essential health benefits "set a standard for insurance. (wikipedia.org)
  • Revision and repeal of essential health benefits coverage was proposed in the Republican part American Health Care Act of 2017. (wikipedia.org)
  • Essential health benefits should not be confused with minimum essential coverage (MEC). (wikipedia.org)
  • law's
  • Unless a health plan is exempted from the health care law's requirements, "It will have to change to survive," Coleman said. (mcclatchydc.com)
  • The health care law's requirement that all citizens have insurance or pay a fine will increase competition among insurers, which will help lower premiums for individuals, according to the Congressional Budget Office. (mcclatchydc.com)
  • prescription
  • Indeed, current prescription drug coverage offered by small-group plans was found to be broader than the drug coverage HHS has said it intends to include in the essential benefits package, according to a January 2012 study by Avalere Health. (rollcall.com)
  • QHPs
  • MEC is the minimum amount of coverage that an individual must carry to meet the individual health insurance mandate, while EHBs are a set of benefits that qualified health plans (QHPs) must offer. (wikipedia.org)
  • depression
  • Play media Major depression significantly affects a person's family and personal relationships, work or school life, sleeping and eating habits, and general health. (wikipedia.org)
  • physical complaints are the most common presenting problem in developing countries, according to the World Health Organization's criteria for depression. (wikipedia.org)
  • Affordable Care Act
  • The 2010 Affordable Care Act (ACA) defines benefits which Individually purchased health insurance in the United States and insurance plans in small group markets, both inside and outside of the Health Insurance Marketplace must cover for people. (wikipedia.org)
  • program
  • Brafman is the founder and CEO of Destination Hope, Destination Hope: The Women's Program, and the Sylvia Brafman Mental Health Center, all located in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. (prweb.com)
  • A partial hospitalization program consists of a series of structured, face-to-face therapeutic sessions organized at various levels of intensity and frequency. (wikipedia.org)
  • premiums
  • 1. Currently insurance companies offer lower premiums to younger Americans, since they generally have lower health costs. (washingtonpost.com)
  • Premiums would be collected from Coloradans based on income, securing health care regardless of financial circumstance. (northdenvernews.com)
  • Lavarreda, director of health insurance studies for the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, explained that before the ACA's passage, U.S. health insurance sector experienced "a race to the bottom, with insurers cutting benefits to lower premiums. (wikipedia.org)
  • Psychiatry
  • Beginning in the 1980s, cognitive behavioral therapy was more commonly used in child psychiatry, as a source of intervention for troubled youth, and was applied in RTCs to produce better long-term results. (wikipedia.org)
  • Service
  • That was the focus of my session at the 2017 OPEN MINDS Executive Leadership Retreat, Diversifying Your Revenue Streams: How To Successfully Launch A New Service Line , featuring Kristi Daugherty, Chief Executive Officer at Emergence Health Network in El Paso, Texas. (openminds.com)
  • The EHB provisions of the ACA was an amendment to the Public Health Service Act. (wikipedia.org)
  • Advocacy
  • For a family of four that earns $35,000 a year, the tax credit protects them from spending more than 4 percent of their annual income for insurance, said Kathleen Stoll, the director of health policy at Families USA, a consumer health care advocacy group. (mcclatchydc.com)
  • patient
  • We believe this flexibility will allow for greater competition among health plans in every region, thereby increasing patient choice. (bio.org)
  • Center
  • Boulder County AIDS Project, in partnership with the Beacon Center for Infectious Disease, will be hosting a community forum to discuss ColoradoCare - the proposed resident-owned, non-governmental health care financing system on the ballot as Amendment 69. (northdenvernews.com)
  • Brafman is looking to build a larger campus in Broward County for Destination Hope and Sylvia Brafman Mental Health Center, and expects to double the number of employees over the next few years. (prweb.com)
  • In 2013, the Van Andel-Cook Center for Dementia and Geriatric Behavioral Health opened as part of a 3-phase expansion project on the Pine Rest main campus in Cutlerville. (wikipedia.org)
  • medical
  • This is an exciting opportunity to have your questions answered by a medical professional and expert on the proposed changes to how health care is provided to all Coloradans. (northdenvernews.com)
  • reform
  • Obama and the rest of the Marxist said, No matter how we reform health care, we will keep this promise to the American people. (usacarry.com)
  • emotional
  • a core component of DBT is learning new behavioral skills, including mindfulness, interpersonal effectiveness (e.g. assertiveness and social skill), coping adaptively with distress and crises, and identifying and regulating emotional reactions. (wikipedia.org)
  • The basic physical, mental, and emotional needs of young people and their families are recognized and addressed. (wikipedia.org)
  • Suicide prevention is risky for health professionals in terms of practitioner emotional distress and risk for malpractice suits. (wikipedia.org)
  • Friendship in adulthood provides companionship, affection, as well as emotional support, and contributes positively to mental well-being and improved physical health. (wikipedia.org)
  • suicidal
  • The traditional approach has been to identify the risk factors that increase suicide or self-harm, though meta-analysis studies suggest that suicide risk assessment might not be useful and recommend immediate hospitalization of the person with suicidal feelings as the healthy choice. (wikipedia.org)
  • Healthcare
  • NYAPRS Note: A coalition of NYS community-based primary care, home care, and behavioral healthcare service providers including NYAPRS have been working together to seek our fair share of a $2 billion state fund created from the sale of nonprofit health insurer Fidelis to for-profit Centene Corporation to address our full-scale workforce hiring and retention crisis. (nyaprs.org)
  • As the state has encouraged more health care to be provided in community settings, money should follow those policies, said Lauri Cole, executive director of the NYS Council for Community Behavioral Healthcare. (nyaprs.org)
  • severe
  • The authors noted an apparent superior efficacy of olanzapine to the other drugs in terms of reduction in psychopathology and rate of hospitalizations, but olanzapine was associated with relatively severe metabolic effects such as a major weight gain problem (averaging 9.4 lbs over 18 months) and increases in glucose, cholesterol, and triglycerides. (wikipedia.org)
  • A 2014 review of synthetic cannabinoids reported that acute intoxication with dronabinol led in some cases to emergency hospitalization, requiring supportive care, benzodiazepines, and fluid replacement, whereas more severe cases involved cardiotoxicity or psychosis, requiring hospitalization for as long as 2 weeks. (wikipedia.org)
  • psychiatry
  • Kellie Tamashiro, Ph.D., associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and M.D./Ph.D. student Seva Khambadkone, both of Johns Hopkins, and others divided a group of otherwise healthy rats into two groups: one received normal rat chow, and the other received both normal chow and a piece of store-bought, nitrate-prepared beef jerky every other day. (bphope.com)
  • Cameron began his training in psychiatry at the Glasgow Royal Mental Hospital in 1925. (wikipedia.org)
  • assessment
  • The Synactive Theory is the foundation of both: 1) the Assessment of Preterm Infants' Behavior (APIB), a standardized comprehensive newborn test, and 2) the Newborn Individualized Developmental Care and Assessment Program (NIDCAP), which is the care and intervention approach, that focuses on each infant's behavioral cues (e.g., hand(s) to mouth, bracing with feet against a supporting surface) in order to support the infant's strengths and reduce the infant's vulnerabilities. (wikipedia.org)
  • persistent
  • In her comments to the FDA after the agency proposed a rule in March 2007, Karen Ignagni, president and CEO of America's Health Insurance Plans (AHIP), pressed the agency to include a definition in the final rule that said, "A serious disease or condition is one which is persistent, substantially disabling, progressive, and likely to result in death within 6 to 12 months. (blogspot.com)
  • physical
  • In the United States, Marinol is a Schedule III drug, available by prescription, considered to be non-narcotic and to have a low risk of physical or mental dependence. (wikipedia.org)
  • flexibility
  • fluency and mental flexibility were low average to average. (docplayer.net)
  • Psychological flexibility has been found to improve mental health and absence rates. (wikipedia.org)
  • A longitudinal study on psychological flexibility and job control showed that these variables predicted workers' mental health, job performance, and even their ability to learn new software. (wikipedia.org)
  • The study demonstrates the power of psychological flexibility in the workplace as psychologically flexible workers have better mental health and job performance. (wikipedia.org)
  • risk
  • It can also put the individual and others at risk of fires, falling, poor sanitation, and other health concerns. (wikipedia.org)
  • Because protective factors such as social support and social engagement, as well as environmental risk factors such as access to lethal means, appear to play significant roles in the prevention of suicide, suicide should not be viewed solely as a medical or mental health issue. (wikipedia.org)
  • Risk and protective factors, unique to the individual can be assessed by a qualified mental health professional. (wikipedia.org)
  • group
  • St. Helena Hospital Napa Valley is operated by Adventist Health, a group of 19 hospitals in the western United States, and is located in the Napa Valley, California, between the town of St. Helena, and the community of Angwin, which is home to Pacific Union College. (wikipedia.org)
  • social
  • Community schools transform traditional public schools into partnerships for excellence by being a place where partnerships between educators, families, community volunteers, youth development organizations, and business, health, and social agencies, can come together. (wikipedia.org)
  • local
  • Suicide prevention is an umbrella term for the collective efforts of local citizen organizations, health professionals and related professionals to reduce the incidence of suicide. (wikipedia.org)
  • efforts
  • this model was used as the blueprint for similar efforts in Montreal and a forerunner of 1960s community health models. (wikipedia.org)
  • General efforts have included preventive and proactive measures within the realms of medicine and mental health, as well as public health and other fields. (wikipedia.org)
  • history
  • On July 3, 1946 President Harry Truman signed the National Mental Health Act which, for the first time in the history of the United States, generated a large amount of federal funding for both psychiatric education and research. (wikipedia.org)
  • chronic
  • She noted that schizophrenia and chronic depression are among the conditions that "cause disabling health effects and suffering for a period of time without death occurring prematurely or in a matter of months. (blogspot.com)