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  • Myocytes
  • Sarcoplasmic reticulum CaATPase (SERCA) is an energy-dependent ion pump found the sarcoplasmic reticulum of cardiac myocytes that is responsible for transporting Ca2+ within the cytosol back in to the lumen of the sarcoplasmic reticulum. (wikipedia.org)
  • Nitroxyl has also been shown to increase the sensitivity to cardiac myocytes to Ca2+, which in turn enhances the force of contraction. (wikipedia.org)
  • when myocytes fail to relax appropriately, myosin cross bridges remain intact and generate tension throughout diastole and thus increase stress on the heart. (wikipedia.org)
  • Classification of Blood Pressure in Adults Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) is a cardiac neurohormone secreted from ventricular myocytes (ventricular muscle cells) at the end of diastole-this in response to the normal, or sub-normal (as the case may be), stretching of cardiomyocytes (heart muscle cells) during systole. (wikipedia.org)
  • Impaired diastolic function can result from the decreased compliance of ventricular myocytes, and thus the ventricles, which means the heart muscle does not stretch as much as needed during filling. (wikipedia.org)
  • Stretching of the myofibrils in cardiac muscle causes them to contract more powerfully due to a greater number of cross-bridges being formed between the myofibrils within cardiac myocytes. (wikipedia.org)
  • symptoms
  • The investigators have shown that patients attending the Leeds Integrated Heart Failure Service are also frequently deficient in vitamin D and that the severity of the deficiency relates to the levels of symptoms, exercise capacity, diuretic requirements and response to optimal medical therapy. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • A randomised, placebo-controlled proof of concept study in 60 CHF patients has demonstrated improvements in submaximal exercise capacity and symptoms. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • The primary endpoint was a composite of heart failure hospitalization, all-cause death, the need for reassignment to the other arm, worsening NYHA class, or a worsening of symptoms as perceived by the patient. (medpagetoday.com)
  • The patients were starting out with either no or mild symptoms, she said, so a much longer follow-up period would be needed to observe functional effects. (medpagetoday.com)
  • Nevertheless, taking into consideration the goal of keeping patients with few heart failure symptoms from progressing, Dr. Linde said, "the benefits outweigh the risk. (medpagetoday.com)
  • Sudden cardiac death describes the unexpected natural death from a cardiac cause within a short time period, generally ≤1 hour from the onset of symptoms, in a person without any prior condition that would appear fatal. (ahajournals.org)
  • 2 hours from the onset of symptoms, 12% of all natural deaths were classified as sudden in one study, and 88% of those were due to cardiac disease. (ahajournals.org)
  • For patients with CHF, the self-management plan includes monitoring of symptoms such as fatigue and shortness of breath, daily weighing, and knowing what to do if signs of deterioration appear, and when to report the changes to health care provider. (knowcancer.com)
  • Other diseases that may have symptoms similar to heart failure include obesity, kidney failure, liver problems, anemia, and thyroid disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • Treatment of CHF aims to relieve symptoms, to maintain a euvolemic state (normal fluid level in the circulatory system), and to improve prognosis by delaying progression of heart failure and reducing cardiovascular risk. (wikipedia.org)
  • Play media Signs/symptoms of tricuspid insufficiency are generally those of right-sided heart failure, such as ascites and peripheral edema. (wikipedia.org)
  • This therapy is intended for the treatment of patients with moderate to severe heart failure (NYHA class II-IV) with symptoms despite optimal medical therapy who can benefit from an improvement in cardiac output. (wikipedia.org)
  • When a person visits the hospital or doctor with other symptoms, especially with a history of heart problems, they will normally be required to undergo an electrocardiogram, which monitors electrical activity within the heart and shows abnormalities when a cardiac aneurysm is present. (wikipedia.org)
  • prognosis
  • Although PPP could alter after several intervention for heart failure, the impact of PPP changes on prognosis had not fully been evaluated. (ovid.com)
  • Our data suggest that plasma IL-37 may play a role in the pathogenesis of CHF and may be a novel predictor of poor prognosis in HF patients. (hindawi.com)
  • In patients with CHF, the prognosis worsens considerably once malnutrition develops. (knowcancer.com)
  • It is also important to note that since tricuspid insufficiency most often arises from left heart failure or pulmonary hypertension, the person's prognosis is usually dictated by the prognosis of the latter conditions and not by the tricuspid insufficiency per se. (wikipedia.org)
  • Magnetic Resonance
  • The present study is designed to detect whether vitamin D has pathophysiologically important effects, as well as providing preliminary evidence of efficacy and safety by examining cardiac function (using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging) and submaximal exercise capacity (by 6-minute walk test). (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Cardiac magnetic resonance may also be used as a diagnostic tool, and finally, cardiac catheterization may determine the extent of the regurgitation. (wikipedia.org)
  • mortality
  • To determine whether an increased QRS duration predicts cardiac mortality in ICD recipients. (bmj.com)
  • Although significant progress has been made in the treatment of heart failure, patients continue to have a poor quality of life and an unacceptably high mortality. (bmj.com)
  • During the follow-up period of 664±535days, 168 (24%) patients had all-cause mortality, 75 patients (11%) had cardiovascular mortality, 219 (33%) patients were rehospitalized with HF. (ovid.com)
  • Kaplan-Meier curves and the log-rank test demonstrated the patients with decreased PPP had significantly higher incidence of all-cause mortality (p=0.03), cardiovascular mortality (p=0.007) and HF rehospitalization (P=0.002). (ovid.com)
  • A multivariate Cox regression analysis revealed decreased PPP was independently associated with higher risk of all-cause mortality (HR 1.78, 95% CI 1.10-2.76), cardiovascular mortality (HR 2.50, 95% CI 1.31-4.45) and HF rehospitalization (HR 1.63, 95% CI 1.06-2.43) after adjusting for other risk factors, including variables of American Heart Association Get With the Guidelines-Heart Failure (GWTG-HF) risk score. (ovid.com)
  • For these reasons, total mortality, rather than classifications of cardiac and arrhythmic mortality, should be used as primary objectives for many outcome studies. (ahajournals.org)
  • 1 Sudden cardiac death is the most common and often the first manifestation of coronary heart disease and is responsible for ≈50% of the mortality from cardiovascular disease in the United States and other developed countries. (ahajournals.org)
  • Mortality at 18 months in unselected patients with CHF in whom cardiac cachexia had been diagnosed was as high as 50% compared to in non-cachectic patients from the same study population. (knowcancer.com)
  • Some drugs which increase heart function, such as the positive inotrope milrinone, lead to increased mortality, and are contraindicated. (wikipedia.org)
  • valvular heart d
  • a.k.a. floppy mitral valve syndrome, systolic click murmur syndrome or billowing mitral leaflet) is a valvular heart disease characterized by the displacement of an abnormally thickened mitral valve leaflet into the left atrium during systole. (wikipedia.org)
  • Tricuspid insufficiency (TI), a valvular heart disease also called tricuspid regurgitation (TR), refers to the failure of the heart's tricuspid valve to close properly during systole. (wikipedia.org)
  • implantable
  • Patients resuscitated from ventricular tachyarrhythmias benefit from implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) as opposed to medical treatment. (bmj.com)
  • Three recent randomised clinical trials have provided evidence of increased survival in patients with resuscitated VT or ventricular fibrillation (VF) who received an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) compared with those who were treated with amiodarone. (bmj.com)
  • 1 2 Such a rapid death is often attributed to a cardiac arrhythmia, but with the advent of monitoring capabilities from implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs), it is now well recognized that classifications based on clinical circumstances can be misleading and often impossible, because 40% of sudden deaths can be unwitnessed. (ahajournals.org)
  • Sometimes, depending on the cause, an implanted device such as a pacemaker or an implantable cardiac defibrillator may be recommended. (wikipedia.org)
  • Permanent pacing with an implantable pacemaker involves transvenous placement of one or more pacing electrodes within a chamber, or chambers, of the heart, while the pacemaker is implanted inside the skin under the clavicle. (wikipedia.org)
  • clinical
  • VINDICATE will be a randomised, placebo-controlled developmental clinical study in 250 patients with CHF and vitamin D deficiency. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • The clinical events which predict the highest subsequent risk are also the most serious presenting events-namely, symptomatic ventricular tachyarrhythmias (including cardiac arrest) and syncope. (bmj.com)
  • Clinical outcomes were compared between patients with and without decreased PPP. (ovid.com)
  • Aaronson KD, Schwartz JS, Chen TM et al (1997) Development and prospective validation of a clinical index to predict survival in ambulatory patients referred for cardiac transplant evaluation. (springer.com)
  • In clinical cardiology the term "diastolic function" is most commonly referred as how the heart fills. (wikipedia.org)
  • He then took an NHS consultant position in Birmingham where he became the clinical service lead for cardiothoracic surgery and Associate Medical Director for Clinical Governance at University Hospital Birmingham before being appointed Professor of cardiac surgery at University College London and Director of Surgery at The Heart Hospital in 2004. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1994 he established the National Adult Cardiac Surgical Database and as a consequence, he is perhaps best known for his work promoting the measurement, analysis and public disclosure of clinical outcomes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Prior to becoming Medical Director of the National Health Service he served on the National Coronary Heart Disease Taskforce, the NHS Standing Medical Advisory Committee, and was chairman of the NHS Information Taskforce on Clinical Outcomes for the Department of Health. (wikipedia.org)
  • myocardium
  • Rather, CCM signals are intended to enhance systolic function of the failing myocardium ( 5-8 ). (onlinejacc.org)
  • Ischemia Ischemia, or inadequate oxygenation of the myocardium, is observed in a high proportion of HFpEF patients. (wikipedia.org)
  • Initially, this helps compensate for heart failure by maintaining blood pressure and perfusion, but places further strain on the myocardium, increasing coronary perfusion requirements, which can lead to worsening of ischemic heart disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • Binding to beta-1 receptors in the myocardium increases the heart rate and makes contractions more forceful in an attempt to increase cardiac output. (wikipedia.org)
  • The chronically high levels of circulating neuroendocrine hormones such as catecholamines, renin, angiotensin, and aldosterone affect the myocardium directly, causing structural remodelling of the heart over the long term. (wikipedia.org)
  • ischemic
  • Cardiovascular autonomic function, which can be assessed, for example, by measuring postexercise heart rate recovery (HRR), and by analyzing heart rate (HR) variability and HR turbulence (HRT) from ambulatory electrocardiogram (ECG) recordings, has been shown to be altered among patients with ischemic heart disease ( 1 - 3 ). (diabetesjournals.org)
  • In less-developed countries, sudden cardiac death rates parallel the rates of ischemic heart disease as a whole and therefore are lower. (ahajournals.org)
  • Decreased expression of CARP in cardiac cells within the ischemic region was detected in a rat model of ischemic injury, and was thought to be linked to the induction of GADD153, an apoptosis-related gene. (wikipedia.org)
  • Patients with aortic stenosis, obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and ischemic cardiomyopathies should not use Waon therapy as a treatment. (wikipedia.org)
  • Prohibiting patients with ischemic cardiomyopathies prevents an increase in temperature from further activating the sympathetic nervous system, which could cause tachycardia in these patients. (wikipedia.org)
  • aneurysm
  • PURPOSE: The objective of this trial was to investigate the capacity of gated perfusion SPECT (GPS) to detect left ventricular aneurysm (ANV) by comparing QGS and 4D-MSPECT (4DM) algorithms with radionuclide ventriculography (RVG). (biomedsearch.com)
  • A left ventricular aneurysm can be associated with ST elevation. (wikipedia.org)
  • In other cases, a similarly developed pseudoaneurysm ("false aneurysm") may burst, sometimes resulting in the death of the patient. (wikipedia.org)
  • When the heart muscle (cardiac muscle) partially dies during a heart attack, a layer of muscle may survive, and, being severely weakened, start to become an aneurysm. (wikipedia.org)
  • Also ACE Inhibitors seem to prevent Left Ventricular remodeling and aneurysm formation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Blood thinning agents may be given to help reduce the likelihood of blood thickening and clots forming, along with the use of drugs to correct the irregular rhythm of the heart (seen on the electrocardiogram) Coronary artery aneurysm "What is an Aneurysm? (wikipedia.org)
  • Distinguishing left ventricular aneurysm from pseudoaneurysm. (wikipedia.org)
  • Steiner, R.E. "Ventricular aneurysm. (wikipedia.org)
  • arrhythmia
  • 3 Only an ECG or a ventricular electrogram recorded from an implanted device at the time of death can provide definitive information about an arrhythmia. (ahajournals.org)
  • severe
  • All patients, including 2 infants on mechanical ventilation, had severe tricuspid regurgitation and were in NYHA class IV. (ahajournals.org)
  • A ventricular assist device or occasionally a heart transplant may be recommended in those with severe disease despite all other measures. (wikipedia.org)
  • Several classes are used, with combinations reserved for severe heart failure: Loop diuretics (e.g. furosemide, bumetanide) - most commonly used class in CHF, usually for moderate CHF Thiazide diuretics (e.g. hydrochlorothiazide, chlorthalidone, chlorthiazide) - may be useful for mild CHF, but typically used in severe CHF in combination with loop diuretics, resulting in a synergistic effect. (wikipedia.org)
  • Heart complications may be long-term and severe, particularly if valves are involved. (wikipedia.org)
  • tricuspid valve
  • Dilation leads to derangement of the normal anatomy and mechanics of the tricuspid valve and the muscles governing its proper function, with the result being incompetence of the tricuspid valve. (wikipedia.org)
  • 0.01
  • Among patients implanted with cardiac resynchronization devices, those with activated devices were significantly less likely to meet a composite endpoint that indicates worsening heart failure after two years (19% versus 34%, P =0.01), according to Jean-Claude Daubert, M.D., of Centre Hospitalier Universitaire in Rennes, France. (medpagetoday.com)
  • Although patients in both groups declined over time, the decline was attenuated in those with an active device ( P =0.01). (medpagetoday.com)
  • 0.01) were normalized after the operation in all 8 patients. (ahajournals.org)
  • sudden death
  • 30% at 1-3 years, while the actual risk of subsequent sudden death for patients presenting with syncope is 45% at one year. (bmj.com)
  • abnormalities
  • Grines C, Bashore T, Boudoulas H et al (1989) Functional abnormalities in isolated left bundle branch block: the effect of interventricular asynchrony. (springer.com)
  • Other cardiorenal connectors include renin-angiotensin-system activation, nitric oxide/reactive oxygen species imbalance, inflammatory factors and abnormal activation of the sympathetic nervous system, which can cause structural and functional abnormalities in both heart and/or the kidney. (wikipedia.org)
  • significantly
  • Results Within 3 months after CRT, the number of HF patients with documented AT decreased significantly from the immediate pre-CRT value and tended to decline with time. (onlinejacc.org)
  • It becomes obvious that, to significantly reduce the incidence of sudden cardiac death, more specific markers are needed for the general population to identify large numbers in subgroups that account for a bigger percentage of the more than 300 000 who die suddenly. (ahajournals.org)
  • heart's
  • A pacemaker (or artificial pacemaker, so as not to be confused with the heart's natural pacemaker) is a medical device which uses electrical impulses, delivered by electrodes contracting the heart muscles, to regulate the beating of the heart. (wikipedia.org)
  • The primary purpose of a pacemaker is to maintain an adequate heart rate, either because the heart's natural pacemaker is not fast enough, or because there is a block in the heart's electrical conduction system. (wikipedia.org)
  • incidence
  • Several population-based studies have documented a 15% to 19% decline in the incidence of sudden cardiac deaths caused by coronary heart disease since the early 1980s. (ahajournals.org)
  • Figure 1 ⇓ places the problem into perspective by expressing the incidence of sudden cardiac death in different subgroups at varying risk while indicating the overall number of events per year for each. (ahajournals.org)
  • After an initial high attrition rate for the high-risk group in the first 6 to 18 months, the curves then become parallel, illustrating the modulating effects of time on the incidence of sudden cardiac death. (ahajournals.org)
  • The incidence of new cases has been calculated at 2 000 000 new patients per year (470 000 in Europe and 480 000 in the United States). (springer.com)
  • tissue
  • Using tissue Doppler imaging, the peak systolic velocity (Sm) and peak early diastolic velocity (Em) were calculated for LV function, while the standard deviation of the time to peak systolic velocity (Ts-SD) and the time to peak early diastolic velocity (Te-SD) were calculated for mechanical dyssynchrony. (onlinejacc.org)
  • Secondly, the nitroxyl group from CXL 1020 interacts with ryanodine receptors (RyR), specifically RyR2, which is the predominant form found in cardiac tissue. (wikipedia.org)
  • Endothelial cells also are responsible for the production of E-selectin, which recruits lymphocytes into the tissue beneath the endothelium that subsequently release transforming growth factor beta, encouraging fibrosis and thus ventricular stiffening. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ischemia may manifest in distinct ways, either as a result of increasing tissue oxygen demand, or diminished ability of the heart to supply oxygen to the tissue. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the heart, they usually arise from a patch of weakened tissue in a ventricular wall, which swells into a bubble filled with blood. (wikipedia.org)
  • electrogram
  • The filtered esophageal left heart electrogram is a semi-invasive electrocardiographic method. (wikipedia.org)
  • To eliminate artifacts in the esophageal left atrial electrogram and to improve the differentiation of the left atrial deflection from the ventricular complex, filtering with a Butterworth highpass is recommended. (wikipedia.org)
  • The esophageal electrogram recording feature of the ICS3000 offers a filtered Butterworth high-pass esophageal left atrial electrogram. (wikipedia.org)
  • In combination with the surface ECG, filtered bipolar esophageal left atrial electrogram (LAE) recording can be of advantage in all situations requiring doubtless recognition of the atrial activities. (wikipedia.org)
  • Esophageal left atrial electrogram recording to detect supra-ventricular tachycardias using the ICS3000 programmer (BIOTRONIK GmbH, Berlin, Germany). (wikipedia.org)
  • With the preset AV delay, the interval between the left atrial deflection (LA) in the filtered esophageal left atrial electrogram (LAE) and the ventricular stimulus (Vp) is measured. (wikipedia.org)
  • efficacy
  • Purpose: This study will measure patient responses and compare the efficacy of a double drug combination (gemcitabine and trastuzumab) with a triple drug combination (gemcitabine, trastuzumab, and cisplatin) in patients with metastatic breast cancer. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • diastole
  • and 0.5 sec in diastole (dilation), re-filling the four chambers of the heart, for a total time of 0.8 sec to complete the entire cycle. (wikipedia.org)
  • Then, in late ventricular diastole, the two atrial chambers contract (atrial systole), causing blood pressure in both atria to increase and forcing additional blood flow into the ventricles. (wikipedia.org)
  • Elevated levels of BNP indicate excessive natriuresis (excretion of sodium to the urine) and decline of ventricular function, especially during diastole. (wikipedia.org)
  • A reduced stroke volume may occur as a result of a failure of systole, diastole or both. (wikipedia.org)
  • tachyarrhythmia
  • These factors have an impact on the effects of therapeutic interventions because, although it is relatively easy to identify patients in the small high-risk subgroups and then to possibly prevent or reverse a ventricular tachyarrhythmia, the overall impact on the total number of sudden cardiac deaths will be small. (ahajournals.org)
  • chamber
  • CARP was originally identified as a YB-1-associating, cardiac-restricted transcription co-repressor in the homeobox NKX2-5 pathway that is involved in cardiac ventricular chamber specification, maturation and morphogenesis, and whose mRNA levels are exquisitely sensitive to Doxorubicin, mediated through a hydrogen peroxide/ERK/p38MAP kinase-dependent as well as M-CAT cis-element-dependent mechanism. (wikipedia.org)
  • The procedure is performed by incision of a suitable vein into which the electrode lead is inserted and passed along the vein, through the valve of the heart, until positioned in the chamber. (wikipedia.org)
  • increases
  • Unfortunately, administration of heparin to patients with ACS increases circulating PAPP-A, probably by a detachment of PAPP-A from cell surfaces, inducing a considerable bias when using PAPP-A as a biomarker. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Compared with vehicle-treated Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY-V), the vehicle-treated SHRs (SHR-V) exhibited significant increases in left ventricular mass, perivascular collagen, cardiomyocyte size, and macrophage infiltration. (springer.com)
  • This helps restore blood pressure but also increases the total peripheral resistance, increasing the workload of the heart. (wikipedia.org)
  • This also, however, increases the amount of work the heart has to perform. (wikipedia.org)
  • Heart failure also limits the kidneys' ability to dispose of sodium and water, which further increases edema. (wikipedia.org)
  • obesity
  • Hypertension, obesity, metabolic syndrome, and sedentary lifestyle have been identified as important risk factors for diverse types of heart disease including HFpEF. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is thought that increased pressure, in concert with a pro-inflammatory state (insulin resistance, obesity), encourage ventricular stiffening and remodeling that lead to poor cardiac output seen in HFpEF. (wikipedia.org)
  • perfusion
  • The heart and the kidneys are involved in maintaining hemodynamic stability and organ perfusion through an intricate network. (wikipedia.org)
  • CD34 positive cells promote angiogenesis to increase blood flow, improving cardiac perfusion and decreasing vascular resistance. (wikipedia.org)
  • cardiovascular
  • 11 patients died of cardiovascular cause, and 27 HF patients were rehospitalized for worsening HF within 12 months. (hindawi.com)
  • Figure 1B ⇓ shows idealized curves of survival from sudden cardiac death for a population free of major cardiovascular events versus a population that has survived a major cardiovascular event. (ahajournals.org)
  • Therefore, regardless of which organ fails first, the same neurohormonal systems are activated causing accelerated cardiovascular disease, and progression of damage and failure of both organs. (wikipedia.org)
  • cardiopulmonary bypass
  • In June 2008, the Impella 2.5 heart pump received FDA 510(k) clearance for partial circulatory support for periods of up to 6 hours during cardiac procedures not requiring cardiopulmonary bypass. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is also distinct from a cardiopulmonary bypass machine, which is an external device used to provide the functions of both the heart and lungs and are used only for a few hours at a time, most commonly during cardiac surgery. (wikipedia.org)
  • This surgery is usually performed with the heart stopped, necessitating the usage of cardiopulmonary bypass. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, two alternative techniques are also available, allowing CABG to be performed on a beating heart either without using the cardiopulmonary bypass, a procedure referred to as "off-pump" surgery, or performing beating surgery using partial assistance of the cardiopulmonary bypass, a procedure referred to as "on-pump beating" surgery. (wikipedia.org)
  • With the exception of cardiopulmonary bypass, current therapeutic approaches do not allow the heart to rest and recover. (wikipedia.org)
  • myocyte
  • Therefore, stimulation of SERCA leads to accelerated uptake of Ca2+ from the cytosol of the cardiac myocyte. (wikipedia.org)
  • Histologically, Mybpc3-targeted knock-out hearts display structural rearrangements with cardiac myocyte disarray and increased interstitial fibrosis similar to patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, without obvious alterations in shape or size of single cardiac myocytes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Pacing
  • Early pacemakers generally included a single atrial lead and/or a single ventricular lead, thus limiting both sensing and pacing functions. (google.com)
  • Thus, pacing and sensing can be targeted to more specific areas within the heart. (google.com)
  • A PVC can generally be identified by a pacing system as a ventricular sensed event that follows another ventricular event without an intervening atrial event. (google.com)
  • Current devices can be programmed to detect abnormal heart rhythms and deliver therapy via programmable antitachycardia pacing in addition to low-energy and high-energy shocks. (wikipedia.org)
  • atrial
  • One type of PVC response is the initiation of an extended post-ventricular atrial refractory period (PVARP) of 400 ms. An extended PVARP is a predetermined time window, during which atrial events are ignored or "blanked" out. (google.com)
  • The risk of systemic embolization (atrial clots migrating to other organs) depends strongly on whether there is an underlying structural problem with the heart (e.g. mitral stenosis) and on the presence of other risk factors, such as diabetes and high blood pressure. (wikipedia.org)
  • Device
  • The experimental and in vitro testing of this novel device took place in 1970, and in March 1971, Ionescu began, for the first time, the implantation of the pericardial valve in all three cardiac positions in humans.Between 1971 and 1976 the valves had been made in Ionescu's own hospital laboratory. (wikipedia.org)
  • The lead (the electrical cable connecting the device to the heart) has a much longer average longevity but can incur various types of malfunction, specifically insulation failure or fracture of the conductor and require replacement. (wikipedia.org)
  • Impella is a family of medical devices used for temporary ventricular support device in people with depressed heart function. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some versions of the device can provide right heart support during other forms of mechanical circulatory support including ECMO and Centrimag. (wikipedia.org)
  • In January 2015, the Impella RP was granted a humanitarian device exemption (HDE) to provide circulatory assistance for people who develop right heart failure. (wikipedia.org)
  • An artificial heart valve is a device implanted in the heart of a patient with valvular heart disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • An artificial heart is a device that replaces the heart. (wikipedia.org)
  • An artificial heart is distinct from a ventricular assist device (VAD) designed to support a failing heart. (wikipedia.org)
  • Paul Winchell invented an artificial heart with the assistance of Henry Heimlich (the inventor of the Heimlich Maneuver) and held the first patent for such a device. (wikipedia.org)
  • mechanical
  • The cardiac extracellular matrix (ECM) not only provides mechanical support, but also transduces essential molecular signals in health and disease. (jci.org)
  • There are three main types of artificial heart valves: the mechanical,the biological, and the tissue engineered valves. (wikipedia.org)
  • A mechanical heart valve is intended to replace a diseased heart valve with its prosthetic equivalent. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] However, current mechanical heart valves all require lifelong treatment with anticoagulants (blood thinners), e.g. warfarin, which requires monthly blood tests to monitor. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Dodrill-GMR heart machine, considered to be the first operational mechanical heart, was successfully used while performing heart surgery. (wikipedia.org)
  • This is primarily achieved by using temporary minimally invasive mechanical circulatory support to supplant the pumping of blood by the heart. (wikipedia.org)
  • Under conditions of mechanical support, mean aortic pressure (MAP) is maintained independent of native ventricular function, and ventricular and aortic pressures become uncoupled. (wikipedia.org)
  • pacemakers
  • Certain variations of these pacemakers sense and/or pace within two, three or four chambers of the heart. (google.com)
  • The second part of the system is an electrode wire or wires that, similar to pacemakers, are connected to the generator and passed through a vein to the right chambers of the heart. (wikipedia.org)
  • sudden
  • Although the causes of death were varied, most of the deaths appeared to be either cardiovascular (e.g., heart failure, sudden death) or infectious (e.g., pneumonia) in nature. (nih.gov)
  • It is the most common cause of sudden cardiac death in young people. (phacdochuabenh.com)
  • There were no cases of valve thrombosis, intra-vascular haemolysis or sudden, unexpected valve failure. (wikipedia.org)
  • Implantation of ICD is meant to prevent sudden cardiac death and is indicated under various conditions. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mortality
  • The extent to which the findings of increased mortality in observational studies may be attributed to the antipsychotic drug as opposed to some characteristic(s) of the patients is not clear. (nih.gov)
  • All-Cause Mortality or Heart Failure-related Hospitalization [ Time Frame: Participants were followed for the duration of the study, an average of 39.8 months post-randomization. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Excess mortality has been seen in patients with symptomatic heart failure in the MOXCON study. (wikipedia.org)
  • The SCD-HeFT trial (published in 2005) showed a significant all-cause mortality benefit for patients with ICD. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hypertrophic
  • The cloning of the human MYBPC3 cDNA and localization of the gene on human chromosome 11p11.2 has assisted the structure and function of cMyBP-C. MYBPC3 became therefore the "best" candidate gene for the CMH4 locus for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy that was initially mapped by the group of Schwartz. (wikipedia.org)
  • MYBPC3 was thus the fourth gene for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, following MYH7, encoding β-myosin heavy chain, TNNT2 and TPM1, encoding cardiac troponin T and α-tropomyosin, respectively, earmarking hypertrophic cardiomyopathy as a disease of the sarcomere. (wikipedia.org)
  • secondary
  • Pericardial effusions often occur secondary to pericarditis, kidney failure, or tumours and frequently do not cause any symptoms. (wikipedia.org)
  • obstruction
  • Left main coronary artery obstruction requires two bypasses, one to the LAD and one to the LCX. (wikipedia.org)
  • A single obstruction of the left main coronary artery is associated with a higher risk for a cardiac death and usually receives a double bypass. (wikipedia.org)
  • reduces
  • Synergy of isoflurane preconditioning and propofol postconditioning reduces myocardial reperfusion injury in patients," Clinical Science , vol. 121, no. 2, pp. 57-69, 2011. (hindawi.com)
  • Therefore, the decrease in the concentration gradient of sodium into the cell which occurs when the Na/K-ATPase is inhibited reduces the ability of the NCX to function. (wikipedia.org)
  • dilation
  • A number of features involving the heart have been noted in several LFS cases, the most significant being dilation of the aortic root, a section of the ascending aorta. (wikipedia.org)
  • troponin
  • β-tropomyosin functions in association with α-tropomyosin and the troponin complex-composed of troponin I, troponin C and troponin T-to modulated the actin and myosin interaction. (wikipedia.org)
  • myosin
  • Mouse transgenic studies in which the phosphorylation site in α-tropomyosin is mutated to Alanine have shown that phosphorylation may function to modulate tropomyosin polymerization, head-to-tail interactions between adjacent tropomyosin molecules, cooperativity, myosin ATPase activity, and the cardiac response to stress. (wikipedia.org)
  • The myosin-binding protein C, cardiac-type is a protein that in humans is encoded by the MYBPC3 gene. (wikipedia.org)
  • Congenital
  • Heterozygous mutations in TPM2 have been identified in patients with congenital cap myopathy, a rare disorder defined by cap-like structures in muscle fiber periphery. (wikipedia.org)
  • As a result of a number of disease processes, both acquired and congenital, any one of the four heart valves may malfunction and result in either stenosis (impeded forward flow) and/or backward flow (regurgitation). (wikipedia.org)
  • Hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) is a rare congenital heart defect in which the left side of the heart is severely underdeveloped. (wikipedia.org)
  • isoform
  • Specific functional insights into the function of the β-tropomyosin isoform have come from studies employing transgenesis. (wikipedia.org)
  • This isoform is expressed exclusively in heart muscle during human and mouse development, and is distinct from those expressed in slow skeletal muscle (MYBPC1) and fast skeletal muscle (MYBPC2). (wikipedia.org)
  • The cMyBP-C isoform expressed in cardiac muscle differs from those expressed in slow and fast skeletal muscle (MYBPC1 and MYBPC2, respectively) by three features: (1) an additional immunoglobulin (Ig)-like domain on the N-terminus, (2) a linker region between the second and third Ig domains, and (3) an additional loop in the sixth Ig domain. (wikipedia.org)
  • Congestive
  • The new CHA2DS2-VASc score (Congestive heart failure, Hypertension, Age ≥75 years (doubled), Diabetes mellitus, Stroke (doubled), Vascular disease, Age 65-74 years, Sex category] has also been validated in other large independent cohorts. (wikipedia.org)