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  • coronary heart d
  • In addition, the risk for coronary heart disease was determined based on measurement of blood pressure, total cholesterol and glucose levels. (biomedcentral.com)
  • In fact, strong epidemiological evidence suggests that these risk factors explain at least 75% of new cases of coronary heart disease (CHD) each year. (cdc.gov)
  • A lack of physical activity causes approximately 6% of the burden of disease from coronary heart disease, 7% of type 2 diabetes, 10% of breast cancer and 10% of colon cancer worldwide. (wikipedia.org)
  • Global Burden
  • The Global Burden of Disease 2010 study found that elevated BMI was the leading risk factor for disability-adjusted life years in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) (10). (cdc.gov)
  • The latest global estimates for the state of the world's health from the Global Burden of Disease study (GBD), published in a special issue of The Lancet , highlight that global progress in health is not inevitable. (eurekalert.org)
  • prevention
  • World leaders joined Health and Development Ministers in the consensus adoption of a wide-ranging Political Declaration on the prevention and control of non-communicable diseases at the opening of the General Assembly's first ever summit on the deadly chronic illnesses. (un.org)
  • Public health aims to improve the quality of life through prevention and treatment of disease, including mental health. (wikipedia.org)
  • Common public health initiatives include promoting handwashing and breastfeeding, delivery of vaccinations, suicide prevention and distribution of condoms to control the spread of sexually transmitted diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • Public health plays an important role in disease prevention efforts in both the developing world and in developed countries, through local health systems and non-governmental organizations. (wikipedia.org)
  • The United States Public Health Service (PHS), led by the Surgeon General of the United States, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, headquartered in Atlanta, are involved with several international health activities, in addition to their national duties. (wikipedia.org)
  • In Canada, the Public Health Agency of Canada is the national agency responsible for public health, emergency preparedness and response, and infectious and chronic disease control and prevention. (wikipedia.org)
  • In these high risk groups, both prevention with aspirin and regular colonoscopies are recommended. (wikipedia.org)
  • preventable
  • Often referred to as "lifestyle" diseases because the majority of them were preventable, illnesses from smoking, alcohol abuse, poor diets and physical inactivity killed some 36 million people a year, mostly in low and middle-income countries where they disproportionately affected people under 60. (un.org)
  • Referred to as a "lifestyle" disease, because the majority of these diseases are preventable illnesses, the most common causes for non-communicable diseases (NCD) include tobacco use (smoking), alcohol abuse, poor diets (high consumption of sugar, salt, saturated fats, and trans fatty acids) and physical inactivity. (wikipedia.org)
  • Many diseases are preventable through simple, nonmedical methods. (wikipedia.org)
  • epidemic
  • Proclaiming the spread of non-communicable diseases a socio-economic and development challenge of "epidemic proportions," Governments today pledged to work with the United Nations to adopt before the end of 2012 targets to combat heart disease, cancers, diabetes and lung disease and to devise voluntary policies that cut smoking and slashed the high salt, sugar and fat content in foods that caused them. (un.org)
  • Emerging adverse trends could lead to negative shifts over time if action is not taken - for example, conflict and terrorism is an increasing threat to global health (with numbers of related deaths increasing by 118% between 2007-2017), and an era-defining epidemic of opioid dependence continues - with more than 4 million new cases and around 110,000 deaths in 2017. (eurekalert.org)
  • health
  • The co-existing conditions could include diseases , disorders , illnesses or other chronic health problems. (enca.com)
  • The concept of having two or more chronic health conditions at the same time is called multimorbidity. (enca.com)
  • The psychological burden often manifests as depression with mental health conditions frequently being associated with multimorbidity , which are often neglected or poorly managed. (enca.com)
  • More generally, the high self-management requirements and multiple drug prescriptions associated with multimorbidity can lead to poorer health outcomes for patients. (enca.com)
  • An excellent foundation […], we must act together to carry out its provisions and bring non-communicable diseases into our broader global health and development agenda," he declared. (un.org)
  • The Assembly noted with "grave concern" the vicious cycle by which poverty, chronic diseases and other risk factors fed off each other, creating a deadly spiral of sickness and deprivation, which, among other things, negatively affected women, exacerbated the impacts of HIV/AIDS, wreaked havoc on fragile health-care systems and undermined development gains. (un.org)
  • Hopefully, in the near future, health insurance companies that are established in emerging countries may agree to cover the costs of genetic diagnostic testing of their clients, and thus offer this new technology to patients and their at-risk relatives. (scielo.br)
  • The second chosen free-to-view review is entitled: Looking behind the bars: emerging health issues for people in prison (pages 15) by Stürup-Toft, O'Moore and Plugge from Public Health England, UK. (deepdyve.com)
  • These individuals experience a higher burden of communicable and non-communicable disease, mental health and substance misuse problems than the general population and often come from marginalized and underserved groups in the community. (deepdyve.com)
  • The fourth review is entitled: A review of systemic anticancer therapy in disease palliation (pages 43) by Usborne and Mullard from Betsi Cadwaladr University Health Board, Wales, UK They say that Systemic anticancer therapy (SACT) is a collective term to describe the growing number of differing therapies used in malignancy to achieve palliation. (deepdyve.com)
  • Data on sociodemographic characteristics, health-related habits and behaviors, diet, physical activity, chronic diseases, access to and use of health care, and anthropometric measurements were collected through computer-assisted personal interviews. (cdc.gov)
  • Whereas it once was associated with wealth and prosperity for men and with health and reproduction abilities for women, it is now perceived as a health problem and a risk factor for many diseases (7). (cdc.gov)
  • In the present study, we sought to examine the prevalence and regional variation in key management practices in Egyptian health facilities within three domains: supervision of the facility from the Ministry of Health and Population (MOHP), managerial processes, and patient and community involvement in care. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The GBD is the only annual, comprehensive, peer-reviewed assessment of global trends in health, providing global and national estimates for around 280 causes of death, 359 diseases and injuries, and 84 risk factors in 195 countries and territories worldwide. (eurekalert.org)
  • The committee first outlined four priority areas for action: 1) achieving global security, 2) maintaining a sustained response to the continuous threats of communicable diseases, 3) saving and improving the lives of women and children, and 4) promoting cardiovascular health and preventing cancer. (medindia.net)
  • The public health care system has a high priority from the Cambodian government and with international help and assistance, Cambodia has seen some major and continuous improvements in the health profile of its population since the 1980s, with a steadily rising life expectancy. (wikipedia.org)
  • With this transition, the health care system in Tunisia is challenged with the expansion of chronic disease. (cdc.gov)
  • The major CVD risk factors - high blood cholesterol, high blood pressure, cigarette smoking, physical inactivity, and unhealthy diet - satisfy the public health criteria of causality (19). (cdc.gov)
  • Its discontinuance by PAHO notwithstanding, monitoring and evaluation of DOTA found that it met its short term targets in most countries: preparation of national estimates of disease burden, development and implementation of national strategies and plans to deal with diabetes, and recognition of diabetes as a public health problem. (wikipedia.org)
  • The WHO's World Health Report 2002 identified five important risk factors for non-communicable disease in the top ten leading risks to health. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mozambique faces a number of ongoing health challenges including both infectious and chronic disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • Limited access to quality food and water, high levels of poverty and inaccessible health services influence health and prevalence of disease among people in Mozambique. (wikipedia.org)
  • and (2) preventing and slowing the spread of sexually transmitted diseases around the country through public health campaigns that increased public knowledge about modes of transmission and personal protection against STDs. (wikipedia.org)
  • Additionally, the paper found that new and reemerging infectious diseases will pose a rising global health threat and will complicate US and global security over the next 20 years. (wikipedia.org)
  • Public health is "the science and art of preventing disease, prolonging life and promoting human health through organized efforts and informed choices of society, organizations, public and private, communities and individuals. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is not merely the absence of disease or infirmity, according to the World Health Organization. (wikipedia.org)
  • The focus of a public health intervention is to prevent and manage diseases, injuries and other health conditions through surveillance of cases and the promotion of healthy behaviors, communities and environments. (wikipedia.org)
  • Most governments recognize the importance of public health programs in reducing the incidence of disease, disability, and the effects of aging and other physical and mental health conditions, although public health generally receives significantly less government funding compared with medicine. (wikipedia.org)
  • Public health programs providing vaccinations have made strides in promoting health, including the eradication of smallpox, a disease that plagued humanity for thousands of years. (wikipedia.org)
  • The World Health Organization (WHO) defined human health in its broader sense in its 1948 constitution as "a state of complete physical, mental, and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity. (wikipedia.org)
  • health was seen as a state of normal function that could be disrupted from time to time by disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • Just as there was a shift from viewing disease as a state to thinking of it as a process, the same shift happened in definitions of health. (wikipedia.org)
  • Studies have shown that high levels of stress can affect human health. (wikipedia.org)
  • It may also help prevent stress[citation needed] and depression, increase quality of sleep and act as a non-pharmaceutical sleep aid to treat diseases such as insomnia, help promote or maintain positive self-esteem, improve mental health, maintain steady digestion and treat constipation and gas, regulate fertility health, and augment an individual's sex appeal or body image. (wikipedia.org)
  • Tertiary health programs address existing health problems, and aim to help control or reduce symptoms, or to help slow the progression of a disease or condition. (wikipedia.org)
  • adults
  • We assessed the prevalence and risk factors of CKD among adults in urban Cameroon. (biomedcentral.com)
  • There is a high prevalence of CKD in urban adults Cameroonian, driven essentially by the commonest risk factors for CKD. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Epidemiologic studies show high levels of CVD risk factors among Tunisian adults and children. (cdc.gov)
  • Remarkably, Bangladesh is placed in top tenth position (7.1 million) among countries with highest number of diabetes adults in the world. (wikipedia.org)
  • In adults who go to the emergency department with an unclear cause of pain, about 30% have pain due to coronary artery disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • threat
  • The 65-paragraph text, the centrepiece of the two-day meeting, acknowledged that the global burden and threat of non-communicable diseases "constitutes one of the major challenges for development in the twenty-first century" and notes the Assembly's profound concern at the sharp increase in deaths and disability they caused. (un.org)
  • This paper examined the re-emergence of the threat from infectious diseases worldwide and its implications for the United States. (wikipedia.org)
  • risk
  • Non-communicable diseases and chronic communicable diseases co-occur, and the risk factors , such as alcohol and tobacco use, associated with them are often shared. (enca.com)
  • The present report presents findings from a study on the prevalence and risk factors of CKD in urban Cameroon. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Africans with HIV/HBV may be at significantly greater risk of liver disease than co-infected individuals in developed countries because they are infected with HBV much longer than HIV and are frequently exposed to other competing risks of liver injury. (northwestern.edu)
  • Half of all global deaths were caused by just four risk factors in 2017 - high blood pressure, smoking, high blood glucose, and high body mass index (BMI). (eurekalert.org)
  • Slow walking speed might just help determine the risk of chronic illness, hospitalization and sometimes even death. (medindia.net)
  • Evidence shows that several risk factors and conditions are commonly associated with major chronic diseases. (cdc.gov)
  • Integrated actions against selected risk factors (i.e., smoking, physical inactivity, and unhealthy diet), implemented within the social context, can lead to the reduction of major chronic diseases. (cdc.gov)
  • The risk factors for chronic disease are also well known in most industrialized countries (6-11), and knowledge of risk factors has led to implementation of effective preventive programs (12,13). (cdc.gov)
  • Among dominant identified risk factor of burden of diseases in South Asian countries, Diabetes is placed in seventh position. (wikipedia.org)
  • It has been estimated that if the primary risk factors were eliminated, 80% of the cases of heart disease, stroke and type 2 diabetes and 40% of cancers could be prevented. (wikipedia.org)
  • Interventions targeting the main risk factors could have a significant impact on reducing the burden of disease worldwide. (wikipedia.org)
  • Coronary artery disease has a number of well determined risk factors. (wikipedia.org)
  • Having a type A behavior pattern, a group of personality characteristics including time urgency, competitiveness, hostility, and impatience, is linked to an increased risk of coronary disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • Another risk factor is inflammatory bowel disease, which includes Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. (wikipedia.org)
  • While rectal bleeding or anemia are high-risk features in those over the age of 50, other commonly described symptoms including weight loss and change in bowel habit are typically only concerning if associated with bleeding. (wikipedia.org)
  • Seroprevalence of Streptococcus bovis/gallolyticus is considered as a candidate practical marker for the early prediction of an underlying bowel lesion at high risk population. (wikipedia.org)
  • People with inflammatory bowel disease (ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease) are at increased risk of colon cancer. (wikipedia.org)
  • The risk increases the longer a person has the disease, and the worse the severity of inflammation. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is recommended for those at high risk or people traveling to areas where the disease is common. (wikipedia.org)
  • The risk of death may be as high as 20% without treatment. (wikipedia.org)
  • cancer
  • Some 4 million Americans are chronic carriers of the hepatitis C virus, a significant cause of liver cancer and cirrhosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • People with inflammatory bowel disease account for less than 2% of colon cancer cases yearly. (wikipedia.org)
  • In those with Crohn's disease 2% get colorectal cancer after 10 years, 8% after 20 years, and 18% after 30 years. (wikipedia.org)
  • reduction
  • The region has experienced a 74 per cent reduction in stunting prevalence (low height for age) over a 24 year period, the largest reduction for any region. (unicef.org)
  • unwarranted variation
  • As these guidelines were designed in response to the American Physical Therapy Association's objective of standardizing clinical care and reducing unwarranted variation, clinical practice guidelines have started emerging utilizing the most current evidence-based research ( 5 ). (frontiersin.org)
  • refers
  • Coronary artery disease (CAD), also known as ischemic heart disease (IHD), refers to a group of diseases which includes stable angina, unstable angina, myocardial infarction, and sudden cardiac death. (wikipedia.org)
  • lifestyles
  • It stated that infectious diseases were a leading cause of death, accounting for a quarter to a third of the estimated 54 million deaths worldwide in 1998, and that the spread of infectious diseases results as much from changes in human behavior-including lifestyles and land use patterns, increased trade and travel, and inappropriate use of antibiotic drugs-as from mutations in pathogens. (wikipedia.org)
  • progression
  • In this study, liver disease will be examined in HIV, HBV and HIV/HBV co-infected individuals before and after initiation of HBV-active therapies to determine the amount of liver disease at baseline and the effect of HBV-active therapies on liver disease progression. (northwestern.edu)
  • In contrast, women who had high levels of work-related stress experienced a decrease in the diameter of their blood vessels and significantly increased disease progression. (wikipedia.org)
  • acute
  • Although multifactorial in nature, one factor that has been attributed to the development of chronic pain is poor management of acute and subacute pain ( 2 - 4 ). (frontiersin.org)
  • people
  • Chronic musculoskeletal pain (excluding arthritic pain) accounts for a third of all disability claims in the United States with over 7.6 million people on long-term disability for spine problems alone ( 1 ). (frontiersin.org)
  • Each year in the United States, about 400 cases are reported and it is estimated that the disease occurs in about 6,000 people. (wikipedia.org)
  • study
  • The focus of this study is on the user experience: How aware are patients of the causes of and cures for their diseases, and how well are they served by the healthcare providers in their countries? (slideshare.net)
  • The proposed study "An Assessment of Liver Disease in HIV-infected and HIV/HBV co-infected Tanzanians" aims to assess liver fibrosis in HIV/HBV co-infected as well as HIV and HBV mono- infected individuals in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. (northwestern.edu)
  • cholesterol
  • The fourth pattern is one of degenerative diseases onset by a diet high in total fat, cholesterol, sugar, and other refined carbohydrates and low in polyunsaturated fatty acids and fiber. (wikipedia.org)
  • High blood cholesterol (specifically, serum LDL concentrations). (wikipedia.org)
  • High levels of lipoprotein(a), a compound formed when LDL cholesterol combines with a protein known as apolipoprotein(a). (wikipedia.org)
  • Sugar
  • Referred to as a "lifestyle" disease, because the majority of these diseases are preventable illnesses, the most common causes for non-communicable diseases (NCD) include tobacco use (smoking), alcohol abuse, poor diets (high consumption of sugar, salt, saturated fats, and trans fatty acids) and physical inactivity. (wikipedia.org)
  • The fourth pattern is one of degenerative diseases onset by a diet high in total fat, cholesterol, sugar, and other refined carbohydrates and low in polyunsaturated fatty acids and fiber. (wikipedia.org)
  • Therefore, co-jointly with India and Sri Lanka, Bangladesh constituted 99.0% of the adult with high blood sugar in South Asian region. (wikipedia.org)
  • Symptoms
  • Symptoms are similar to that of many other infectious diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • These variations in the reported prevalence of asymptomatic (presenting no symptoms of disease) colonization could be related to the different detection methods used, and differences in populations studied. (wikipedia.org)
  • While rectal bleeding or anemia are high-risk features in those over the age of 50, other commonly described symptoms including weight loss and change in bowel habit are typically only concerning if associated with bleeding. (wikipedia.org)
  • populations
  • It was once believed that current nutrition transition was endemic only to industrialized nations like the United States, but increasing research has indicated that not only is nutrition transition occurring most rapidly in low- and middle-income developing countries, the stress of its effects stands to burden the poorest populations of these countries the most as well. (wikipedia.org)
  • degenerative
  • Rheumatic and musculoskeletal diseases (RMDs) represent a multitude of degenerative, inflammatory and auto-immune conditions affecting millions of people worldwide. (springer.com)
  • The term rheumatic and musculoskeletal diseases (RMDs) largely encompasses over one hundred degenerative, inflammatory and auto-immune conditions which in their most advanced form are associated with severe pain, joint damage, disability and even death. (springer.com)
  • The fifth pattern, and most recently emerging pattern, is characterized by a behavioral change reflective of a desire to prevent or delay degenerative diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • known
  • 1,2) Nearly half of all human infectious diseases known today can be classified as emerging. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • High levels of lipoprotein(a), a compound formed when LDL cholesterol combines with a protein known as apolipoprotein(a). (wikipedia.org)
  • Cryptosporidiosis, also known as crypto, is a parasitic disease caused by Cryptosporidium, a genus of protozoan parasites in the phylum Apicomplexa. (wikipedia.org)
  • Group B streptococcus infection, also known as Group B streptococcal disease, is the infection caused by the bacterium Streptococcus agalactiae (S. agalactiae) (also known as group B streptococcus or GBS). (wikipedia.org)
  • From historical aspect, it is known that Communicable diseases formed major bulk of total diseases in developing and tropical countries such as Bangladesh. (wikipedia.org)
  • population
  • Use of social constructivism lens enabled to classify emerging themes into population coverage, health services coverage and financial protection issues. (springer.com)
  • Some micronutrient deficiencies have declined, such as Vitamin A deficiency, due to the high coverage with Vitamin A supplementation supported by UNICEF, while in many countries the population is also no longer iodine deficient thanks to UNICEF-supported efforts on universal salt iodization. (unicef.org)
  • The authors argue that the health impacts of the supplemental imported diet, combined with migration to population centers, may result in an even greater prevalence of chronic diseases, and exert pressures that lead to more communicable disease, further exacerbating the syndemics in the Marshall Islands. (hhrjournal.org)
  • In the post-WWII period, the US tested most of its high megatonnage nuclear weapons in the Marshall Islands, resulting in population relocation and ensuing dependence on imported foods. (hhrjournal.org)
  • Construction of reservoirs is constrained by lack of good reservoir sites, high density of population at possible reservoir sites and expected short reservoir lifetimes due to siltation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Seroprevalence of Streptococcus bovis/gallolyticus is considered as a candidate practical marker for the early prediction of an underlying bowel lesion at high risk population. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dominant
  • Inherited genetic errors from parents: Dominant genetic diseases, such as Huntingtons, require the inheritance of one erroneous gene to be expressed. (wikipedia.org)
  • shift
  • Just as there was a shift from viewing disease as a state to thinking of it as a process, the same shift happened in definitions of health. (wikipedia.org)
  • poor
  • Women in Jakarta report spending US$11 per month on boiling water, implying a significant burden for the poor. (wikipedia.org)
  • major
  • The long-term vision of the WFRMD is to increase perception of the RMDs as a major burden to society and to explore potential opportunities to improve global and local RMD care. (springer.com)
  • Worldwide
  • Interventions targeting the main risk factors could have a significant impact on reducing the burden of disease worldwide. (wikipedia.org)
  • This paper examined the re-emergence of the threat from infectious diseases worldwide and its implications for the United States. (wikipedia.org)
  • It stated that infectious diseases were a leading cause of death, accounting for a quarter to a third of the estimated 54 million deaths worldwide in 1998, and that the spread of infectious diseases results as much from changes in human behavior-including lifestyles and land use patterns, increased trade and travel, and inappropriate use of antibiotic drugs-as from mutations in pathogens. (wikipedia.org)
  • concentrations
  • As expected in nutrition studies, blood omega-3 concentrations overlapped between the high- and low-dose treatments although mean concentrations were higher in the high-dose group. (dsm.com)
  • High blood cholesterol (specifically, serum LDL concentrations). (wikipedia.org)
  • increase
  • It may also help prevent stress[citation needed] and depression, increase quality of sleep and act as a non-pharmaceutical sleep aid to treat diseases such as insomnia, help promote or maintain positive self-esteem, improve mental health, maintain steady digestion and treat constipation and gas, regulate fertility health, and augment an individual's sex appeal or body image. (wikipedia.org)
  • significant
  • These diseases will endanger US citizens at home and abroad, threaten US armed forces deployed overseas, and exacerbate social and political instability in key countries and regions in which the United States has significant interests. (wikipedia.org)
  • By 2015 via Millennium development Goals, where communicable diseases were targeted, Bangladesh attained almost significant control on communicable diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • countries
  • The costs of the resulting chronic non-communicable diseases represents a huge drain on countries' resources. (unicef.org)
  • Specifically the term is used for the transition of developing countries from traditional diets high in cereal and fiber to more Western pattern diets high in sugars, fat, and animal-source food. (wikipedia.org)
  • genetic
  • Recessive genetic diseases require the inheritance of erroneous genes to be expressed and this is one reason they work together. (wikipedia.org)
  • infection
  • While in Spain Dr Willis became ill with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) brought on by a viral infection. (thecancerrevolution.co.uk)
  • Quraishi and colleagues reported that vitamin D -deficient patients are twice as likely to develop a hospital-acquired infection (vs those with highest vitamin D status). (dsm.com)
  • After ingestion if the immune system is unable to stop the infection, the bacterium will multiply and then spread to the bloodstream, after which the first signs of disease are observed in the form of fever. (wikipedia.org)
  • diets
  • The first pattern is that of collecting food, a characterization of hunter-gatherers, whose diets were high in carbohydrates and low in fat, especially saturated fat. (wikipedia.org)