• malaria
  • Of the seven biggest killers worldwide, TB, malaria, hepatitis, and, in particular, HIV/AIDS continue to surge, with HIV/AIDS and TB likely to account for the overwhelming majority of deaths from infectious diseases in developing countries by 2020. (wikipedia.org)
  • Malaria is a mosquito-borne infectious disease affecting humans and other animals caused by parasitic protozoans (a group of single-celled microorganisms) belonging to the Plasmodium type. (wikipedia.org)
  • Several medications are available to prevent malaria in travellers to areas where the disease is common. (wikipedia.org)
  • Occasional doses of the combination medication sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine are recommended in infants and after the first trimester of pregnancy in areas with high rates of malaria. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is recommended that in areas where the disease is common, malaria is confirmed if possible before treatment is started due to concerns of increasing drug resistance. (wikipedia.org)
  • Initial manifestations of the disease-common to all malaria species-are similar to flu-like symptoms, and can resemble other conditions such as sepsis, gastroenteritis, and viral diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • prevention
  • Global Health Committee has suggested the US government to prioritize its health resources toward detecting and treating non-communicable diseases such as cardiovascular disease and as well continue to expand it's prevention and eradication programs of infectious diseases on a global scale. (medindia.net)
  • In the United States and Western Europe, IHD is growing among low-income groups, but primary prevention has delayed the disease to later in life in all socioeconomic groups. (mhmedical.com)
  • Public health aims to improve the quality of life through prevention and treatment of disease, including mental health. (wikipedia.org)
  • Common public health initiatives include promoting handwashing and breastfeeding, delivery of vaccinations, suicide prevention and distribution of condoms to control the spread of sexually transmitted diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • Public health plays an important role in disease prevention efforts in both the developing world and in developed countries, through local health systems and non-governmental organizations. (wikipedia.org)
  • The United States Public Health Service (PHS), led by the Surgeon General of the United States, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, headquartered in Atlanta, are involved with several international health activities, in addition to their national duties. (wikipedia.org)
  • In Canada, the Public Health Agency of Canada is the national agency responsible for public health, emergency preparedness and response, and infectious and chronic disease control and prevention. (wikipedia.org)
  • In these high risk groups, both prevention with aspirin and regular colonoscopies are recommended. (wikipedia.org)
  • World Health Organ
  • It took the higher income countries 50 years to get to this point, it's taken low and middle income countries just 15 years,' says Dr Gojka Roglic of the Department for Management of Non-Communicable Diseases at the World Health Organization . (geographical.co.uk)
  • It is not merely the absence of disease or infirmity, according to the World Health Organization. (wikipedia.org)
  • The World Health Organization (WHO) defined human health in its broader sense in its 1948 constitution as "a state of complete physical, mental, and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity. (wikipedia.org)
  • population
  • In the present study, we sought to examine the prevalence and regional variation in key management practices in Egyptian health facilities within three domains: supervision of the facility from the Ministry of Health and Population (MOHP), managerial processes, and patient and community involvement in care. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Some micronutrient deficiencies have declined, such as Vitamin A deficiency, due to the high coverage with Vitamin A supplementation supported by UNICEF, while in many countries the population is also no longer iodine deficient thanks to UNICEF-supported efforts on universal salt iodization. (unicef.org)
  • The Cambodian population and healthcare system struggles with many of the diseases common to the Tropics, in particular in rural areas. (wikipedia.org)
  • The public health care system has a high priority from the Cambodian government and with international help and assistance, Cambodia has seen some major and continuous improvements in the health profile of its population since the 1980s, with a steadily rising life expectancy. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dual Burden of disease refers to the prevalence of both infectious and chronic disease in each population, mainly due to shifts in diet and physical activity pattern in response to globalization, especially in the low and middle countries. (wikipedia.org)
  • In general, the adult mortality rate over the six-year period was 8.5 per 1000 adult population, higher for males (9.6) and rural residents (8.6) than females (7.5) and urban residents (8.2). (biomedcentral.com)
  • Yet, only 34 countries - representing 15% of the world population - have high-quality cause of death data and almost all of these data are derived from high-income countries. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Seroprevalence of Streptococcus bovis/gallolyticus is considered as a candidate practical marker for the early prediction of an underlying bowel lesion at high risk population. (wikipedia.org)
  • mortality due
  • The increasing TB-related mortality in the study years as well as the relative high mortality due to CLD among adults of age 15-49 years should be further investigated and triangulated with health service data to understand the root cause of death. (biomedcentral.com)
  • shift
  • Just as there was a shift from viewing disease as a state to thinking of it as a process, the same shift happened in definitions of health. (wikipedia.org)
  • symptoms
  • These variations in the reported prevalence of asymptomatic (presenting no symptoms of disease) colonization could be related to the different detection methods used, and differences in populations studied. (wikipedia.org)
  • Symptoms are similar to that of many other infectious diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • While rectal bleeding or anemia are high-risk features in those over the age of 50, other commonly described symptoms including weight loss and change in bowel habit are typically only concerning if associated with bleeding. (wikipedia.org)
  • spread of sexually transmit
  • and (2) preventing and slowing the spread of sexually transmitted diseases around the country through public health campaigns that increased public knowledge about modes of transmission and personal protection against STDs. (wikipedia.org)
  • unwarranted variation
  • As these guidelines were designed in response to the American Physical Therapy Association's objective of standardizing clinical care and reducing unwarranted variation, clinical practice guidelines have started emerging utilizing the most current evidence-based research ( 5 ). (frontiersin.org)
  • risk
  • Waist circumference was measured to classify the children as having a high or very high risk for metabolic disease. (scielo.org.za)
  • Africans with HIV/HBV may be at significantly greater risk of liver disease than co-infected individuals in developed countries because they are infected with HBV much longer than HIV and are frequently exposed to other competing risks of liver injury. (northwestern.edu)
  • Slow walking speed might just help determine the risk of chronic illness, hospitalization and sometimes even death. (medindia.net)
  • Evidence shows that several risk factors and conditions are commonly associated with major chronic diseases. (cdc.gov)
  • Integrated actions against selected risk factors (i.e., smoking, physical inactivity, and unhealthy diet), implemented within the social context, can lead to the reduction of major chronic diseases. (cdc.gov)
  • The risk factors for chronic disease are also well known in most industrialized countries (6-11), and knowledge of risk factors has led to implementation of effective preventive programs (12,13). (cdc.gov)
  • The major CVD risk factors - high blood cholesterol, high blood pressure, cigarette smoking, physical inactivity, and unhealthy diet - satisfy the public health criteria of causality (19). (cdc.gov)
  • The WHO's World Health Report 2002 identified five important risk factors for non-communicable disease in the top ten leading risks to health. (wikipedia.org)
  • Interventions targeting the main risk factors could have a significant impact on reducing the burden of disease worldwide. (wikipedia.org)
  • Another risk factor is inflammatory bowel disease, which includes Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. (wikipedia.org)
  • The risk increases the longer a person has the disease, and the worse the severity of inflammation. (wikipedia.org)
  • The risk of disease can be reduced by preventing mosquito bites through the use of mosquito nets and insect repellents, or with mosquito control measures such as spraying insecticides and draining standing water. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is recommended for those at high risk or people traveling to areas where the disease is common. (wikipedia.org)
  • The risk of death may be as high as 20% without treatment. (wikipedia.org)
  • intervention
  • The focus of a public health intervention is to prevent and manage diseases, injuries and other health conditions through surveillance of cases and the promotion of healthy behaviors, communities and environments. (wikipedia.org)
  • significantly
  • Significantly more boys (23.0%) were wasted than girls (10%) and severe stunting was also significantly higher in boys than in girls (10.3% and 4.2%, respectively). (scielo.org.za)
  • In contrast, women who had high levels of work-related stress experienced a decrease in the diameter of their blood vessels and significantly increased disease progression. (wikipedia.org)
  • Most governments recognize the importance of public health programs in reducing the incidence of disease, disability, and the effects of aging and other physical and mental health conditions, although public health generally receives significantly less government funding compared with medicine. (wikipedia.org)
  • include
  • Anaerobic exercise also include weight training, functional training, eccentric training, Interval training, sprinting, and high-intensity interval training increase short-term muscle strength. (wikipedia.org)
  • Health
  • The Global health committee mainly focuses on the detection and management of cardiovascular disease and offers a road map for achieving better outcomes in preventing and treating heart disease. (medindia.net)
  • Specifically, in this report, the committee focuses on the detection and management of cardiovascular disease and offers a roadmap for achieving better outcomes in preventing and treating heart disease, including through screening, accelerated drug development, digital health and smart financing strategies. (medindia.net)
  • With this transition, the health care system in Tunisia is challenged with the expansion of chronic disease. (cdc.gov)
  • In cases where drugs aren't reaching people who need them, the reason is not high prices, but rather dysfunctional health systems. (thenewdawnliberia.com)
  • With better roads and more fully developed transportation systems, emerging economies could boost not just health outcomes, but also economic and educational opportunities. (thenewdawnliberia.com)
  • Two or three physicians independently assigned cause of death based on the completed VA forms in accordance with the World Health Organization's International Classification of Diseases. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Mozambique faces a number of ongoing health challenges including both infectious and chronic disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • Limited access to quality food and water, high levels of poverty and inaccessible health services influence health and prevalence of disease among people in Mozambique. (wikipedia.org)
  • Additionally, the paper found that new and reemerging infectious diseases will pose a rising global health threat and will complicate US and global security over the next 20 years. (wikipedia.org)
  • Public health is "the science and art of preventing disease, prolonging life and promoting human health through organized efforts and informed choices of society, organizations, public and private, communities and individuals. (wikipedia.org)
  • Public health programs providing vaccinations have made strides in promoting health, including the eradication of smallpox, a disease that plagued humanity for thousands of years. (wikipedia.org)
  • health was seen as a state of normal function that could be disrupted from time to time by disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • Studies have shown that high levels of stress can affect human health. (wikipedia.org)
  • It may also help prevent stress[citation needed] and depression, increase quality of sleep and act as a non-pharmaceutical sleep aid to treat diseases such as insomnia, help promote or maintain positive self-esteem, improve mental health, maintain steady digestion and treat constipation and gas, regulate fertility health, and augment an individual's sex appeal or body image. (wikipedia.org)
  • people
  • Chronic musculoskeletal pain (excluding arthritic pain) accounts for a third of all disability claims in the United States with over 7.6 million people on long-term disability for spine problems alone ( 1 ). (frontiersin.org)
  • Yet it is far from only being a disease of the developing world - more than 24,000 people (65 people a day) die before their time from it each year in England and Wales and one in 16 people in the UK has it. (geographical.co.uk)
  • People who participate in moderate to high levels of physical exercise have a lower mortality rate compared to individuals who by comparison are not physically active. (wikipedia.org)
  • If not properly treated, people may have recurrences of the disease months later. (wikipedia.org)
  • Each year in the United States, about 400 cases are reported and it is estimated that the disease occurs in about 6,000 people. (wikipedia.org)
  • reduction
  • The region has experienced a 74 per cent reduction in stunting prevalence (low height for age) over a 24 year period, the largest reduction for any region. (unicef.org)
  • common
  • IHD is the most common, serious, chronic, life-threatening illness in the United States, where 13 million persons have IHD, >6 million have angina pectoris, and >7 million have sustained a myocardial infarction. (mhmedical.com)
  • Genetic
  • Genetic factors, a high-fat and energy-rich diet, smoking, and a sedentary lifestyle are associated with the emergence of IHD ( Chap. 291e ) . (mhmedical.com)
  • Inherited genetic errors from parents: Dominant genetic diseases, such as Huntingtons, require the inheritance of one erroneous gene to be expressed. (wikipedia.org)
  • Recessive genetic diseases require the inheritance of erroneous genes to be expressed and this is one reason they work together. (wikipedia.org)
  • economies
  • With urbanization in countries with emerging economies and a growing middle class, elements of the energy-rich Western diet are being adopted. (mhmedical.com)
  • lifestyles
  • It stated that infectious diseases were a leading cause of death, accounting for a quarter to a third of the estimated 54 million deaths worldwide in 1998, and that the spread of infectious diseases results as much from changes in human behavior-including lifestyles and land use patterns, increased trade and travel, and inappropriate use of antibiotic drugs-as from mutations in pathogens. (wikipedia.org)
  • liver
  • The proposed study "An Assessment of Liver Disease in HIV-infected and HIV/HBV co-infected Tanzanians" aims to assess liver fibrosis in HIV/HBV co-infected as well as HIV and HBV mono- infected individuals in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. (northwestern.edu)
  • In this study, liver disease will be examined in HIV, HBV and HIV/HBV co-infected individuals before and after initiation of HBV-active therapies to determine the amount of liver disease at baseline and the effect of HBV-active therapies on liver disease progression. (northwestern.edu)