Loading...
  • outpatient
  • When iVantage compared costs for 10 common outpatient procedures, it found average rural costs were higher than the average urban costs for all analyzed procedures. (beckershospitalreview.com)
  • This cost could be reduced by shifting service provision to an outpatient basis, allowing service provision by midwives, and abandoning the use of D&C. Availability of safe, legal abortion would further decrease cost and reduce preventable deaths from unsafe abortion. (ipas.org)
  • Derby Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust runs Royal Derby Hospital and the London Road Community Hospital, (formerly Derbyshire Royal Infirmary), both in Derby, together with outpatient and diagnostic services in a range of community hospitals, health centres and GP surgeries across southern Derbyshire. (wikipedia.org)
  • patients
  • If the program, called the Admissions Scheduling and Control System, is a good a hospital administrators and federal officials say it is, it could provide a major tool for busy hospitals to handle more patients without expanding and for hospitals with high vacancy rates to close unneeded beds and reduce costs. (washingtonpost.com)
  • The purpose of the new system is to give a hospital a more stable patient population y reducing as much as possible fluctuations in the patient census by scheduling elective surgical and medical patients for admission at times when the hospital is being relatively under-used. (washingtonpost.com)
  • The trick for a crowded hospital like Greater Southeast is to find a way to bring in more nonemergency patients while still maintaining enough empty beds to accommodate the less predictable emergency admissions that will be coming in. (washingtonpost.com)
  • When researchers analyzed data on more than 14,000 patients, they found that postoperative respiratory complications help drive up these health care costs. (facs.org)
  • Study results showed that total inpatient costs were 4 percent higher for current smokers compared with patients who never smoked. (facs.org)
  • The same was not true for former smokers, for whom costs were not statistically significant compared with patients who never smoked. (facs.org)
  • After factoring in the complexity of the operation, researchers found that hospital costs for smokers who had more complex procedures were 6 percent higher compared with hospital costs for patients who never smoked. (facs.org)
  • Yet, a hospital-based study found that patients who want to participate in their medical decisions end up spending more time in the hospital and raising costs of their hospital stay by an average of $865. (redorbit.com)
  • The findings, published in JAMA Internal Medicine, came from the first hospital-based study to examine how patients' desire to participate in medical decisions affects their use of health care resources. (redorbit.com)
  • If 30 percent of those patients chose to share decision making rather than delegate that role to their doctors, it would mean $8.7 billion of additional costs per year, according to the study. (redorbit.com)
  • The result that everyone would have liked, that patients who are more engaged in their care do better and cost less, is not what we found in this setting," said study author David Meltzer, MD, PhD, associate professor of medicine, economics and public policy at the University of Chicago. (redorbit.com)
  • Patients who want to be more involved do not have lower costs. (redorbit.com)
  • Patients who preferred not to delegate decisions to their doctors-those who wanted to work with their caregivers to reach decisions-spent about 5 percent more time in the hospital and incurred about 6 percent higher costs. (redorbit.com)
  • Our results suggest that encouraging patients to be more involved will not, alone, reduce costs. (redorbit.com)
  • Patients with the most education had lower costs than those with the least education, the study found. (redorbit.com)
  • Most hospitals aren't intentionally hiding costs, they're just not used to patients asking. (sify.com)
  • But he said that's likely to change as employers increasingly force workers to share more health care costs by paying higher co-payments and deductibles, making patients more motivated to ask about costs. (sify.com)
  • Kudia said some patients do ask in advance about costs of surgery and other medical procedures, and those questions require "a little bit of research" to come up with an average estimate. (sify.com)
  • Mr Hay also pointed out that as planned cost savings will remove one-fifth of the sector's cost base by 2015, it is likely that there will need to be a fundamental change in the way services are organised for patients to continue to access the quality care they need. (pharmatimes.com)
  • Some hospital officials attribute dropping occupancy rates to patients leaving hospitals sooner and to the fact that fewer people are being treated as in-patients. (orlandosentinel.com)
  • Herrick suggests tools like MediBid.com, which allow patients to enter their procedures online and have a network of doctors and hospitals put out potential bids on a request. (foxbusiness.com)
  • In fact, the 34 patients with complications (38 percent) drove up the total average cost for all 89 patients far more dramatically than any difference in hospital length of stay. (ucdavis.edu)
  • The exponential relationship between hospital length of stay and charges for patients with complications - in comparison to the linear relationship for patients without - demonstrates that a complication has an impact on increased charges above and beyond that of a prolonged hospitalization, the authors conclude. (ucdavis.edu)
  • Under such a system, if a hospital does additional tests and procedures or if patients get infections or are readmitted, the hospital bears the cost. (nytimes.com)
  • Initially, hospital systems were looking to reduce costs by providing more efficient and timely care of hospitalized patients this way," she said. (msbusiness.com)
  • By covering the hospital, our clinic doctors are able to provide more preventative office-based care, and our hospitalized patients receive care from physicians dedicated to remaining in the hospital. (msbusiness.com)
  • She says hospitalists are a valuable asset to the healthcare system because they stay in the hospital where they are available to review test results and have more time to speak with patients and families. (msbusiness.com)
  • These in-house physicians are also available any time to discharge patients, thus reducing patient costs. (msbusiness.com)
  • In a 2005 study conducted by Mt. Sinai Hospital in New York, patients seen by hospitalists had a 16% reduced length of stay and reduced costs of over $700 per case. (msbusiness.com)
  • This study investigated direct costs and related factors for hospitalised CAP patients. (ersjournals.com)
  • In conclusion, this study provides cost estimates for the treatment of patients hospitalised with CAP. (ersjournals.com)
  • In the mid-1980s, it was believed that Medicare's hospital prospective payment system with diagnosis-related groups may have led to hospitals' discharging patients to post-hospital care (such as skilled nursing facilities) more quickly than was appropriate to save money. (wikipedia.org)
  • Participating hospitals may not transfer or discharge patients needing emergency treatment except with the informed consent or stabilization of the patient or when their condition requires transfer to a hospital better equipped to administer the treatment. (wikipedia.org)
  • Congress passed EMTALA to eliminate the practice of "patient dumping," i.e., refusal to treat people because of inability to pay or insufficient insurance, or transferring or discharging emergency patients on the basis of high anticipated diagnosis and treatment costs. (wikipedia.org)
  • Patients treated under EMTALA may not be able to pay or have insurance or other programs pay for the associated costs but are legally responsible for any costs incurred as a result of their care under civil law. (wikipedia.org)
  • self-published source] Enoch Powell who was Minister of Health in the United Kingdom propounded a similar proposition, which he called Parkinson's Law of hospital beds: "the number of patients always tends to equality with the number of beds available for them to lie in. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Atrius Health groups have a long history of operating as a model for Accountable Care Organizations (ACO), with full responsibility for the quality and cost of care for many of their patients since before the term was coined by Elliott Fisher, MD, MPH, in 2006. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1,000
  • The advice comes in Monitor's latest quarterly report on the health of the foundation trust sector, which now comprises two-thirds of all NHS secondary care providers running about 1,000 hospitals. (pharmatimes.com)
  • Roemer and colleagues found a positive correlation between the number of short-term general hospital beds available per 1,000 population and the number of hospital days used per 1,000 population. (wikipedia.org)
  • utilization
  • First, recent changes in the economic environment in which hospitals operate has caused their utilization rates in the U.S. to fall sharply over the past decade, making previous estimates inaccurate. (repec.org)
  • Hospitals are increasingly motivated to implement clinical care pathways as a method of improving quality of care, with a focus on elimination of excess resource utilization and shortening the hospital length of stay," said lead author Richard Bold, professor and chief of surgical oncology at the UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center . (ucdavis.edu)
  • stays
  • When it comes to a specific type of pancreatic surgery, post-operative complications have a far greater impact on total cost than does how long the patient stays in the hospital, according to a published paper by UC Davis researchers. (ucdavis.edu)
  • One problem in this finding is that it could be the case that hospital stays are shorter in lower hospital bed per capita regions because of a deficit in supply (reverse causation). (wikipedia.org)
  • Pediatric
  • The number of children's hospitals proliferated in the 20th century, as pediatric medical and surgical specialties separated from internal medicine and adult surgical specialties. (wikipedia.org)
  • While many normal hospitals can treat children adequately, pediatric specialists may be a better choice when it comes to treating rare afflictions that may prove fatal or severely detrimental to young children, in some cases before birth. (wikipedia.org)
  • complications
  • Another aim of the current study was to determine if the increased costs found for smokers were primarily the result of respiratory complications. (facs.org)
  • Upon further analysis, the researchers found that, in fact, postoperative respiratory complications, and not length of hospital stay, account for the added expense for smokers undergoing elective general surgery operations. (facs.org)
  • PAC with treatment of moderate complications (US $112) cost 60% more per case than simple PAC (US $70). (ipas.org)
  • patient
  • The savings to the hospital from the more efficient use of existing resources and personnel is about $6 a day per patient. (washingtonpost.com)
  • That finding translated into a higher cost of approximately $900 for each patient who underwent a surgical procedure, Dr. Kamath said. (facs.org)
  • In fact, the authors note, "Policies that increase patient engagement may increase length of stay and costs. (redorbit.com)
  • Routine hip replacement surgery on a healthy patient without insurance may cost as little as $11,000 - or up to nearly $126,000. (sify.com)
  • Hospitals were told the made-up patient was the caller's grandmother, had no insurance but could afford to pay out of pocket - that's why knowing the cost information ahead of time was so important. (sify.com)
  • Often, rural hospitals maintain access to key community services that are used infrequently and therefore they become high cost outliers as there is lower patient volume across which to distribute these costs," said iVantage. (beckershospitalreview.com)
  • The average per-patient bill at Brevard hospitals is expected to rise from $3,172 to $3,572 this year while the state average is projected to go from $4,361 to $4,669, according to state officials. (orlandosentinel.com)
  • At Jess Parrish Memorial Hospital in Titusville, an average 8.4 percent increase in per-patient charges is projected, from $3,002 to $3,296, said Elizabeth Vieira, director of marketing and planning. (orlandosentinel.com)
  • Some hospital officials said it would be unfair to judge the institutions simply on their average charge per patient because some hospitals offer far more expensive specialized services and are buying more expensive equipment than others. (orlandosentinel.com)
  • His group decided to go through every single process a patient experiences and figure out what the hospital paid for each person caring for the patient. (nytimes.com)
  • In addition, controlling for patient risk factors, the inpatient mortality rate in the demonstration hospitals declined over the course of the project. (wikipedia.org)
  • If a patient is already in the hospital for another reason and develops an emergency condition, EMTALA similarly does not apply. (wikipedia.org)
  • A duty was owed: a legal duty exists whenever a hospital or health care provider undertakes care or treatment of a patient. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1989
  • Another early experience with bundled payments occurred between 1987 and 1989, involving an orthopedic surgeon, a hospital (Ingham Regional Medical Center), and a health maintenance organization (HMO) in Michigan. (wikipedia.org)
  • researchers found
  • That's what researchers found after calling hospitals in every state, 122 in all, asking what a healthy 62-year-old woman would have to pay to get an artificial hip. (sify.com)
  • An editorial accompanying the hip replacement study said "there is no justification" for the huge cost variation the researchers found. (sify.com)
  • medical
  • Hospital care accounts for roughly 40 per cent of the $139 billion spent last year for medical care in this country and is the largest single item on te national medical bill. (washingtonpost.com)
  • In an effort to control rising pital casts, President Carter, against the vehement objection of the American Hospital Association and the American Medical Association, has asked Congress to impose a limit of roughly 9 per cent on the annual increase in revenues that a hospital may receive. (washingtonpost.com)
  • A few online sites provide price comparisons for common medical procedures, but the editorial said that kind of information "is of almost no value" without information on hospital quality. (sify.com)
  • Hospital charges are essentially their list prices for medical services. (beckershospitalreview.com)
  • The linchpin of this effort at the University of Utah Health Care is a computer program - still a work in progress - with 200 million rows of costs for items like drugs, medical devices, a doctor's time in the operating room and each member of the staff's time. (nytimes.com)
  • Other medical institutions, including MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston and the Mayo Clinic, based in Rochester, Minn., are also trying to get a handle on costs. (nytimes.com)
  • In a more technical sense, the term is used to describe any form of insurance that provides protection against the costs of medical services. (wikipedia.org)
  • A major trend in employer sponsored cover has been increasing premiums, deductibles, and co-payments for medical services, and increasing the costs of using out-of-network health providers rather than in-network providers. (wikipedia.org)
  • Medical professionals may obtain professional liability insurances to offset the costs of lawsuits based on medical malpractice. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hospital costs associated with such medical errors were estimated at $324 million in October 2008 alone. (wikipedia.org)
  • Relying on vicarious liability or direct corporate negligence, claims may also be brought against hospitals, clinics, managed care organizations or medical corporations for the mistakes of their employees and contractors. (wikipedia.org)
  • This sophistication of technology includes a web portal that allows clinicians within Atrius Health and partnering organizations to have easy one-click, read-only access to a patient's electronic medical record at many hospitals in the area. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dr. Strongwater recently completed a term as the Chair of the American Hospital Association's Committee on Health Professions as well as an Advisor to the Association of American Medical Colleges for the CMS Bundling Project. (wikipedia.org)
  • health care costs
  • Because smokers often have coexisting health conditions such as hypertension, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes, and coronary artery disease-all of which can drive up health care costs-the researchers controlled for these factors as well as other factors, including age and urgency of surgical procedure. (facs.org)
  • The type and amount of health care costs that will be covered by the health insurance provider are specified in writing, in a member contract or "Evidence of Coverage" booklet for private insurance, or in a national health policy for public insurance. (wikipedia.org)
  • surgeries
  • Bundled payments began as early as 1984, when The Texas Heart Institute, under the direction of Denton Cooley, began to charge flat fees for both hospital and physician services for cardiovascular surgeries. (wikipedia.org)
  • services
  • This suggests that the primary source of hospital cost savings is through reduced need of intensive care services or reduced length of stay perhaps due to a less severe illness. (rwjf.org)
  • Decreasing margins driven by the current economic climate and a focus on cost-saving and efficiency now should give trusts the impetus to explore and drive new ways for reconfiguring services to continue to deliver high-quality healthcare in future," he suggests. (pharmatimes.com)
  • She wanted to know: What do the goods and services provided by the hospital system where she is chief executive actually cost? (nytimes.com)
  • The $70 billion budget for 2010-11 contained the following allocations: Health and Social Services $30 billion Education $21.2 billion Transportation $7.9 billion Criminal Justice and Corrections $4.5 billion General government $4 billion Natural Resources and Environment $3 billion Reserves $2.28 billion Courts $459 million In 2011, undocumented immigrants were estimated to cost the Florida government $700 million. (wikipedia.org)
  • AIS has over 2,400 employees and works with Ascension's affiliates to determine ways to improve services, cut costs, and improve operating efficiencies within each ministry. (wikipedia.org)
  • If there is an upper limit on coinsurance, the policy-holder could end up owing very little, or a great deal, depending on the actual costs of the services they obtain. (wikipedia.org)
  • The insured are generally expected to pay the full cost of non-covered services out of their own pockets. (wikipedia.org)
  • internal medicine
  • It started with one physician, Dr. Renee Wilson, who was affiliated with a local internal medicine group, and has grown to six full-time hospitalists who cover the hospital weekdays and evenings. (msbusiness.com)
  • study
  • A California study published last year about surgery to remove an appendix found similar cost disparities. (sify.com)
  • Commenting on the study, American Hospital Association spokeswoman Marie Watteau said hospitals "have a uniform set of charges. (sify.com)
  • A study recently released by researchers at the University of California San Francisco finds surgery costs can vary widely at different hospitals, even if they are just down the street or right around the corner from each other. (foxbusiness.com)
  • Further, the study shows the hospital can get the expertise it needs through a collaborative relationship with a community hospice. (eurekalert.org)
  • efficiency
  • Although the techniques involved in the admission scheduling system are relatively simple and well-known in the business world, it has been only recently that hospitals have come under pressure to find ways to minimize their costs and increase their efficiency. (washingtonpost.com)
  • doctors
  • This code will allow you to call other hospitals and doctors' offices to price the procedures. (foxbusiness.com)
  • You can get bids for these potential procedures, and choose between doctors and hospitals. (foxbusiness.com)
  • We started our program so that our clinic doctors would be present in the clinic five days a week, without interruptions throughout the day and the need to run back and forth to the hospital. (msbusiness.com)
  • Many doctors don't want to keep up with it, and we have good working relationships with the doctors outside the hospital," she said. (msbusiness.com)
  • Most children's hospitals can serve children from birth up to the age of 18, or in some instances, children's hospitals' doctors may treat children until they finish high school. (wikipedia.org)
  • California
  • 1993. " Hospital Costs and Excess Bed Capacity: A Statistical Analysis ," Economics Working Papers 93-209, University of California at Berkeley. (repec.org)
  • surgery
  • The hospital has been able to calculate, for instance, the cost per minute in the emergency room (82 cents), in the surgical intensive care unit ($1.43), and in the operating room for an orthopedic surgery case ($12). (nytimes.com)
  • The surgeon and the hospital received a predetermined fee for any arthroscopic surgery performed, but they also provided a two-year warranty in that they promised to cover any post-surgery expenses (for example, four re-operations) instead of the HMO. (wikipedia.org)
  • stay
  • The average hospital stay in the state this year is estimated at 6.8 days, compared with 7.2 last year. (orlandosentinel.com)
  • There's an exponential increase in cost once there's a complication, with an impact on hospital charges that far outpaces a long hospital stay," explained Bold. (ucdavis.edu)
  • Length of hospital stay (p=0.001, r= 0.78), use of antipseudomonal antibiotic combination (p=0.001), use of antibiotic within 3 months (p=0.001) and two or more hospitalisation days within 3 months (p=0.031) increased the costs but age, comorbidity, treatment success, ICU requirement, PSI and CURB65 scores did not increase the costs. (ersjournals.com)
  • Major determinants of costs were length of hospital stay, use of antipseudomonal antibiotic combination, use of antibiotic within 3 months and two or more hospitalisation days within 3 months. (ersjournals.com)
  • In a case reviewed by courts, EMTALA did not cover the hospital stay. (wikipedia.org)
  • preventative
  • The Congressional Budget Office and related government agencies scored the cost of a universal health care system several times since 1991, and have uniformly predicted cost savings, probably because of the 40% cost savings associated with universal preventative care and elimination of insurance company overhead costs. (wikipedia.org)
  • percent
  • MELBOURNE - Hospital charges in Brevard County are expected to go up an average of 13 percent this year, but still will be well below the state average. (orlandosentinel.com)
  • Eighty-eight percent of doctor and hospital bills are paid for today by third parties," Herrick says. (foxbusiness.com)
  • beds
  • The admissions scheduling system also can be used to help hospitals close unneeded beds, possibly aiding in the reduction of a 100,000-bed surplus in the United States that is costing more than an estimated $1 billion a year. (washingtonpost.com)
  • patient's
  • Sharing meaningful information, however, is challenging because hospital care is unique and based on each individual patient's needs. (sify.com)
  • reduce
  • The regulator of NHS foundation trusts is urging them to start delivering hospital cost savings earlier in the year in order to reduce their exposure to financial risk. (pharmatimes.com)
  • Be honest with your doctor about your financial situation, he or she might be able to find a lower-cost alternative or make suggestions to reduce costs. (foxbusiness.com)
  • Commercial payers have shown interest in bundled payments in order to reduce costs. (wikipedia.org)
  • Congress
  • A proposed federal measure that would have required states to force hospitals to make their charges public failed to advance in Congress last year but could be revived this year, the editorial says. (sify.com)
  • total
  • Uncompensated care represents 6% of total hospital costs. (wikipedia.org)
  • Coinsurance: Instead of, or in addition to, paying a fixed amount up front (a co-payment), the co-insurance is a percentage of the total cost that insured person may also pay. (wikipedia.org)
  • Administrators
  • Besides Greater Southeast, the system has been introduced at about a dozen hospitals in Michigan.Administrators in three separate hospitals describe teh system and their results in enthusiastic terms when interviewed. (washingtonpost.com)
  • rates
  • Other reasons are less obvious: more red tape and regulations from government, strikes, specialization and physician practice patterns, rising interest rates, and laws that inhibit cost containment. (washingtonpost.com)
  • insurance
  • Toohey, 54, said his health insurance covered most of the costs, and it didn't occur to him to ask about price beforehand. (sify.com)
  • Out-of-pocket maxima: Similar to coverage limits, except that in this case, the insured person's payment obligation ends when they reach the out-of-pocket maximum, and health insurance pays all further covered costs. (wikipedia.org)
  • make
  • She said states and local hospital associations are the best source for pricing data, and that many states already require or encourage hospitals to report pricing information and make that data available to the public. (sify.com)
  • If trusts do not plan early enough, they run up an early deficit, only to clear it later in the year when savings plans begin to bite, says Monitor, and it is urging trust boards to take a closer look at the issue and make sure cost savings are delivered earlier in the year. (pharmatimes.com)
  • data
  • On the other hand, there is limited data about the cost of CAP in Turkey. (ersjournals.com)
  • A 2001 paper examining three of the original four hospitals with comparable "micro-cost" data determined that "the cost reductions primarily came from nursing intensive care unit, routine nursing, pharmacy, and catheter lab. (wikipedia.org)
  • care
  • For those needing to purchase assistive devices, the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care pays up to 75% of the cost through its Assistive Devices Program (see separate record here ). (hipinfo.info)
  • He's spent the first two weeks of life in the neonatal intensive care unit of the University of Kansas Hospital. (beachcenter.org)
  • She says based on these early findings, DHA could prevent 80,000 very premature births in America every year, and save nine billion dollars in health care costs. (beachcenter.org)
  • The American Burn Association, the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma, the American College of Emergency Physicians, America's Essential Hospitals, the American College of Surgeons, the American Trauma Society, and the Trauma Center Association of America wrote a joint letter calling themselves "organizations representing the trauma care community" in support of H.R. 3548 and the change of the statutory definition of "trauma. (wikipedia.org)
  • state
  • but my surgeon and hospital are in another state, and wont pay for them without a special exception, which I dont know if I will be able to get before I lose my surgical date. (blogspot.com)
  • The bill would not impose intergovernmental or private-sector mandates as defined in the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act and would impose no costs on state, local, or tribal governments. (wikipedia.org)
  • another
  • As services and beds at Riverview continuously decreased, while opening access of it through private practice, another official plan to entirely close Riverview Hospital was written in 1987: A Draft Plan to Replace Riverview Hospital. (wikipedia.org)
  • Assistance
  • British Columbia's first Provincial Botanist, John Davidson, established an arboretum, nursery and a botanical garden on the hospital lands, often with the assistance of patients as there was a belief in the therapeutic value. (wikipedia.org)