Loading...
  • vitro
  • hemolysis resulting from in vitro addition of phenylhydrazine to blood with red blood cells that are deficient in G6PD, with the appearance of Heinz-Ehrlich bodies. (drugs.com)
  • hemolysis resulting from in vitro addition of phenylhydrazine to blood with red blood cells that are deficient in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), with the appearance of Heinz-Ehrlich bodies. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • In vitro hemolysis can be caused by improper technique during collection of blood specimens, by the effects of mechanical processing of blood, or by bacterial action in cultured blood specimens. (wikipedia.org)
  • Most causes of in vitro hemolysis are related to specimen collection. (wikipedia.org)
  • In vitro hemolysis during specimen collection can cause inaccurate laboratory test results by contaminating the surrounding plasma with the contents of hemolyzed red blood cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Contrary to this belief, theoretical calculation and in vitro experiment both showed the exact opposite: namely, that shear stress and hence hemolysis decrease with decreasing needle bore (but the decrease can be clinically insignificant). (wikipedia.org)
  • hemolysin
  • The CAMP test is a test to identify Group B β-streptococci based on their formation of a substance (CAMP factor) that enlarges the area of hemolysis formed by β-hemolysin from Staphylococcus aureus. (wikipedia.org)
  • shear
  • We believed the PI to be secondary to the jet from the outflow cannula of the RVAD on the pulmonic valve and also likely responsible for the high shear stresses and hemolysis. (hindawi.com)
  • clinical
  • In agreement with these results, a subsequent clinical trial found that 21G, 23G, and 25G butterflies connected directly to vacuum tubes caused the same amount of hemolysis and gave the same coagulation panel test results. (wikipedia.org)
  • turbulence
  • We speculate that the high velocity jet of blood emanating from the outflow cannula caused turbulence above the pulmonary valve, leading to PI and hemolysis. (hindawi.com)
  • suffer
  • Vienna, 31 October 2016) Worldwide, millions of people suffer from hemolysis, the breakdown of red blood cells, such as those afflicted with sickle-cell disease, malaria or sepsis. (meduniwien.ac.at)
  • The loss of cytoskeletal resilience results in life-threatening conditions for millions of people worldwide, which suffer from hemolysis due to systemic inflammation (sepsis) or disorders such as sickle-cell disease, or malaria. (meduniwien.ac.at)
  • frequent
  • SCD is a hemoglobinopathy clinically characterized by chronic haemolysis , susceptibility to frequent infections, growth retardation, spleenic sequestration and intermittent episodes of painful vasoocclusive crisis affecting different organs. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • occurs
  • Hemolysis occurs as part of the natural life cycle of red blood cells, or it may be caused by certain conditions or drugs. (nih.gov)
  • infections
  • In the latest edition of Nature Immunology, Sylvia Knapp's Group at the CeMM Research Center for Molecular Medicine of the Austrian Academy of Sciences and the Medical University of Vienna, uncovers the molecular mechanisms that explain how hemolysis escalates the risk for infections. (meduniwien.ac.at)
  • For decades, iron has been considered the prime suspect responsible for the high rate of bacterial infections in patients with hemolysis (bursting of red blood cells). (meduniwien.ac.at)
  • Taking that into consideration, the traditional hypothesis predicted that since hemolysis leads to the release of iron-containing heme, the threat of serious bacterial infections in these patients was attributed to the excess availability of circulating iron (heme). (meduniwien.ac.at)
  • cells
  • Both had evidence of microvascular haemolysis with anaemia, increased bilirubin, increased lactate dehydrogenase and fragmented red cells on microscopy. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • We recently discovered that LtxA can also lyse red blood cells (RBCs) and hemolysis may be important for pathogenesis of A. actinomycetemcomitans. (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • Because the feeding process of the Plasmodium parasites damages red blood cells, malaria is sometimes called "parasitic hemolysis" in medical literature. (wikipedia.org)
  • means
  • Its measurement by means of the haemolysis index, that also has become available on coagulation analyzers (15), was proven to be reliable and practical (16), so that this practice should be encouraged to provide an objective and virtually incontestable measure of sample quality. (thefreedictionary.com)