• social
  • As opposed to cultural inequality, which focuses on the individual decisions associated with these imbalances, structural inequality refers specifically to the inequalities that are systemically rooted in the normal operations of dominant social institutions, and can be divided into categories like residential segregation or healthcare, employment and educational discrimination. (wikipedia.org)
  • State
  • Massachusetts has recognized these disparities, and became the first state to mandate collection of race and ethnicity data on all patients with an inpatient hospitalization, an observation unit stay, or an emergency department visit. (wikipedia.org)
  • Center
  • The HCHDS has been designated as a national Comprehensive Center of Excellence in Health Disparities by the NCMHD of the National Institutes of Health, and in 2007 was awarded a second 5-year grant to continue its work. (wikipedia.org)
  • As part of the vision, Adventist HealthCare created the Center on Health Disparities In October 2014, as part of a branding initiative to emphasize the Adventist HealthCare system name, the hospital's named changed from Washington Adventist Hospital to Adventist HealthCare Washington Adventist Hospital. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Center on Health Disparities also works to train interpreters as Qualified Bilingual staff that are available to assist patients and their families who may not speak English, during a medical encounter. (wikipedia.org)
  • areas
  • Genetic predisposition to many diseases as well as significant lack of government funding, lack of medical resources, and isolation from more populated areas with more medical resources, contribute to healthcare difficulties on reservations. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ethnic minorities are also increasing in number throughout rural areas, further adding to the size of healthcare disparities. (wikipedia.org)
  • level
  • The law had three key components aimed at combating healthcare inequality - mandating that every citizen has a minimum level of insurance coverage, providing free health care insurance for residents earning less than 150% of the federal poverty level and mandating employers with more than 10 "full-time" employees to provide healthcare insurance. (wikipedia.org)
  • Patients
  • Patients must trust that individual healthcare providers are competent and will have their best interest in mind while making treatment decisions. (wikipedia.org)
  • medical
  • And, they must trust that the healthcare organization and that its staff will manage their medical information with discretion and confidentially. (wikipedia.org)
  • increase
  • nurses later received their training at the college, a program that will expand with the School of Health Professions, Science and Wellness, a partnership with Washington Adventist Hospital and Adventist HealthCare, to increase the number of health care professionals in Maryland. (wikipedia.org)
  • individuals
  • These regions often consist of a larger percentage of medically underserved individuals, in conjunction with fewer physicians, nurses, and other healthcare workers. (wikipedia.org)
  • system
  • The founding of Washington Adventist Hospital by the Seventh-day Adventist Church in 1907 was the beginning of the Adventist HealthCare system. (wikipedia.org)
  • important
  • Trust is the foundation of the interrelationships that make civil society possible and the important of trust within healthcare is no less critical. (wikipedia.org)