• signs of hemolysis
  • The emergency physician has to think about this complication in case of hemoglobinuria and/or signs of hemolysis associated with a septic syndrome. (hindawi.com)
  • Patients at high risk of IVIG-associated hemolysis (defined as receipt of a 28-day cumulative dose of ≥ 2 g/kg, adjusted for ideal body weight, and non-O blood group) will be prospectively monitored using a standardized protocol for signs of hemolysis, and will be undergo additional testing for variables that have been hypothesized to increase the risk of hemolysis. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Measuring the level of haptoglobin in a patient's blood is ordered whenever a patient exhibits symptoms of anemia, such as pallor, fatigue, or shortness of breath, along with physical signs of hemolysis, such as jaundice or dark-colored urine. (wikipedia.org)
  • vitro hemolysis
  • Background: In vitro hemolysis, the prevailing cause of preanalytical error in routine laboratory diagnostics, might influence the reliability of several tests, affect the quality of the total testing process and jeopardize patient safety. (hu-berlin.de)
  • In vitro hemolysis can be caused by improper technique during collection of blood specimens, by the effects of mechanical processing of blood, or by bacterial action in cultured blood specimens. (wikipedia.org)
  • Most causes of in vitro hemolysis are related to specimen collection. (wikipedia.org)
  • In vitro hemolysis during specimen collection can cause inaccurate laboratory test results by contaminating the surrounding plasma with the contents of hemolyzed red blood cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • After the blood collection process, in vitro hemolysis can still occur in a sample due to external factors, such as prolonged storage, incorrect storage conditions (e.g. leaving an EDTA tube at room temperature rather than being refrigerated), and excessive physical forces by dropping or vigorously mixing the tube. (wikipedia.org)
  • serum
  • The pathophysiology of IVIG-associated hemolysis will be characterized by tracking changes in serum complement levels, performing extended cytokine profiling, and conducting mononuclear phagocyte activity assays using patient monocytes. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • The spiked serum samples were shipped to seven separate laboratories and the hemolysis index (HI) was tested in triplicate on the following analytical platforms: Roche Modular System P (n=4) and Integra 400 Plus (n=1), Siemens Dimension RxL (n=3), ADVIA 2400 (n=1) and ADVIA 1800 (n=1), Olympus AU 680 (n=1) and Coulter DXC 800 (n=1). (hu-berlin.de)
  • laboratory
  • Laboratory testing for hemolysis will be performed at baseline, immediately following the completed high-dose cycle (usually administered over 1-2 days), and then again at 5-10 days post-infusion. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Although laboratory instrumentation is now routinely equipped with systems capable of automatically testing and eventually correcting for hemolysis interference, to our knowledge there are no reports that have compared the efficiency of different analytical platforms for identifying and classifying specimens with hemolysis. (hu-berlin.de)
  • G6PD
  • hemolysis resulting from in vitro addition of phenylhydrazine to blood with red blood cells that are deficient in G6PD, with the appearance of Heinz-Ehrlich bodies. (drugs.com)
  • Individuals with a deficiency of G6PD cannot reduce oxidized glutathione to reduced glutathione, leading to oxidative damage and eventual hemolysis. (oncologynurseadvisor.com)
  • clinical
  • In agreement with these results, a subsequent clinical trial found that 21G, 23G, and 25G butterflies connected directly to vacuum tubes caused the same amount of hemolysis and gave the same coagulation panel test results. (wikipedia.org)
  • Staphylococcus
  • The CAMP test is a test to identify Group B β-streptococci based on their formation of a substance (CAMP factor) that enlarges the area of hemolysis formed by β-hemolysin from Staphylococcus aureus. (wikipedia.org)
  • suffer
  • Vienna, 31 October 2016) Worldwide, millions of people suffer from hemolysis, the breakdown of red blood cells, such as those afflicted with sickle-cell disease, malaria or sepsis. (meduniwien.ac.at)
  • The loss of cytoskeletal resilience results in life-threatening conditions for millions of people worldwide, which suffer from hemolysis due to systemic inflammation (sepsis) or disorders such as sickle-cell disease, or malaria. (meduniwien.ac.at)
  • frequent
  • SCD is a hemoglobinopathy clinically characterized by chronic haemolysis , susceptibility to frequent infections, growth retardation, spleenic sequestration and intermittent episodes of painful vasoocclusive crisis affecting different organs. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • occurs
  • Hemolysis occurs as part of the natural life cycle of red blood cells, or it may be caused by certain conditions or drugs. (nih.gov)
  • infections
  • In the latest edition of Nature Immunology, Sylvia Knapp's Group at the CeMM Research Center for Molecular Medicine of the Austrian Academy of Sciences and the Medical University of Vienna, uncovers the molecular mechanisms that explain how hemolysis escalates the risk for infections. (meduniwien.ac.at)
  • For decades, iron has been considered the prime suspect responsible for the high rate of bacterial infections in patients with hemolysis (bursting of red blood cells). (meduniwien.ac.at)
  • Taking that into consideration, the traditional hypothesis predicted that since hemolysis leads to the release of iron-containing heme, the threat of serious bacterial infections in these patients was attributed to the excess availability of circulating iron (heme). (meduniwien.ac.at)
  • hence
  • Contrary to this belief, theoretical calculation and in vitro experiment both showed the exact opposite: namely, that shear stress and hence hemolysis decrease with decreasing needle bore (but the decrease can be clinically insignificant). (wikipedia.org)
  • sometimes
  • The agars are well photographed to demonstrate the sometimes difficult to distinguish hemolysis patterns. (wisc-online.com)
  • Because the feeding process of the Plasmodium parasites damages red blood cells, malaria is sometimes called "parasitic hemolysis" in medical literature. (wikipedia.org)
  • This is sometimes called green hemolysis because of the color change in the agar. (wikipedia.org)
  • Beta hemolysis (β-hemolysis), sometimes called complete hemolysis, is a complete lysis of red cells in the media around and under the colonies: the area appears lightened (yellow) and transparent. (wikipedia.org)
  • risk
  • The authors discuss the potential risk and prevention of postoperative hemolysis in corrective surgery of the truncus arteriosus with truncal valve insufficiency. (biomedsearch.com)
  • means
  • Its measurement by means of the haemolysis index, that also has become available on coagulation analyzers (15), was proven to be reliable and practical (16), so that this practice should be encouraged to provide an objective and virtually incontestable measure of sample quality. (thefreedictionary.com)