• neuroendocrine
  • These organs and their interactions constitute the HPA axis, a major neuroendocrine system that controls reactions to stress and regulates many body processes, including digestion, the immune system, mood and emotions, sexuality, and energy storage and expenditure. (wikipedia.org)
  • Behavioral endocrinology is the study of hormonal processes and neuroendocrine systems that influence or regulate behavior. (wikipedia.org)
  • These hormones play a major role in the Neuroendocrine system which regulates the vital body functions of breathing, body weight, heart rate, muscle strength, cholesterol levels, especially body temperature. (wikipedia.org)
  • thymus
  • This syndrome consists of an enlargement of the adrenal gland, atrophy of the thymus, spleen, and other lymphoid tissue, and gastric ulcerations. (wikipedia.org)
  • Addison's
  • Fifty years later, a Guy's Hospital physician, Thomas Addison, showed that the adrenal glands were necessary for life, by identifying them as the site of damage in a previously mysterious and ultimately fatal illness, which became known as Addison's disease. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Overproduction of cortisol leads to Cushing's syndrome , whereas insufficient production is associated with Addison's disease . (wikipedia.org)
  • norepinephrine and epinephrine
  • The increase in activity of synthesis of norepinephrine and epinephrine within the medulla is done from glucocorticoids through the increase in reaction rate of certain enzymes, such as: tyrosine hydroxylase, aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase, dopamine-β-hydroxylase, and phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase. (wikipedia.org)
  • bloodstream
  • Peptide hormones are large polar hormones that are able to freely float in the bloodstream. (varsitytutors.com)
  • Classically, hormones are defined as chemical substances secreted directly into the bloodstream that act on a distant target organ or type of cell. (encyclopedia.com)
  • This is what regulates sugar levels in within your bloodstream. (bluwiki.com)
  • Protein-derived hormones (amines, amino acids, peptides, and polypeptides) are synthesized, stored, and released into the bloodstream in response to a stimulus. (avercast.com)
  • glands are located
  • Some potential side effects are: Trouble sleeping Fatigue Dry skin or hair Concentration difficulties depression Sensitivity to cold temperatures Frequent and heavy menstrual periods Joint and muscle pain The 2 adrenal glands are located on the top of the kidney and have two distinct sections. (wikipedia.org)
  • Stimulate
  • Once released by the plasma pro- stimulate growth of milk ducts, and on the hypothalamic- teins, these hormones are conjugated in the liver to inactive CHAPTER 22 PHYSIOLOGY OF THE ENDOCRINE SYSTEM 323 forms and then excreted in bile or urine. (avercast.com)
  • sodium
  • any of a group of hormones elaborated by the cortex of the adrenal gland , so called because of their effects on sodium, chloride, and potassium concentrations in the extracellular fluid. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • a hormone, secreted by the adrenal cortex, that maintains normal blood volume, promotes sodium and water retention, and increases urinary excretion of potassium and hydrogen ions. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Cellular functions include the immune system's production of T-lymphocytes and antibodies, and nonimmune related homeostatic functions such as liver gluconeogenesis, sodium reabsorption, osmoregulation, and brown adipose tissue nonshivering thermogenesis. (wikipedia.org)
  • gonadotropin-releasi
  • Calcium is the second messenger for angiotensin II, a Hormone Action at the Cellular Level strong vasoconstrictor that participates in control of arterial blood pressure, and for gonadotropin-releasing hormone. (avercast.com)
  • tissue
  • A variety of tumors can arise from adrenal tissue and are commonly found in medical imaging when searching for other diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • A variety of tumors can arise from adrenal tissue and are commonly found in medical imaging when searching for other diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cells that will become adrenal tissue move retroperitoneally to the upper portion of the mesonephros. (wikipedia.org)