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  • equine
  • In order for these horses to be brought back to a healthy condition, it is important to assess the current condition to determine an appropriate feeding and health care program in conjunction with an equine veterinarian. (horsefeedblog.com)
  • These horses require careful attention from an equine veterinarian as IV fluid administration and blood work are essential and support with a sling will probably be required. (horsefeedblog.com)
  • De-worming should be done in consultation with an equine veterinarian as the horse recovers. (horsefeedblog.com)
  • Our equine welfare project is based in Granada and targets both carriage and cart horses as well as those owned by low income households who cannot afford veterinary care for their horses. (worldvets.org)
  • If you have been looking for a way to help horses abroad, we have volunteer opportunities available as part of our equine welfare project in Nicaragua. (worldvets.org)
  • From ocular ailments (see article ) to the recent equine piroplasmosis outbreaks ( article ) to unwanted horses ( article ), the American Association of Equine Practitioners covered all the latest in clinical, scientific, and welfare issues concerning horses at its 56th Annual Convention, Dec. 4-8 in Baltimore. (avma.org)
  • 2010 saw the second full year of work defined by the association's revised strategic plan, which has three areas of focus: growing the profession, high-quality continuing education, and equine welfare efforts. (avma.org)
  • Business education seminars, the Veterinary Sport Horse Symposium, and 360° meetings were just some examples of the learning opportunities provided to equine practitioners, said David Foley, executive director of the AAEP. (avma.org)
  • A gelding is a castrated horse or other equine , such as a donkey or a mule . (wikipedia.org)
  • Mongolia holds more than 3 million horses, an equine population which outnumbers the country's human population. (wikipedia.org)
  • A mare is an adult female horse or other equine. (wikipedia.org)
  • Equine welfare describes the acceptable conditions of life and use for domesticated horses, in contrast to suffering produced by voluntary or involuntary actions of others, whether through physical abuse, mutilation, neglect, or other forms of ill treatment. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, with proper training and management, stallions are effective equine athletes at the highest levels of many disciplines, including horse racing, horse shows, and international Olympic competition. (wikipedia.org)
  • stallion
  • Castration, as well as the elimination of hormonally-driven behavior associated with a stallion , allows a male horse to be calmer and better-behaved, making the animal quieter, gentler and potentially more suitable as an everyday working animal . (wikipedia.org)
  • In horse racing , castrating a stallion may be considered worthwhile if the animal is easily distracted by other horses, difficult to handle, or otherwise not running to his full potential due to behavioral issues. (wikipedia.org)
  • While this means the horse loses any breeding value, a successful track career can often be a boost to the value of the stallion that sired the gelding. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sometimes a stallion used for breeding is castrated later in life, possibly due to sterility , or because the offspring of the stallion are not up to expectations, or simply because the horse is not used much for breeding, due to shifting fashion in pedigree or phenotype . (wikipedia.org)
  • Castration may allow a stallion to live peacefully with other horses, allowing a more social and comfortable existence. (wikipedia.org)
  • When used as ordinary riding animals, they are kept only with or near other male horses in a "bachelor" setting, which tends to produce calmer, less stallion-like behavior. (wikipedia.org)
  • http://www.thinklikeahorse.org/index.html Most horse people won't believe that people would buy a stallion and think it was a gelding. (bestoftarhely.info)
  • Most people won't buy a Stud or Stallion and since they have bad reputations (Undeserved bad reputations) but the belief is there and since it cost money to geld a horse, that cuts into profit so people come up with cruel ways to save money. (bestoftarhely.info)
  • Elizabeth Kendall observed in 1911 that, "Each drove of horses is in the charge of a stallion which looks sharply after the mares, fighting savagely with any other stallion which attempts to join the herd. (wikipedia.org)
  • An uncastrated adult male horse is called a stallion and a castrated male is a gelding. (wikipedia.org)
  • The injuring, mutilating and putting to death of horses (witness the sacrifices, horse slaughtering, horse baiting, and the organization of stallion fights) are extensively documented in numerous regions of the world. (wikipedia.org)
  • A stallion is a male horse that has not been gelded (castrated). (wikipedia.org)
  • There is usually one dominant mature stallion for every mixed-sex herd of horses. (wikipedia.org)
  • The dominant stallion in the herd will tolerate both sexes of horses while young, but once they become sexually mature, often as yearlings or two-year-olds, the stallion will drive both colts and fillies from the herd. (wikipedia.org)
  • Colts may present competition for the stallion, but studies suggest that driving off young horses of both sexes may also be an instinctive behavior that minimizes the risk of inbreeding within the herd, as most young are the offspring of the dominant stallion in the group. (wikipedia.org)
  • cattle
  • Chilean Horses were selected for lateral dexterity, courage to confront and pin belligerent cattle and an even temperament that permitted a high degree of trainability while conserving needed energy for a long day's work. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sorting the cattle by ownership, designated use, and requirements for castration and branding resulted in herding and pushing cattle down long alleyways into classifying pens. (wikipedia.org)
  • In North America, the most common commands are: Back: back up Gee: turn to the right Get up (also giddyup or giddyap, contractions for "get thee up" or "get ye up"): go Haw: turn to the left Whoa: stop In the New England tradition, young castrated cattle selected for draft are known as working steers and are painstakingly trained from a young age. (wikipedia.org)
  • Vets
  • To alleviate the hardships they face, World Vets has been providing free veterinary services for the working horse population in Nicaragua for many years. (worldvets.org)
  • R-VETS, Dr. Jose Estrada who operates his mixed animal practice out of San Miguel, Guanajuato and has been working with R-VETS for several years, one vet student from Mexico, two vet students from the U.S., and several locals who have ties to horses and vet medicine, and were a tremendous help in keeping the clinics running smoothly. (blueridgeequine.com)
  • carriage horses
  • In the early twenty-first century, these issues remained in the public eye and new controversies arose, especially about training methods such as Rollkur, problems in the field of endurance riding, stable confinement, and the presence of carriage horses in modern cities such as New York. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Karossier were considered luxury items, noble carriage horses with high-stepping gaits, and so they were purchased by State Studs for use in other regions of Germany, but were also sent to Poland, Austria and Hungary, France, Denmark, and the Netherlands. (wikipedia.org)
  • mares
  • There are more males than just herd stallions, but unattached male horses group together for protection in small all-male " bachelor herds ", where, in the absence of mares, they tend to behave much like geldings. (wikipedia.org)
  • These people usually used mares for everyday work and for war. (wikipedia.org)
  • How can you tell if your cut, it something they on purpose or happens 2 feb colt also makes management easier actually breeding, this will have impact his behavior 'thoroughbred' breed horses which was developed in 17th century male castrated termed at any age What are colts, stallions, geldings, mares and fillies? (bestoftarhely.info)
  • The end of the 19th century brought with it a decline in agrarian property sizes, the use of thrashing machines that extinguished the need for thrasher mares, railroads and automobiles that greatly limited the use of the horse as a means of transport and the growth of specialized breeds that substituted the Chilean Horse in draft, carriage and racing needs. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mares are used in every equestrian sport and usually compete equally with stallions and geldings in most events, though some competitions may offer classes open only to one sex of horse or another, particularly in breeding or "in-hand" conformation classes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Stallions follow the conformation and phenotype of their breed, but within that standard, the presence of hormones such as testosterone may give stallions a thicker, "cresty" neck, as well as a somewhat more muscular physique as compared to female horses, known as mares, and castrated males, called geldings. (wikipedia.org)
  • livestock
  • With that being said, students and instructors can expect this to be a strictly small animal project, where horses and/or livestock will not be seen and/or treated. (worldvets.org)
  • De-beaking, de-toeing, tail-docking, tooth pulling, castration, and dehorning of livestock without anaesthetic are legal, as is confinement in gestation crates and battery cages. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2016
  • UK - NFU Mutual, the UK's leading rural insurer, is reminding those with working dogs that, from April 6th 2016, all dogs must be micro chipped by law and that failing to comply may result in a £500 fine. (thepetsite.co.uk)
  • 17th century
  • By the 17th century, Chile had very defined types in parade horses, pacers and trotters and the country had gained the reputation of having the best horses in South America. (wikipedia.org)
  • Horses were routinely killed on the field of battle, branded, cut on the ears in order to facilitate quick recognition, spurred, or docked (have their tails amputated) from the 17th century to prevent the tail from becoming stuck in the harness. (wikipedia.org)
  • heavier
  • The plow horses of the Frisian marshes had to be powerful to work through the heavy soil, and so were significantly heavier than farm horses in other parts of Europe. (wikipedia.org)
  • War and the appearance of the horse-powered tractor in the 20th century increased the demand for heavier horses, which Oldenburg and East Frisia supplied. (wikipedia.org)
  • Light work such as carting household items on good roads might require just one pair, while for heavier work, further pairs would be added as necessary. (wikipedia.org)
  • rodeo
  • These were the dams of some of the best 'corraleros' (rodeo horses) of the time. (wikipedia.org)
  • The saving grace of the Chilean Horse breed was the upsurge in the popularity of the Chilean rodeo. (wikipedia.org)
  • Outcrossing to other breeds has never been a temptation since the Chilean Horse is well-suited for the Chilean rodeo sport. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the United States, the practice of soring resulted in the passage of the Horse Protection Act of 1970 and various organizations protested against abuses in horse racing and rodeo. (wikipedia.org)
  • Africa
  • Dr. Roba also established the International Fund for Africa, which is working with local partners to set up veterinary training programs for small animal care and educating the public about the humane treatment of draught animals. (wikipedia.org)
  • starvation
  • Changes and challenges in the horse industry may have resulted in an increased number of horses that have experienced prolonged periods of inadequate nutrient intakes, resulting in loss of weight and, in some cases, actual starvation. (horsefeedblog.com)
  • Smith: 'The rewards are there too, you know, rehabbing a horse from starvation and retraining it and then watching it find it's person and go to a forever home. (koamtv.com)
  • routine
  • Instead you will work in field clinic conditions where we will operate a fully functional mobile surgery setup and travel with the veterinary supplies needed to provide routine veterinary care. (worldvets.org)
  • Most general practice veterinarians perform routine surgery [neuters (spay and castration), minor mass excisions, etc.], some also perform additional procedures. (wikipedia.org)
  • animals
  • To allow only the finest animals to breed on, while preserving adequate genetic diversity , only a small percentage of all male horses should remain stallions. (wikipedia.org)
  • for example, castration of both animals and humans was categorically forbidden in the Hebrew Bible and is prohibited in Jewish law. (wikipedia.org)
  • These work animals play a major in role in the Ethiopian economy. (wikipedia.org)
  • There are no regulations on the treatment of work animals apart from the Criminal Code's prohibitions on public cruelty. (wikipedia.org)
  • Current policy work addressing working animals in Ethiopia" (PDF). (wikipedia.org)
  • Other than that, they serve as riding animals, both for the daily work of the nomads and in horse racing. (wikipedia.org)
  • Herdsman prefer to make long journeys during seasons when horses are well fed so as to spare tired or thin animals from exertion. (wikipedia.org)
  • Particularly in the spring, horses are vulnerable to exhaustion: "By the end of winter, the animals are a dreadful sight. (wikipedia.org)
  • Thus, horses are the second most winter-resilient animals raised by Mongolians. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the nineteenth century, when the sight of a horse dying while working was commonplace, the first wave of awareness was born with the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals and the publication of the novel Black Beauty in England. (wikipedia.org)
  • The debate intensified and extended throughout North America and Europe over the next century, particularly regarding the use of the horse during war, the use of horses as working animals on city streets, sports training, horse slaughter, and conditions of horse breeding and keeping. (wikipedia.org)
  • castration makes the animals easier to control. (wikipedia.org)
  • breeds
  • The Chilean horse prior to 1850 was a closed breed type, due the absence of European breeds in a country that was convinced they had the best horses in South America. (wikipedia.org)
  • The heavy warmbloods (German: Schwere Warmblüter) are a group of horse breeds primarily from continental Europe. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1850
  • France followed suit with the creation of the French League for the Protection of the Horse and the passage of the Grammont Law in 1850. (wikipedia.org)
  • stallions
  • Most of the horses came from the fertile valleys of Charcas (now Sucre, Bolivia), but some of the finest stallions were selected from throughout the kingdom. (wikipedia.org)
  • Organized horse breeding began in Oldenburg under Count Anton Günther (1603-1667), who brought popular stallions from Spain, Italy, Turkey, and Poland. (wikipedia.org)
  • particularly
  • Complete feeds, particularly Senior Feeds, also work very well in this situation with controlled starch and sugar levels, amino acid profile, high digestibility, and easy to chew attributes. (horsefeedblog.com)
  • Horses are very quiet and show few signs of discomfort, which makes the detection of pain particularly difficult. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Spanish horses, ancestors of the Andalusian, the Danish Fredriksborg, and the Neapolitan horse were particularly popular among the German nobility during the 17th and 18th centuries. (wikipedia.org)
  • rescue
  • A local horse rescue organization is using this Labor Day holiday weekend to raise awareness of their mission. (koamtv.com)
  • Leslie Smith is the co-owner of the Grumpy Horse Ranch and Rescue and that ranch -- is named for this fellow here, but he's not so grumpy anymore. (koamtv.com)
  • Smith says they've unfortunately had a horse they rescue pass away, because they were in such bad shape. (koamtv.com)
  • Unlike
  • Unlike the registries of the sport horses that followed them, many heavy warmblood registries maintain closed or partly closed studbooks. (wikipedia.org)
  • recover
  • One method to recover these horses is by using high quality alfalfa hay as a base high protein, low starch diet, introduced gradually and increased to ad libidum feeding in about 2 weeks (Stull, 2003). (horsefeedblog.com)
  • free
  • These horses are also frequently salt starved, so salt should also be introduced gradually at 1-2 oz per day and increased until it can be offered free choice. (horsefeedblog.com)
  • The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). (chronofhorse.com)
  • The Wild Free-Roaming Horse and Burro Act of 1971 put the BLM in charge of the U.S. wild horse and burro populations' management. (avma.org)
  • adoption
  • There are forms to fill out and an adoption contract, which ensures the horses don't end up right back where the started, in abusive situations. (koamtv.com)
  • In addition, the Bureau of Land Management approached the AAEP this past summer about evaluating the government agency's methods for rounding up horses for adoption or sale. (avma.org)
  • long
  • Even still, between word of mouth and the campo P.A. system, it wouldn't be long before dust-trails of burros and horses would start rolling in! (blueridgeequine.com)
  • Even so, the innumerable mountains, ridges and valleys over a 4,300 km (2,700 mi) long landscape assured that the purity of many Chilean Horses remained intact. (wikipedia.org)
  • help
  • Yesterday this blog broached the subject of the need for low-cost castration of colts and ungelded older horses as one way to help reduce the burgeoning horse population. (equusmagazine.com)
  • A rescued horse needs Dr. Pol's expertise to help calm his disposition. (bestoftarhely.info)
  • In the 1980s a new preservation society was formed, and with the help of horses from Poland, Denmark, the Netherlands and Moritzburg State Stud, the breed was saved. (wikipedia.org)
  • Chronicle
  • As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the forums. (chronofhorse.com)
  • Chronicle forums chronicle of horse. (bestoftarhely.info)
  • loses
  • Once the horse loses its usefulness, it could even be slaughtered and turned into food for humans. (wikipedia.org)
  • heavily
  • In Nicaragua, especially in low income households, horses are heavily relied upon for transportation, whether it be transporting people or raw materials. (worldvets.org)
  • Most of the owners not only have a bond with their horses and burros, but rely on them HEAVILY for transportation, herding, plowing, and hauling crops and supplies. (blueridgeequine.com)
  • treatment
  • Each family member has his or her own horse, which may receive special treatment. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, along with this treatment develop beneficial horse-human interaction for the animal, with many examples of worship. (wikipedia.org)
  • dogs
  • NFU Mutual, which offers insurance for both pet and working dogs, hopes that the new law will make it easier for lost or stolen dogs to be re-united with their owners. (thepetsite.co.uk)
  • In 2015, the insurer saw an increase in the cost for claims involving working dogs that had strayed or been stolen with the average claim costing £1368 - an increase of 6.3% on the previous year. (thepetsite.co.uk)
  • Those who like total submission prefer dogs or horses. (wikipedia.org)
  • Xylazine is approved for use in dogs, cats, horses, deer, and elk in the United States, while medetomidine is only approved for dogs. (wikipedia.org)
  • time
  • If the horses have a heavy parasite load as determined by fecal egg count, they may have to be treated with a half dose the first time to reduce the risk of problems from the de-worming. (horsefeedblog.com)
  • The AAEP Biologic and Therapeutic Agents Committee continues to work on content for a compounding brochure whose time line for release has not yet been set. (avma.org)
  • Horses were extremely important in towns at that time, due to the use of horse-drawn vehicles. (wikipedia.org)
  • The horse is also a sociable creature, designed by evolution to spend most of it time grazing in a natural setting. (wikipedia.org)
  • Many nations have passed assorted laws to protect horses from practices that include tail docking, transportation for excessive lengths of time, and artificial aids in horse racing or other equestrian competitions are subject to bans or national or European limitations. (wikipedia.org)
  • This time, Culpepper & Co. are outgunned, and forced to surrender their sidearms, which they view as a symbolic castration. (wikipedia.org)
  • species
  • From the perspective of the scientist David W. Ramey, the human-horse relationship has been beneficial to both species. (wikipedia.org)
  • people
  • I was proud of having worked with people who make a difference in the life of an animal. (worldvets.org)
  • The Scythians are thought to have been the first people to geld their horses. (wikipedia.org)
  • One thing all of these people had in common though, was their willingness to work hard, live off the land, and take care of the things that were important to them. (blueridgeequine.com)
  • Mongol people individually have favorite horses. (wikipedia.org)
  • genetic
  • Though there are two names (Old-Oldenburg and East Friesian), the horse is quite the same, having always exchanged genetic material. (wikipedia.org)
  • different
  • But here, even in the busy and chaos of the Vet work, it is different, its not something you are even conscious of, the stress and tension and hurry, they don't belong here. (gardnervet.com)
  • Really a completely different situation than a straightforward castration. (homesteadingtoday.com)
  • services
  • Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. (chronofhorse.com)
  • endurance
  • One exception to this general rule is the field of endurance riding, which requires horses to be 60 true calendar months old (5 years) before competing at longer distances. (wikipedia.org)
  • cattle
  • Ideal for operations that may not have sufficient facilities or labor to move and work cattle, especially during hot weather. (pbsanimalhealth.com)
  • Chilean Horses were selected for lateral dexterity, courage to confront and pin belligerent cattle and an even temperament that permitted a high degree of trainability while conserving needed energy for a long day's work. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sorting the cattle by ownership, designated use, and requirements for castration and branding resulted in herding and pushing cattle down long alleyways into classifying pens. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Criminal Code includes special protections for cattle, horses, mules, asses, pigs, sheep, and goats, but excludes chicken and fish, which make up the majority of animals raised and killed for food in Canada. (wikipedia.org)
  • mares
  • There are more males than just herd stallions, but unattached male horses group together for protection in small all-male "bachelor herds," where, in the absence of mares, they tend to behave much like geldings. (wikipedia.org)
  • These people usually used mares for everyday work and for war. (wikipedia.org)
  • The end of the 19th century brought with it a decline in agrarian property sizes, the use of thrashing machines that extinguished the need for thrasher mares, railroads and automobiles that greatly limited the use of the horse as a means of transport and the growth of specialized breeds that substituted the Chilean Horse in draft, carriage and racing needs. (wikipedia.org)
  • Stallions follow the conformation and phenotype of their breed, but within that standard, the presence of hormones such as testosterone may give stallions a thicker, "cresty" neck, as well as a somewhat more muscular physique as compared to female horses, known as mares, and castrated males, called geldings. (wikipedia.org)
  • mules
  • According to The Donkey Sanctuary Ethiopia, there are 12.4 million oxen, 5.7 million donkeys, 2.4 million camels, 2 million horses, and 0.3 million mules in Ethiopia. (wikipedia.org)
  • orderly
  • After a series of odd jobs, working as an orderly in a psychiatric hospital, manager of a dance band, used car salesman, caterer, decorator and vacuum cleaner salesman, Kienholz settled in Los Angeles, where he became involved with the avant-garde art scene of the day. (wikipedia.org)
  • By the late 18th century, there were farms such as Principal, Catemu, Quilimuta, and Alhue that kept orderly records of the genealogy of the specialized horses they were breeding. (wikipedia.org)
  • animals
  • In keeping in touch with these people through their pets, the school is also partnering with the school of social work and the pharmacy school as it's looking at not only the health of animals, but also people who need help in the community. (blogspot.com)
  • These work animals play a major in role in the Ethiopian economy. (wikipedia.org)
  • There are no regulations on the treatment of work animals apart from the Criminal Code's prohibitions on public cruelty. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dr. Roba also established the International Fund for Africa, which is working with local partners to set up veterinary training programs for small animal care and educating the public about the humane treatment of draught animals. (wikipedia.org)
  • Current policy work addressing working animals in Ethiopia" (PDF). (wikipedia.org)
  • The Canadian Coalition for Farm Animals works to educate Canadians about farm animal welfare issues, promote reductions in the consumption of animal products, and push for legislative changes including bans on battery cages and gestation crates. (wikipedia.org)
  • long
  • Even so, the innumerable mountains, ridges and valleys over a 4,300 km (2,700 mi) long landscape assured that the purity of many Chilean Horses remained intact. (wikipedia.org)
  • somewhat
  • a work which in later generations would often only be somewhat tacitly or glancingly acknowledged as an achievement only made possible by his acceptance and endurance of punitive actions against him, including imprisonment, castration, and subjection to servility. (wikipedia.org)
  • modified-live
  • Because these are often the viral agents producers vaccinate for, confirming a purchased calf's vaccinations and working with your veterinarian to incorporate a modified-live vaccine on arrival is an important step in managing BRD. (beefmagazine.com)
  • allow
  • Scruggs noted that castration and dehorning are some of the main stressors on the immune system, so producers should do these as early as possible to minimize blood loss and allow for a faster immune system recovery. (beefmagazine.com)
  • once
  • Once more he is working for his Roman patron, now as a broker of warehouse space in his patron's several Roman warehouses. (wikipedia.org)
  • true
  • Most importantly of all, revealed in this work is the one true cause of the rise and fall of the world's greatest empires - that all civilizations rise and fall according to their racial homogeneity and nothing else - a nation can survive wars, defeats, natural catastrophes, but not racial dissolution. (stormfront.org)
  • career
  • Throughout much of their career, the work of the Kienholzes was more appreciated in Europe than in their native United States, though American museums have featured their art more prominently since the 1990s. (wikipedia.org)
  • fight
  • They valued geldings as war horses because they were quiet, lacked mating urges, were less prone to call out to other horses, were easier to keep in groups, and were less likely to fight with one another. (wikipedia.org)