• congestive heart f
  • A range of other outcomes/conditions may also be associated with modified (usually lower) HRV, including congestive heart failure, diabetic neuropathy, depression, post-cardiac transplant, susceptibility to SIDS and poor survival in premature babies. (wikipedia.org)
  • HRT can also be used to predict death in patients with congestive heart failure from a lethal arrhythmia. (wikipedia.org)
  • This is a frequent occurrence with pleural effusion, caused by congestive heart failure (CHF). (wikipedia.org)
  • beats
  • In general, it is estimated as the number of times the heart beats (or contracts) per minute (bpm). (buzzle.com)
  • The normal rate of heart beats for an adult man is about 70 bpm. (buzzle.com)
  • A plot of this averaged RR interval list (called a PVC tachogram) not only confirmed their observation that heart rate sped up for a few beats after a PVC, but highlighted another less obvious feature, that heart rate then slows down beyond what it was before the PVC, before returning to the original heart rate. (wikipedia.org)
  • The number of times your heart beats in one minute can tell a physician a lot about your health, including cardiovascular functioning, presence of infections and a snapshot of your overall fitness level. (livestrong.com)
  • Before getting out of bed after an evening of sleep, the heart beats an average of 60 to 80 times per minute, according to the American Heart Association. (livestrong.com)
  • A trained athlete may have a morning heart rate as low as 40 beats per minute, explains physical medicine and rehabilitation specialist Edward R. Laskowski, M.D., with the Mayo Clinic. (livestrong.com)
  • By counting the number of times your pulse beats -- on the underside of your wrist -- for 10 seconds and multiplying it by 6, you have your morning heart rate. (livestrong.com)
  • Diagnosis is typically by an electrocardiogram (ECG) which shows narrow QRS complexes and a fast heart rhythm typically between 150 and 240 beats per minute. (wikipedia.org)
  • cardiovascular
  • Nervous influence over the heartrate is centralized within the two paired cardiovascular centres of the medulla oblongata. (wikipedia.org)
  • Continuing the comparison between a psychophysiologist and a physiological psychologist, a psychophysiologist may look at how exposure to a stressful situation will produce a result in the cardiovascular system such as a change in heart rate (HR), vasodilation/vasoconstriction, myocardial contractility, or stroke volume. (wikipedia.org)
  • arteries
  • This results in a pulse (blood pressure) weaker than expected and triggers normal homeostatic mechanisms that try to compensate by constricting arteries and increasing heart rate (the turbulence onset part of HRT). (wikipedia.org)
  • The compensatory constriction of the arteries and increased heart rate frequently cause blood pressure to oveshoot normal values (overcompensates), and activate the baroreflex in reverse. (wikipedia.org)
  • cardiac
  • That is, a PVC interrupts the normal cardiac cycle, so the ventricles of the heart haven't had time to fill up to their normal level, before contracting and pumping their contents out. (wikipedia.org)
  • Physiological responses also can be measured via instruments that read bodily events such as heart rate change, electrodermal activity (EDA), muscle tension, and cardiac output. (wikipedia.org)
  • Holter
  • These thresholds were applied to Holter records from a total of 1191 patients who had experienced a heart attack. (wikipedia.org)
  • myocardial
  • Reduced HRV has been shown to be a predictor of mortality after myocardial infarction although others have shown that the information in HRV relevant to acute myocardial infarction survival is fully contained in the mean heart rate. (wikipedia.org)
  • pulse
  • If it is significantly darker, due the pulse causing a temporary increase in the amount of blood that is travelling through the measured area, that is counted as a heart pulse. (wikipedia.org)
  • I would report it that is a low pulse rate. (medhelp.org)
  • abnormal
  • There are recommended levels for normal heart rate, which help detect any abnormal signs of heart pumping. (buzzle.com)
  • As per medical experts, abnormal heart rates, either too low or too high is a sign of underlying medical problems. (buzzle.com)
  • A heart rate that lies consistantly above or below these numbers fall outside of the normal range but may not be abnormal. (medhelp.org)
  • body's
  • The heart rate can vary according to the body's physical needs, including the need to absorb oxygen and excrete carbon dioxide. (wikipedia.org)
  • disease
  • Abnormalities of heart rate sometimes indicate disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • This section discusses target heart rates for healthy persons and are inappropriately high for most persons with coronary artery disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • Overall, maintaining the heart rate to the recommended normal range is crucial for leading a healthy and disease-free life. (buzzle.com)
  • My cardiologist have said this as well - stress eventually will lead you to heart disease, its a given unless stress and anxiety are contained. (medhelp.org)
  • impulses
  • Besides these methods, a more accurate alternative is by means of an electrocardiograph that records the electrical impulses of the heart. (buzzle.com)
  • PVCs
  • Occasionally a PVC could trigger a rapid heartbeat in 140 -160 range but it usually would stop after a few minutes, some with PVCs occuring with the fast rate sometimes the rate would just be fast and regular with no PVCs. (medhelp.org)
  • Garmin
  • We are proud to support our men and women in uniform in both their training and even with high-end wrist top GPS navigation units like the Garmin fenix, which is very popular with military personnel', says Rusty Squire, President of the Heart Rate Watch Company. (prweb.com)
  • time
  • By holding the arrow buttons you can adjust the time increment between heart rate announcements. (chipchick.com)
  • The AquaPulse announces your heart rate in real time, and at a user definable interval. (chipchick.com)
  • Morning heart rate -- also known as a resting heart rate -- derives its name from the time of day it occurs. (livestrong.com)
  • Chronotropic effects (from chrono-, meaning time, and tropos, "a turn") are those that change the heart rate. (wikipedia.org)
  • With the aim of integrating various aspects of health into a single user timeline, Argus was designed to integrate data from Instant Heart Rate, Sleep Time, Fitness Buddy, and Instant Fitness into a single location. (wikipedia.org)
  • nerves
  • Chronotropic drugs may change the heart rate and rhythm by affecting the electrical conduction system of the heart and the nerves that influence it, such as by changing the rhythm produced by the sinoatrial node. (wikipedia.org)
  • blood pressure
  • High blood pressure medications are used to block these receptors and so reduce the heart rate. (wikipedia.org)
  • Respiration gives rise to waves in heart rate mediated primarily via the PSNS, and it is thought that the lag in the baroreceptor feedback loop may give rise to 10 second waves in heart rate (associated with Mayer waves of blood pressure), but this remains controversial. (wikipedia.org)
  • This heart rate variation is associated with Mayer waves (Traube-Hering-Mayer waves) of blood pressure and is usually at a frequency of 0.1 Hz or a 10-second period. (wikipedia.org)
  • Whether the single beat blood pressure increase after a compensatory pause occurs in both normal and compromised hearts as well is at present uncertain. (wikipedia.org)
  • For you, your heart rate lies in the normal range but your systolic blood pressure lies at the upper range of what we consider normal. (medhelp.org)
  • Withg conditioning, you will notice your heart rate will probably be lower, your blood pressure should lower, and some of that stress and turmoil might not seem so important. (medhelp.org)
  • adult
  • Several studies, as well as expert consensus, indicate that the normal resting adult human heart rate is probably a range between 50 and 90 bpm, though the American Heart Association states the normal resting adult human heart rate is 60-100 bpm. (wikipedia.org)
  • athletes
  • In comparison to this, the normal heart rate for well-trained athletes is low, usually between 40 to 60, depending upon the fitness level. (buzzle.com)
  • An example of this is the lower heart rate that some athletes keep due to conditioning. (medhelp.org)
  • Many runners, even elite athletes, have to resort to alternating between walking and running in order to keep their heart rates "in the zone. (runnersworld.com)
  • range
  • Normal resting heart rates range from 50-90 bpm. (wikipedia.org)
  • The normal range of heart rate for a fetus is 110 to 180 bpm. (buzzle.com)
  • Similar to men, the resting heart rate falling within the range of 60 to 90 bpm is considered to be normal for women. (buzzle.com)
  • This heart rate variation is associated with respiration and faithfully tracks the respiratory rate across a range of frequencies. (wikipedia.org)
  • This little calculator will help you figure out your training heart rate, given as a range. (calculatorcat.com)
  • There is an ideal heart rate range that you want to hit while you're exercising, this range is determined by age, and shifts depending on the reason you're exercising (fat burning versus high intensity interval training). (chipchick.com)
  • activity
  • The normal heart rate of an individual differs due to certain aspects, such as age, gender, activity level, and overall fitness. (buzzle.com)
  • Want to know your resting heart rate or find out how fast your heart is beating after a certain fitness activity? (apple.com)
  • Your physical fitness, age, prescribed medications, activity level and body position can cause your morning heart rate to vary. (livestrong.com)
  • increase
  • Whether if it's to burn fat, increase stamina, or sustain a specific heart rate, it is always better to be accurate. (heartratewatchcompany.com)
  • Due to individuals having a constant blood volume, one of the physiological ways to deliver more oxygen to an organ is to increase heart rate to permit blood to pass by the organ more often. (wikipedia.org)
  • Central nervous system stimulants such as substituted amphetamines increase heart rate. (wikipedia.org)
  • lower
  • Physically fit people tend to have lower resting heart rates than sedentary individuals. (livestrong.com)
  • Science suggests that those who could perform this task had lower rates of mortality from all causes than those who could not. (aarp.org)
  • minute
  • Heart rate is the speed of the heartbeat measured by the number of contractions of the heart per minute (bpm). (wikipedia.org)
  • With advancements in mobile phone camera resolution, most smart phones can accurately measure heart rate by analyzing minute color changes of the skin. (wikipedia.org)
  • track
  • The AquaPulse by Finis uses infrared technology to track your heart rate via your ear lobe, it is then verbally announced while you swim. (chipchick.com)
  • The application, illuminates a user's finger with a phone's flashlight feature and uses the phone's camera to analyze color changes in the finger tip to track heart rate. (wikipedia.org)