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  • infectious
  • Those involved in the care of athletes should be alert to the possibility of infectious disease for the following reasons: There is the chance, or even the expectation, of contact or collision with another player, or the playing surface, which may be a mat or artificial turf. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] In the United States, OSHA standards require that employers must provide readily accessible hand washing facilities, and must ensure that employees wash hands and any other skin with soap and water or flush mucous membranes with water as soon as feasible after contact with blood or other potentially infectious materials (OPIM). (wikipedia.org)
  • They often also provide addiction counseling services, infectious disease testing, and in some cases mental health care and/or other case management. (wikipedia.org)
  • Infections
  • Hospitals and extended care facilities have higher rates of exposure to MRSA and other multi-drug resistant infections. (in.gov)
  • Additional precautions were not needed for blood-borne infections, unless there were complicating factors. (wikipedia.org)
  • Infection control addresses factors related to the spread of infections within the healthcare setting (whether patient-to-patient, from patients to staff and from staff to patients, or among-staff), including prevention (via hand hygiene/hand washing, cleaning/disinfection/sterilization, vaccination, surveillance), monitoring/investigation of demonstrated or suspected spread of infection within a particular health-care setting (surveillance and outbreak investigation), and management (interruption of outbreaks). (wikipedia.org)
  • employee
  • A Hoosier healthcare organization that embraced safe patient handling to reduce employee exposure to hazards associated with manually lifting, moving and transporting patients and residents was Union Hospital, Inc. By embracing safe patient handling Union Hospital was able to cut injuries nearly in half. (in.gov)
  • hepatitis
  • Body substance isolation is a practice of isolating all body substances (blood, urine, feces, tears, etc.) of individuals undergoing medical treatment, particularly emergency medical treatment of those who might be infected with illnesses such as HIV, or hepatitis so as to reduce as much as possible the chances of transmitting these illnesses. (wikipedia.org)
  • Risk
  • Over the years, the healthcare rate has remained high despite decreases in the injury rates in both manufacturing and construction, which have traditionally been considered industry categories with higher risk for worker injury and illness. (in.gov)
  • Various other occupations are also at increased risk of needlestick injury, including law enforcement, laborers, tattoo artists, food preparers, and agricultural workers. (wikipedia.org)
  • Other workplace hazards have been shown to increase risk of pulmonary heart disease, stroke, and high blood pressure. (wikipedia.org)
  • Veterinary health workers, including veterinarians, are at risk for exposure to zoonotic disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • and tattooists and piercers, who risk exposure to blood-borne pathogens. (wikipedia.org)
  • Workers in certain fields, such as musicians, mine workers, and even those involved with stock car racing, are exposed to higher levels of noise and therefore are at a higher risk of developing hearing loss. (wikipedia.org)
  • hospitals
  • The findings indicate that use of blunt needles was associated with statistically significant reductions in PI rates, minimal clinically apparent adverse effects on patient care, and general acceptance by gynecologic surgeons in these hospitals. (cdc.gov)
  • Healthcare workers can be found in hospitals, clinics, dental offices, out-patient surgery centers, birthing centers as well as nursing homes and other assistance positions. (in.gov)
  • practice
  • Infection control and hospital epidemiology are akin to public health practice, practiced within the confines of a particular health-care delivery system rather than directed at society as a whole. (wikipedia.org)
  • The practice of BSI was common in Pre-Hospital care and emergency medical services due to the often unknown nature of the patient and his/her disease or medical conditions. (wikipedia.org)
  • prevention
  • Needlestick Safety and Prevention Act, effective date 2001 Two lawyers, Mike Weiss and Paul Danzinger, were approached in 1998 by an inventor, Thomas Shaw, who was having trouble selling a safety syringe developed to protect health care workers from accidentally being infected by dirty needles. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is on this basis that the common title being adopted within health care is "infection prevention and control. (wikipedia.org)
  • Guidelines
  • Health Canada Laboratory Biosafety Guidelines Provincial Legislation: British Columbia Alberta Manitoba Saskatchewan Ontario Nova Scotia No nationwide legislation is in place, but suggested practices or policies have been implemented in New South Wales, Victoria, and Queensland. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the United States, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) conduct workplace investigations and research addressing workplace health and safety hazards resulting in guidelines. (wikipedia.org)
  • common
  • Tuberculosis is significantly more common in nursing homes and extended care facilities. (in.gov)
  • In common-law jurisdictions, employers have a common law duty to take reasonable care of the safety of their employees. (wikipedia.org)
  • syringes
  • Some brands of spring-loaded syringes can have a splatter effect, where blood and fluids are sprayed off the cannula from the force of the retraction. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Nigerian government issued an October 1, 2012 deadline for phasing out of conventional syringes and usage of auto-disable syringes in its health institutions. (wikipedia.org)
  • These roles often require the use of syringes for blood draws or to administer medications. (wikipedia.org)
  • hazards
  • Health has been defined as It contrasts, for example, with the promotion of health and safety at work, which is concerned with preventing harm from any incidental hazards, arising in the workplace. (wikipedia.org)
  • Psychosocial hazards are occupational hazards that affect someone's social life or psychological health. (wikipedia.org)
  • directly
  • The initial remit of the Inspectorate was to police restrictions on the working hours in the textile industry of children and young persons (introduced to prevent chronic overwork, identified as leading directly to ill-health and deformation, and indirectly to a high accident rate). (wikipedia.org)
  • Professionals
  • In the UK healthcare professionals have adopted the 'Ayliffe Technique', based on the 6 step method developed by Graham Ayliffe, JR Babb and AH Quoraishi. (wikipedia.org)
  • medical
  • It should be used for the cleaning of the medical instruments or gloves, and basically any type of medical item that comes into contact with the blood stream and sterile tissues. (wikipedia.org)
  • control
  • Infection control is the discipline concerned with preventing nosocomial or healthcare-associated infection, a practical (rather than academic) sub-discipline of epidemiology. (wikipedia.org)
  • According
  • According to the most recent Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) report, the healthcare and social assistance industry now has the second highest injury and illness rate in Indiana. (in.gov)