• high histamine
  • Possible root causes of high histamine include lingering viral and bacterial infections, a combo of things in the environment such as fluoride in the water and preservatives in foods, PFOA's from using Teflon pans and stain-resistant coatings on carpeting for many years, toxins released from molds, and, I'm sure, many more. (geneticlifehacks.com)
  • Common triggers include: specific foods and drinks (especially alcohol, and high-histamine content foods) temperature extremes airborne smells including perfumes or smoke exercise or exertion emotional stress hormonal changes, particularly during adolescence, pregnancy and women's menstrual cycles There are no known causes, but the condition appears to be inherited in some patients. (wikipedia.org)
  • allergy
  • IgE (typical allergy) is the normal way that mast cells are activated. (geneticlifehacks.com)
  • Seneviratne has also been appointed as the Director of Centre for Mast Cell Disorders and as the President of the UK-Sri Lanka Immunology Foundation, an organisation that contributes towards the Immunology and Allergy education in Sri Lanka. (wikipedia.org)
  • He directs the Gastrointestinal Immunology and Cancer Research Group at the Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine at the University of Colombo, Sri Lanka and is a member of the NIHR Bio-resource Genetic study on Primary Immunodeficiency patients Seneviratne is also involved in several molecular genetic studies on patients with Hyper IgM syndrome, LRBA deficiency, CTLA4 Haploinsufficiency, Hyper IgE syndrome, CVID, Complement deficiencies, Food Allergy and Mast Cell Activation Disorder. (wikipedia.org)
  • eosinophils
  • Eosinophils, sometimes called eosinophiles or, less commonly, acidophils, are a variety of white blood cells and one of the immune system components responsible for combating multicellular parasites and certain infections in vertebrates. (wikipedia.org)
  • In normal individuals, eosinophils make up about 1-3% of white blood cells, and are about 12-17 micrometres in size with bilobed nuclei. (wikipedia.org)
  • When eosinophils are activated, they undergo cytolysis, where the breaking of the cell releases eosinophilic granules found in extracellular DNA traps. (wikipedia.org)
  • C3a is also able to play a role in chemotaxis for mast cells and eosinophils, but C5a is a more potent chemoattractant. (wikipedia.org)
  • surrounding blood vessels
  • Mast cells are present in most tissues characteristically surrounding blood vessels and nerves, and are especially prominent near the boundaries between the outside world and the internal milieu, such as the skin, mucosa of the lungs, and digestive tract, as well as the mouth, conjunctiva, and nose. (wikipedia.org)
  • release
  • Alternatively, h. pylori infection may actually inhibit histamine release in the stomach. (geneticlifehacks.com)
  • As explained by the Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy Syndrome Association, mast cells are a type of white blood cell commonly known for causing allergic reactions because they release histamines. (reference.com)
  • The stromal cells that surround HSCs are a component of the stem cell niche, and they release a number of ligands, including SCF. (wikipedia.org)
  • A classic symptom of polycythemia vera is pruritus or itching, particularly after exposure to warm water (such as when taking a bath), which may be due to abnormal histamine release or prostaglandin production. (wikipedia.org)
  • Another possible mechanism for the development for peptic ulcer is increased histamine release and gastric hyperacidity related with polycythemia vera. (wikipedia.org)
  • pain is due to the release of chemicals such as bradykinin and histamine that stimulate nerve endings. (wikipedia.org)
  • signaling molecules
  • Gasotransmitters , neurotransmitters , steroid hormones and eicosanoids are all examples of endogenous cell signaling molecules. (pharmacologyeducation.org)
  • pathways that activate phospholipase C to convert cellular phospholipids to diacylglycerol which promotes the activation of certain isoforms of protein kinase C, pathways that elevated cellular cytosolic Ca2+ which thereby regulate Ca2+-sensitive cell signaling molecules, and pathways that inhibit adenyl cyclase which thereby lowers cellular levels of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) to reduce the activity of cAMP-dependent signaling molecules. (wikipedia.org)
  • granules
  • They contain granules that store a number of chemicals, including histamine and tryptase , which are released when mast cells become activated. (labtestsonline.org)
  • Mast cells were first described by Paul Ehrlich in his 1878 doctoral thesis on the basis of their unique staining characteristics and large granules. (wikipedia.org)
  • These granules also led him to the incorrect belief that they existed to nourish the surrounding tissue, so he named them Mastzellen (from German Mast, meaning 'fattening', as of animals). (wikipedia.org)
  • These cells are eosinophilic or "acid-loving" due to their large acidophilic cytoplasmic granules, which show their affinity for acids by their affinity to coal tar dyes: Normally transparent, it is this affinity that causes them to appear brick-red after staining with eosin, a red dye, using the Romanowsky method. (wikipedia.org)
  • peptic
  • This happens due to the widespread peritoneal irritation by the ruptured viscus contents, as in peptic ulcer perforation, with consequent strong vagal activation, and generalized, extensive peripheral vasodilation and bradycardia. (wikipedia.org)
  • antigen
  • There are three pathways of activation, each of which leads to the formation of C3a and C3b, which is involved in antigen opsonization. (wikipedia.org)
  • hematopoietic
  • The "clone" in clonal mast cell disorders refers to the progeny of the hematopoietic progenitor carrying the D816V c-kit mutation. (endocrinologyadvisor.com)
  • SCF may serve as guidance cues that direct hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) to their stem cell niche (the microenvironment in which a stem cell resides), and it plays an important role in HSC maintenance. (wikipedia.org)
  • SCF also increases the survival of various hematopoietic progenitor cells, such as megakaryocyte progenitors, in vitro. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hematopoietic progenitor cells have also been shown to migrate towards a higher concentration gradient of SCF in vitro, which suggests that SCF is involved in chemotaxis for these cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • endothelial cells
  • Soluble and transmembrane SCF is produced by fibroblasts and endothelial cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • The endothelial cells lining the blood vessels become less responsive to vasocontrictive agents, lose their glycocalyx (normal coating) and negative ionic charge, become leaky and cause extensive over-expression of nitric oxide. (wikipedia.org)
  • Tissue factor that initiates the clotting cascade is produced by activated monocytes and the endothelial cells lining the blood vessels while antithrombin and fibrinolysis are impaired. (wikipedia.org)
  • tissues
  • Mast cells collect in various tissues and can affect organs where mast cells do not normally inhabit such as the liver, spleen and lymph nodes, and organs which have normal populations but numbers are increased. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is one of four categories of shock, a condition where there is not enough oxygen-carrying blood to meet the metabolic needs of the cells which make up the body's tissues and organs. (wikipedia.org)
  • induces
  • In addition, there is evidence that MSH induces mast-cell apoptosis (cell death). (jillcarnahan.com)
  • This activation induces a conformational change in the thioester domain of C3(H2O) that allows it to bind to a plasma protein called Factor B. This complex is then cleaved by Factor D, a serine protease, to form C3b(H2O)Bb, or fluid-phase C3-convertase. (wikipedia.org)