• nosocomial
  • Major consideration is given to bacterial nosocomial infections because they are the most frequent type of infections spread in the healthcare delivery setting and the practical aspects of diagnosis and therapy are more meaningful based on a combination of medical and financial considerations. (gii.co.jp)
  • patients
  • Hospice enrollment and evaluation of its causal effect on hospitalization of dying nursing home patients. (ahrq.gov)
  • However, all through the world occasional non-deliberate accidental harm occurs to patients looking for care. (ukessays.com)
  • In Krehbiel Auditorium, Karina Ortman will present "Maple Syrup Urine Disease: A Study of Carrier Frequency in Mennonite and Non-Mennonite Populations" (a URICA Summer Research Grant and Mennonite Contributions Contest Award-winning presentation) and Luis Matute will speak on "Verbal Communication with Adult Unconscious Patients. (bethelks.edu)
  • Recognizing that healthcare errors impact 1 in every 10 patients around the world, the World Health Organization calls patient safety an endemic concern. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Department of Health Expert Group in June 2000 estimated that over 850,000 incidents harm National Health Service hospital patients in the United Kingdom each year. (wikipedia.org)
  • How well do discharge diagnoses identify hospitalised patients with community-acquired infections? (jove.com)
  • The aim of the study was to determine how well ICD-10 discharge diagnoses identify patients with community-acquired infections in a medical emergency department (ED), overall and related to sites of infection and patient characteristics. (jove.com)
  • Pneumonia, the inflammatory state of lung tissue primarily due to microbial infection, claimed 52,306 lives in the United States in 2007 1 and resulted in the hospitalization of 1.1 million patients 2 . (jove.com)
  • Figure 1) Osteopathic Manipulative Treatment (OMT) is a cost-effective adjunctive treatment of pneumonia that has been shown to reduce patients' length of hospital stay, duration of intravenous antibiotics, and incidence of respiratory failure or death when compared to subjects who received conventional care alone 5 . (jove.com)
  • The use of manual manipulation techniques for pneumonia was first recorded as early as the Spanish influenza pandemic of 1918, when patients treated with standard medical care had an estimated mortality rate of 33%, compared to a 10% mortality rate in patients treated by osteopathic physicians 6 . (jove.com)
  • Health care organizations have to be able to modify their activities based on sudden changes in the condition of their patients or sudden demands due to public health disasters such as pandemics (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome, 2002-2003), without compromising patient safety or quality of care. (mdpi.com)
  • RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS -Eighty-five patients who fit diabetic foot risk category 2 or 3 (neuropathy and foot deformity or previous history of ulceration or partial foot amputation) were randomized into a standard therapy group ( n = 41) or an enhanced therapy group ( n = 44). (diabetesjournals.org)
  • Identifying areas of injury by the presence of inflammation would then allow patients or health care providers to take action to decrease the inflammation before a wound develops. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • Telemedicine is just one of the technologies that can assist in health management to patients in rural areas. (ucdavis.edu)
  • Since hemodialysis requires access to the circulatory system, patients undergoing hemodialysis may expose their circulatory system to microbes, which can lead to bacteremia, an infection affecting the heart valves (endocarditis) or an infection affecting the bones (osteomyelitis). (wikipedia.org)
  • Patients with diabetes have also been shown to be at an elevated risk for acquiring CRE infections. (wikipedia.org)
  • When compared to other hospitalized patients, those admitted from long-term acute care (LTAC) facilities have significantly higher incidence of colonization and infection rates. (wikipedia.org)
  • A retrospective study of patients with CRKp and CSKp infection asserted that the use of cephalosporins (a class of β-lactam antibiotics) used before invasive procedures was higher in patients with CRKp infection, suggesting that it is a risk factor. (wikipedia.org)
  • One case study showed that patients with a compromised immune response are especially susceptible to both CRE exposure and infection. (wikipedia.org)
  • Studies exist about the psychological effects of lighting, carpeting and noise on critical-care patients, and evidence links physical environment with improvement of patients and staff safety, wellness and satisfaction. (wikipedia.org)
  • There is a growing awareness among healthcare professionals and medical planners for the need to create patient-centered environments that can help patients and family cope with the stress that accompanies illness. (wikipedia.org)
  • exposing patients to nature has been shown to produce substantial alleviation of pain, and limited research also suggests that patients experience less pain when exposed to higher levels of daylight in their hospital rooms. (wikipedia.org)
  • Computerized physician order entry (CPOE), sometimes referred to as computerized provider order entry or computerized provider order management (CPOM), is a process of electronic entry of medical practitioner instructions for the treatment of patients (particularly hospitalized patients) under his or her care. (wikipedia.org)
  • incidence
  • Most governments recognize the importance of public health programs in reducing the incidence of disease, disability, and the effects of aging and other physical and mental health conditions, although public health generally receives significantly less government funding compared with medicine. (wikipedia.org)
  • Centre
  • Professor Charles Spillane, Head of the Plant & AgriBiosciences Research Centre (PABC) at NUI Galway highlighted that: "The Yield Lab's establishment of its first European base in Galway is extremely exciting for the translation of agri-research activities into agri-innovations and startup agri-technology companies. (nuigalway.ie)
  • determinants of hea
  • Healthy People 2020 gives more prominence to health promotion and preventive approaches and adds a substantive focus on the importance of addressing social determinants of health. (wikipedia.org)
  • these are referred to as "determinants of health. (wikipedia.org)
  • Other social sciences such as sociology, development studies, psychology, anthropology, cultural studies, and law can help understand the determinants of health in societies. (wikipedia.org)
  • organization
  • Published surveys on patient safety show that in industrialized advanced countries, more than half of these adverse events are preventable and occur because of a shortage in system or organization design or operation rather than because of poor performance of healthcare providing staff (WHO report, 2006). (ukessays.com)
  • The objective of this paper is to review, in brief, the problem of patient safety with particular attention to patient safety in the ICU being one of the essential patient care systems in a health care organization. (ukessays.com)
  • inter-professional team learning and system based organizational learning, which encompass modified context specific learning by multiple teams and team members in a health care organization. (mdpi.com)
  • There were also major advances in the organization of care and in record keeping. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Center for Heath Design (CHD), a non-profit organization that supports healthcare and design professionals to improve the understanding and application of design that influence the performance of healthcare, patient satisfaction, staff productivity and safety, base their model on the importance of working in partnership with the client and interdisciplinary team to foster understanding of the client, preferences and resources. (wikipedia.org)
  • Schensul helped to create the research and training infrastructure at the Hispanic Health Council in Hartford, Connecticut, an organization she served as associate director for from 1978-1987. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dean
  • Keynote speaker, Rob Lemanske, Jr., professor of Pediatrics and Medicine and associate dean for Clinical & Translational Research at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, will present "Causes, Natural History & Possibilities for Prevention of Asthma. (nationwidechildrens.org)
  • These grants are an example of recombinant innovation, bringing together established faculty and programs in new ways to generate solutions to many of society's most difficult challenges," said Fred Meyers, executive associate dean at UC Davis School of Medicine. (ucdavis.edu)
  • and Heather Young, founding dean of the Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing. (ucdavis.edu)
  • conventional
  • Proponents point to mainstream sources that have published research supporting the benefits of nutrient supplementation and to instances where conventional medicine uses vitamins as treatments for some diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • infectious
  • Under the current Infectious Disease Society of America/American Thoracic Society guidelines, standard-of-care recommendations include the rapid administration of an appropriate antibiotic regiment, fluid replacement, and ventilation (if necessary). (jove.com)
  • Improving sanitation, access to clean drinking water, immunization against infectious diseases, and other public health measures can help reduce high rates of infant mortality. (wikipedia.org)
  • In Canada, the Public Health Agency of Canada is the national agency responsible for public health, emergency preparedness and response, and infectious and chronic disease control and prevention. (wikipedia.org)
  • School of Nurs
  • The Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing at UC Davis welcomes three international visiting professors who will teach, contribute content to courses and serve as a resource for students and faculty beginning this fall. (ucdavis.edu)
  • Courtenay will contribute content to three Nursing Science and Health-Care Leadership courses, provide guest lectures, serve as a mentor to graduate students and collaborate with School of Nursing faculty on research projects. (ucdavis.edu)
  • I am delighted to join the School of Nursing and to have this opportunity to contribute to the school's mission to transform health care through nursing research, education and leadership," Courtenay said. (ucdavis.edu)
  • The School of Nursing also welcomed Leehu Zysberg as a visiting associate professor beginning Sept. 1. (ucdavis.edu)
  • Anna Zisberg also joined the School of Nursing team Sept. 1 as a visiting associate professor. (ucdavis.edu)
  • Zisberg received her doctorate from the University of Washington School of Nursing. (ucdavis.edu)
  • Zisberg will contribute to the School of Nursing core courses and she will serve as a guest lecturer and a resource for faculty and students. (ucdavis.edu)
  • The Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing at UC Davis was established in March 2009 through a $100 million commitment from the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, the nation's largest grant for nursing education. (ucdavis.edu)
  • The vision of the Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing is to transform health care through nursing education and research. (ucdavis.edu)
  • The Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing is part of UC Davis Health System, an integrated, academic health system encompassing the UC Davis School of Medicine, the 619-bed-acute-care hospital and clinical services of UC Davis Medical Center and the 1000-member physician group known as the UC Davis Medical Group. (ucdavis.edu)
  • mortality
  • Hospital competition, managed care, and mortality after hospitalization for medical conditions in California. (ahrq.gov)
  • The intervention - a combination of effective nursing, hygiene, better nutrition, reduced crowding - reduced mortality significantly. (wikipedia.org)
  • With the advent of antiretroviral therapy (ART/ARV), worldwide health improvements have occurred over the last decades and the result has been a dramatic reduction in HIV-related morbidity and mortality, and improvements in quality of life [ 2 - 5 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • The prevalence of HIV/AIDS is a major public health concern in Rwanda as HIV/AIDS-related mortality has substantial negative social and economic consequences for residents and the government. (wikipedia.org)
  • Other leading causes of infant mortality are birth asphyxia, pneumonia, term birth complications such as abnormal presentation of the foetus umbilical cord prolapse, or prolonged labor, neonatal infection, diarrhea, malaria, measles and malnutrition. (wikipedia.org)
  • Throughout the world, Infant Mortality Rate (IMR) fluctuates drastically, and according to Biotechnology and Health Sciences, education and life expectancy in the country is the leading indicator of IMR. (wikipedia.org)
  • Infant mortality due to low birth weight is usually a direct cause stemming from other medical complications such as preterm birth, poor maternal nutritional status, lack of prenatal care, maternal sickness during pregnancy, and an unhygienic home environments. (wikipedia.org)
  • include
  • The causes of these problems are complex, very often rooted in poverty, and include infections such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Streptococcus pneumonia , and non-communicable conditions such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. (lstmed.ac.uk)
  • Independent risk factors for CRE infection include use of beta-lactam antibiotics and the use of mechanical ventilation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Other important agencies impacting global health include UNICEF and World Food Programme. (wikipedia.org)
  • medical
  • it does not only mean a medical error during the course of medical management and nursing. (ukessays.com)
  • Patient safety is a discipline that emphasizes safety in health care through the prevention, reduction, reporting, and analysis of medical error that often leads to adverse effects. (wikipedia.org)
  • Consequently, the field is more multi-disciplinary, involving, in addition to healthcare professionals and the manufacturers of medical devices or pharmaceuticals, medical economists, sociologists, and public health researchers. (wikipedia.org)
  • Standardized data recording meant that for the first time medical records could be used as a moderately reliable data base for research. (wikipedia.org)
  • Professor and Chair of Medical Microbiology and Immunology Satya Dandekar is leading research on Protecting the Fragile Intestine: Integrating Microbiota and Muscosal Health. (ucdavis.edu)
  • Also, women should seek medical care if they notice any abnormal discharge from the nipples, if breast pain is making it difficult to function each day, or they have prolonged, unexplained breast pain. (wikipedia.org)
  • The healing of pressure ulcers may be slowed by the age of the person, medical conditions (such as arteriosclerosis, diabetes or infection), smoking or medications such as anti-inflammatory drugs. (wikipedia.org)
  • Almost all CRE infections occur in people receiving significant medical care in hospitals, long-term acute care facilities, or nursing homes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Neonatal death is often attributed to inadequate access to basic medical care, during pregnancy and after delivery. (wikipedia.org)
  • CPOE systems use terminology familiar to medical and nursing staff, but there are different terms used to classify and concatenate orders. (wikipedia.org)
  • Jean J. Schensul is a medical anthropologist and senior scientist at The Institute for Community Research, in Hartford, Connecticut. (wikipedia.org)
  • He is founder and chief medical officer of the Providence Health & Services Institute for Human Caring in Torrance, California, and holds appointments as professor of medicine and professor of community health and family medicine at Dartmouth College. (wikipedia.org)
  • He was director of palliative medicine at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, from 2003-14, and associate director for patient and family-centered care at the affiliated Norris-Cotton Cancer Center. (wikipedia.org)
  • While still an intern in 1978-79, Byock teamed with a social work intern to create the Esperanza Care Cooperative, a "fledgling hospice program" for Valley Medical Center in California's Central Valley. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hand washing before administering medicine or medical care can prevent or minimize the spread of disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • Their effects on health were disappointing, though, and in the 1950s and 1960s, nutrition was de-emphasised in standard medical curricula. (wikipedia.org)
  • Since the first claims of medical breakthroughs with vitamin C by Pauling and others, findings on the health effects of vitamin C have been controversial and contradictory. (wikipedia.org)
  • Clinical
  • HIV infection may now be considered a chronic illness because the ARVs suppress HIV replication thereby increasing CD4 cell count, delaying clinical progression of AIDS and prolonging survival [ 6 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • While among the best-rated instruments in terms of validity, including cross-cultural, the Missoula-VITAS Quality of Life Index is considered better in clinical applications, as a psychometric as well as therapeutic tool, than in research. (wikipedia.org)
  • maternal
  • Dubbed I-CAN SZ, the project will test the idea that maternal infection during pregnancy contributes to the development of schizophrenia by altering immune molecules in the brains of offspring, which leads to changes in the way brain cells make connections. (ucdavis.edu)
  • However, progress has been uneven and some of the MDGs were not fully realized including maternal, newborn and child health and reproductive health. (wikipedia.org)
  • Children's Health
  • Unfortunately, for example, take tobacco: It took 50, 60 years of research before policy catches up with what the science is showing- Laura Anderko, professor at Georgetown University and director of the Mid-Atlantic Center for Children's Health and the Environment commenting on public health practices in response to proposal to ban chlorpyrifos pesticide. (wikipedia.org)
  • The "Essential Health Care Program" implemented by the Department of Education in the Philippines is an example of at scale action to promote children's health and education. (wikipedia.org)
  • vaccinations
  • Public health programs providing vaccinations have made strides in promoting health, including the eradication of smallpox, a disease that plagued humanity for thousands of years. (wikipedia.org)
  • infant
  • Also, the chances of getting mastitis increases if women use only one position to breastfeed or wear a tight-fitting bra, which may restrict milk flow Difficulties in getting a nursing infant to latch on to the breast can also increase the risk for mastitis. (wikipedia.org)
  • There are conflicting views on bed-sharing safety and health compared to using a separate infant bed. (wikipedia.org)
  • 99% of infant deaths occur in developing countries, and 86% of these deaths are due to infections, premature births, complications during delivery, and perinatal asphyxia and birth injuries. (wikipedia.org)
  • wounds
  • Except for traumatic wounds, areas that are likely to ulcerate have been associated with increased local skin temperatures due to inflammation and enzymatic autolysis of tissue ( 6 - 8 ). (diabetesjournals.org)
  • Nightingale studied death as her primary outcome, recording the cause of death, including wounds, infections, and other causes. (wikipedia.org)
  • interventions
  • Through her work with community-based approaches to service delivery and social change, Schensul is notable for her development and evaluation of multilevel interventions as well as her work on developing and furthering participatory research in the context of dynamic systems change theory. (wikipedia.org)
  • Faculty
  • These visiting professors will broaden the perspectives of our students, staff and faculty as we work together to advance health and improve care. (ucdavis.edu)
  • UC Davis Health System faculty are among the principal investigators and collaborators awarded funding from the new Research Investments in Sciences and Engineering (RISE) program to conduct innovative, multidisciplinary research in areas of strategic importance to California, the nation and the world. (ucdavis.edu)
  • Five projects are led by UC Davis Health System faculty. (ucdavis.edu)
  • diagnosis
  • Global health employs several perspectives that focus on the determinants and distribution of health in international contexts: Medicine describes the pathology of diseases and promotes prevention, diagnosis, and treatment. (wikipedia.org)
  • processes
  • It includes errors of not doing (omission) or errors of doing (commission), it also includes faults and mistakes of the patient care processes (involving drugs and equipment's) or the environment where these processes are carried out. (ukessays.com)
  • The number of teams involved in providing care and the possibility of breakdowns in communication and coordinated care increases in direct proportion to sophisticated technology and treatment strategies of complex disease processes. (mdpi.com)
  • tuberculosis
  • LSTM's research covers the full spectrum of the complex, often poverty driven, global problems around chronic lung diseases, respiratory infection and Tuberculosis (TB). (lstmed.ac.uk)
  • LSTM's lung health and Tuberculosis (TB) research takes a holistic, person-centred perspective, recognising that men and women, boys and girls experience a heavy burden of lung disease which manifests with a range of symptoms including as disabling coughing, breathlessness, and wheezing. (lstmed.ac.uk)
  • Research within the past 20 years, however, has shown that Asian Americans are at high risk for hepatitis B, liver cancer, tuberculosis, and lung cancer, among other conditions. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1990s
  • In the United States, the full magnitude and impact of errors in health care was not appreciated until the 1990s, when several reports brought attention to this issue. (wikipedia.org)
  • The prevalence rate has remained relatively stable, with an overall decline since the late 1990s, partly due to improved HIV surveillance methodology. (wikipedia.org)
  • physician
  • The standard approach to prevent ulceration is to provide padded insoles and protective shoes, educate the patient and their family, and provide regular foot inspection by the patient's primary care physician or podiatrist. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • From 1982-96 as an emergency physician, mainly in rural and small city settings in Montana, Byock maintained an interest in end-of-life care. (wikipedia.org)
  • challenges
  • NUI Galway's vibrant research community take on some of the most pressing challenges of our times. (nuigalway.ie)
  • Instead, following a three-year global conversation, convened by Alex Jadad, "health" has been conceptualized as the ability to adapt and self manage when individuals and communities face physical, mental or social challenges. (wikipedia.org)
  • Services
  • Supported by AHRQ National Research Services Training Program, no grant number available. (ahrq.gov)
  • The Department of Health and Human Services, 2008, defined a patient safety event as an incident, which takes place during providing a health care service. (ukessays.com)
  • However, some continue to have limited access to sexual and reproductive health services. (hindawi.com)
  • The study explores barriers encountered by couples living with HIV in accessing sexual and reproductive health services using the social ecological model. (hindawi.com)
  • The study findings identify barriers across the five levels of the social ecological model indicating that the use of sexual and reproductive health services is influenced by diverse factors. (hindawi.com)
  • study
  • Obesity counseling and guidelines in primary care: a qualitative study. (ahrq.gov)
  • Aim The aim of this study is to describe the prevalence and patterns of nursing care left undone across European hospitals and explore its associations with nurse-related organisational factors. (bmj.com)
  • Methods Data were collected from 33 659 nurses in 488 hospitals across 12 European countries for a large multicountry cross-sectional study. (bmj.com)
  • When foot temperatures were elevated, subjects were instructed to reduce their activity and contact the study nurse. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • Zysberg will co-teach this fall's doctoral seminar and provide guidance as a methodology expert to students on study design and data analysis. (ucdavis.edu)
  • Her current research is an NIAAA-funded study of drinking and sexual risk among young men in Mumbai, India and a NIMH-funded study of women's reproductive health and sexual risk in Mumbai. (wikipedia.org)
  • Institutes
  • To date, Schensul has founded or cofounded four community-based health social science research institutes, including The Institute for Community Research and the Hispanic Health Council in the United States, the Instituto Nacional de Salud Comunitaria in Peru, and the Center for Intersectoral Community Health Studies in Sri Lanka. (wikipedia.org)
  • prevalence
  • Furthermore, Asia Pacific is anticipated to show significant growth in the forecast period owing to increasing prevalence of chronic diseases, growing number of hospitals and healthcare facilities, and geographical expansion of market players in India, China, Southeast Asia, and Australia. (transparencymarketresearch.com)
  • In general, HIV prevalence is higher in urban areas than in rural areas, and women are at higher risk of HIV infection than men. (wikipedia.org)
  • According to the 2014-2015 Rwanda Demographic and Health Survey (RDHS), "In Rwanda, much of the information on national HIV prevalence is derived from the antenatal care (ANC) sentinel surveillance system. (wikipedia.org)
  • the prevalence in European hospitals ranges from 8.3% to 23% and 26% in Canadian healthcare settings. (wikipedia.org)
  • Global health can be measured as a function of various global diseases and their prevalence in the world and threat to decrease life in the present day. (wikipedia.org)
  • Assessment
  • She also conducts research in the area of instrument design and the validation of assessment tools. (ucdavis.edu)
  • In each decade, a new version of Healthy People is issued, featuring updated goals and identifying topic areas and quantifiable objectives for health improvement during the succeeding ten years, with assessment at that point of progress or lack thereof. (wikipedia.org)
  • emotional
  • Besides physical developmental advantages, co-sleeping may also promote long-term emotional health. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mental, intellectual, emotional, and social health referred to a person's ability to handle stress, to acquire skills, to maintain relationships, all of which form resources for resiliency and independent living. (wikipedia.org)
  • reproductive
  • In addition, information gatekeepers, both formal and informal, should be empowered with knowledge about sexual and reproductive health, including HIV and AIDS. (hindawi.com)
  • With a broader spectrum of reproductive options available to PLWH, evidence emerging from research conducted in developing countries indicates that ART may encourage PLWH receiving treatment to reconsider their reproductive decisions such as getting married and having children [ 2 , 4 , 5 , 9 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • The inclusion of HIV testing in the 2005, 2010, and 2014-15 RDHS surveys offer[ed] the opportunity to better understand the magnitude and patterns of infection in the general population of reproductive age, including men age 15-59 who are not tested as part of antenatal sentinel surveillance. (wikipedia.org)
  • antibiotics
  • When infection is present, antibiotics such as cephalexin may be recommended. (wikipedia.org)
  • Antibiotics were not shown effective in prevention of lactation abscess but are useful to treat a secondary infection (see the section on the treatment of breast abscess in this article). (wikipedia.org)
  • Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) or carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE) are Gram-negative bacteria that are resistant to the carbapenem class of antibiotics, considered the drugs of last resort for such infections. (wikipedia.org)
  • emphasizes
  • Economics emphasizes the cost-effectiveness and cost-benefit approaches for the optimal allocation of health resources. (wikipedia.org)
  • Drug Abuse
  • Her research with HIV and substance abuse has been funded by the National Institute on Aging (NIA), National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), and National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), with grants totaling over $35,000,000. (wikipedia.org)
  • Methods
  • Initial criticisms of the methodology in the IOM estimates focused on the statistical methods of amplifying low numbers of incidents in the pilot studies to the general population. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dr. Schensul is most notable for her research on HIV/AIDS prevention and other health-related research in the United States, as well as her extensive writing on ethnographic research methods. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dr. Schensul is also the co-author of The Ethnographer's Toolkit, a seven book series that details ethnographic and qualitative research methods at every stage of the research process. (wikipedia.org)
  • System
  • In 1999, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the National Academy of Sciences released a report, To Err is Human: Building a Safer Health System. (wikipedia.org)
  • Portability The system accepts and manages orders for all departments at the point-of-care, from any location in the health system (physician's office, hospital or home) through a variety of devices, including wireless PCs and tablet computers. (wikipedia.org)
  • The United Nations system has also played a part with cross-sectoral actions to address global health and its underlying socioeconomic determinants with the declaration of the Millennium Development Goals and the more recent Sustainable Development Goals. (wikipedia.org)