• drills
  • Crisis actor (aka actor-patient or actor victim) is a trained actor, role player, volunteer, or other person engaged to portray a disaster victim during emergency drills to train first responders such as police, firefighters or EMT personnel. (wikipedia.org)
  • synthetic
  • Simulations allow setting up a coherent synthetic environment that allows for integration of simulated systems in the early analysis phase via mixed virtual systems with first prototypical components to a virtual test environment for the final system. (wikipedia.org)
  • Students
  • The highest rated strategies were those that involved direct interaction of nurse faculty and students. (bookaride.net)
  • Nursing students' and lecturers' perspectives of OSCE incorporating simulation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dr. Xu and students demonstrated, for the first time, that it was possible to rapidly create phantoms representing a pregnant mother at the end of 3-, 6-, and 9-month gestational periods without relying on patient images that are difficult to obtain for pregnant patients. (wikipedia.org)
  • education
  • Clinical simulation is commonly employed in education and patient safety training of frontline health care professionals. (hkmj.org)
  • Stanbridge University is a private institution for higher education in Irvine, California. (wikipedia.org)
  • For each year from 2009 through 2015, Stanbridge University has been named to the President's Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll, the highest federal recognition a college or university can receive for volunteering, service-learning, and civic engagement. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 2016, Stanbridge University was designated the 2016 Gold Award for Excellence in Community Service by the California Association of Private Postsecondary Schools (CAPPS)-an award appointed to private institutions that offer higher education programs and make extensive efforts to uplift the community. (wikipedia.org)
  • real
  • We conducted an in-situ simulation of a clinical case 2 weeks before the first procedure in a real patient to assess the readiness of our preparation for the clinical service. (hkmj.org)
  • This is not the case and needs to be recognized by engineering management experts who want to use M&S. To ensure that the results of simulation are applicable to the real world, the engineering manager must understand the assumptions, conceptualizations, and implementation constraints of this emerging field. (wikipedia.org)
  • Among the reasons for the steadily increasing interest in simulation applications are the following: Using simulations is generally cheaper, safer and sometimes more ethical than conducting real-world experiments. (wikipedia.org)
  • Simulations can often be conducted faster than real time. (wikipedia.org)
  • Representing the real systems either via physical reproductions at smaller scale, or via mathematical models that allow representing the dynamics of the system via simulation, allows exploring system behavior in an articulated way which is often either not possible, or too risky in the real world. (wikipedia.org)
  • Unlike simulated or real patients, virtual patients can be accessed on demand, and the user may monitor a case over several months while spending less than an hour in real-time. (wikipedia.org)
  • These computer simulations are also called "microworlds" and are used to examine people's behavior in simulated real world settings where people typically try to control a complex system where later decisions are affected by earlier decisions. (wikipedia.org)
  • partial
  • Some groups have made a strong recommendation against arthroscopic partial meniscectomy in nearly all patients, stating that the only group of patients who may - or may not - benefit are those with a true locked knee. (wikipedia.org)
  • Professional knee societies, however, highlight other symptoms and related factors they believe are important, and continue to support limited use of arthroscopic partial meniscectomy in carefully selected patients. (wikipedia.org)
  • Modeling
  • Modeling and simulation (M&S) is the use of models - physical, mathematical, or otherwise logical representation of a system, entity, phenomenon, or process - as a basis for simulations - methods for implementing a model (either statically or) over time - to develop data as a basis for managerial or technical decision making through the exercise of simulation governance which covers analysis, experimentation, and training. (wikipedia.org)
  • Modeling Virtual Patients and Virtual Cases" (PDF). (wikipedia.org)
  • combine
  • Virtual patients combine scientific excellence, modern technologies and the innovative concept of game-based learning. (wikipedia.org)
  • Diego
  • SAN DIEGO -A patient lies in a hospital bed surrounded by hospital staff doing a routine examination and suddenly his blood pressure plummets and his heart stops. (militaryconnection.com)
  • computer
  • Users will be monitored from a distance by instructors who have the ability to instigate an emergency situation with each simulated patient by computer. (militaryconnection.com)
  • For instance, to determine which type of spoiler would improve traction the most while designing a race car, a computer simulation of the car could be used to estimate the effect of different spoiler shapes on the coefficient of friction in a turn. (wikipedia.org)
  • Virtual patients have also been considered computer-based simulations designed to complement clinical training. (wikipedia.org)
  • International Journal of Gaming and Computer-Mediated Simulations. (wikipedia.org)
  • environment
  • The off-peak work environment is important to understand because the risk for mortality increases for patients at night and on the weekend in hospitals. (jove.com)
  • task
  • Other factors leading to an over-reliance on automation and thus to automation bias include inexperience in a task (though inexperienced users tend to be most benefited by automated decision support systems), lack of confidence in one's own abilities, a lack of readily available alternative information, or desire to save time and effort on complex tasks or high workloads. (wikipedia.org)
  • provides
  • In-situ simulation provides an innovative method to identify critical deficiencies and unexpected issues before implementation of a new clinical service. (hkmj.org)
  • facilitate
  • There are rare but serious adverse effects that can occur, including venous thromboembolism, infections, and nerve damage The BMJ Rapid Recommendation includes infographics and shared decision making tools to facilitate a conversation between doctors and patients about the risks and benefits of arthroscopic surgery. (wikipedia.org)
  • physicians
  • Severe vision loss is a risk of orbital surgery which physicians should counsel patients about, but the overall risk rate is unknown. (readbyqxmd.com)
  • diagnostic
  • A billing database search was conducted to identify all patients who had orbital surgery during the study period, cross-checked against diagnostic codes related to vision loss. (readbyqxmd.com)
  • hospitals
  • The Institute of Medicine's report suggested that nearly 100,000 patients died annually from preventable mistakes in hospitals, with an additional 1 million who were injured. (onlinejacc.org)
  • Recently, first-year cardiology fellows at 4 teaching hospitals in Michigan participated in a study demonstrating the use of simulation for teaching femoral arterial access. (onlinejacc.org)
  • By 1928 the 20-story Broad Street location became the site of one of the first high-rise teaching hospitals in the world. (wikipedia.org)
  • Study
  • Microarray analysis has been carried out in this pilot study to compare delineated gene expression profiles in the biopsies of skeletal muscle taken from patients with chronic critical limb ischaemia (CLI) and non-ischaemic control subjects. (readbyqxmd.com)
  • time
  • 2000 reported, for the first time, a method in adopting a set of high-fidelity color image dataset from the Visible Human Project to develop the VIP-Man phantom which remains today to be one of the "finest" voxel phantoms with a voxel size of 0.33mm x 0.33mm x 1 mm. (wikipedia.org)
  • virtual
  • There are many different formats a virtual patient may take. (wikipedia.org)
  • However the overarching principle is that of interactivity-a virtual patient will have mechanisms for the learner to interact with the case and material or information is made available to the learner as they complete a range of learning activities. (wikipedia.org)
  • The MedBiquitous consortium established a working group in 2005 to create a free and open data standard for expressing and exchanging virtual patients between different authoring and delivery systems. (wikipedia.org)
  • This was in part to address the problem of exchanging and reusing virtual patients and in part to encourage and support easier and wider use of virtual patients in general. (wikipedia.org)
  • Virtual patients - what are we talking about? (wikipedia.org)
  • knee
  • As control, biopsies of six patients undergoing elective knee arthroplasty without evidence of peripheral arterial occlusive disease were taken. (readbyqxmd.com)
  • Arthroscopic surgery, however, does not appear to result in benefits to adults when performed for knee pain in patients with osteoarthritis who have a meniscal tear. (wikipedia.org)
  • procedure
  • However, the level of concern and anxiety experienced by fellows, regarding patient safety and their competence to perform those tasks, are likely as vivid now as they were the day the procedure was performed. (onlinejacc.org)
  • programs
  • The Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions performed a systematic review of current training programs and existing data regarding simulation training. (onlinejacc.org)
  • The new leadership team was committed to refocusing the institution's offering of programs to those that were highest in demand and would be most beneficial to working adults. (wikipedia.org)
  • The software also contains the images and videos from the original slide programs, along with the history of the patient. (wikipedia.org)