• HCWs
  • This report summarizes recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) concerning the use of certain immunizing agents in health-care workers (HCWs) in the United States. (cdc.gov)
  • In addition to HCWs in hospitals and health departments, these recommendations apply to those in private physicians' offices, nursing homes, schools, and laboratories, and to first responders. (cdc.gov)
  • Any medical facility or health department that provides direct patient care is encouraged to formulate a comprehensive immunization policy for all HCWs. (cdc.gov)
  • Risk
  • Over the years, the healthcare rate has remained high despite decreases in the injury rates in both manufacturing and construction, which have traditionally been considered industry categories with higher risk for worker injury and illness. (in.gov)
  • Depending on the tasks he or she performs, any health-care or public safety worker may be at high risk for HBV exposure. (cdc.gov)
  • Various other occupations are also at increased risk of needlestick injury, including law enforcement, laborers, tattoo artists, food preparers, and agricultural workers. (wikipedia.org)
  • Other workplace hazards have been shown to increase risk of pulmonary heart disease, stroke, and high blood pressure. (wikipedia.org)
  • Veterinary health workers, including veterinarians, are at risk for exposure to zoonotic disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • Workers in certain fields, such as musicians, mine workers, and even those involved with stock car racing, are exposed to higher levels of noise and therefore are at a higher risk of developing hearing loss. (wikipedia.org)
  • hospitals
  • The findings indicate that use of blunt needles was associated with statistically significant reductions in PI rates, minimal clinically apparent adverse effects on patient care, and general acceptance by gynecologic surgeons in these hospitals. (cdc.gov)
  • Healthcare workers can be found in hospitals, clinics, dental offices, out-patient surgery centers, birthing centers as well as nursing homes and other assistance positions. (in.gov)
  • prevention
  • Health institutions should bear the cost for vaccinating staff and efforts should be made for appropriate health education regarding hepatitis B infection and its prevention. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Needlestick Safety and Prevention Act, effective date 2001 Two lawyers, Mike Weiss and Paul Danzinger, were approached in 1998 by an inventor, Thomas Shaw, who was having trouble selling a safety syringe developed to protect health care workers from accidentally being infected by dirty needles. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is on this basis that the common title being adopted within health care is "infection prevention and control. (wikipedia.org)
  • The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) state that "It is well documented that the most important measure for preventing the spread of pathogens is effective handwashing. (wikipedia.org)
  • Workplace Safety
  • Learn more about this workplace safety and health initiative by watching the onsite media event and exploring this new webpage! (in.gov)
  • The Key to Workplace Safety and Health: Be Proactive! (in.gov)
  • practice
  • Body substance isolation is a practice of isolating all body substances (blood, urine, feces, tears, etc.) of individuals undergoing medical treatment, particularly emergency medical treatment of those who might be infected with illnesses such as HIV, or hepatitis so as to reduce as much as possible the chances of transmitting these illnesses. (wikipedia.org)
  • The practice of BSI was common in Pre-Hospital care and emergency medical services due to the often unknown nature of the patient and his/her disease or medical conditions. (wikipedia.org)
  • Infection control and hospital epidemiology are akin to public health practice, practiced within the confines of a particular health-care delivery system rather than directed at society as a whole. (wikipedia.org)
  • mucous membranes
  • The guideline recommended wearing gloves when collecting or handling blood and body fluids contaminated with blood, wearing face shields when there was danger of blood splashing on mucous membranes and disposing of all needles and sharp objects in puncture-resistant containers. (wikipedia.org)
  • guidelines
  • Health Canada Laboratory Biosafety Guidelines Provincial Legislation: British Columbia Alberta Manitoba Saskatchewan Ontario Nova Scotia No nationwide legislation is in place, but suggested practices or policies have been implemented in New South Wales, Victoria, and Queensland. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the United States, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) conduct workplace investigations and research addressing workplace health and safety hazards resulting in guidelines. (wikipedia.org)
  • common
  • Tuberculosis is significantly more common in nursing homes and extended care facilities. (in.gov)
  • In common-law jurisdictions, employers have a common law duty to take reasonable care of the safety of their employees. (wikipedia.org)
  • syringes
  • Some brands of spring-loaded syringes can have a splatter effect, where blood and fluids are sprayed off the cannula from the force of the retraction. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Nigerian government issued an October 1, 2012 deadline for phasing out of conventional syringes and usage of auto-disable syringes in its health institutions. (wikipedia.org)
  • These roles often require the use of syringes for blood draws or to administer medications. (wikipedia.org)
  • hazards
  • Health has been defined as It contrasts, for example, with the promotion of health and safety at work, which is concerned with preventing harm from any incidental hazards, arising in the workplace. (wikipedia.org)
  • Psychosocial hazards are occupational hazards that affect someone's social life or psychological health. (wikipedia.org)
  • chronic
  • 1 Infection may be transmitted by either a chronic carrier of hepatitis B or an asymptomatic health care worker who is incubating the disease. (bmj.com)
  • The initial remit of the Inspectorate was to police restrictions on the working hours in the textile industry of children and young persons (introduced to prevent chronic overwork, identified as leading directly to ill-health and deformation, and indirectly to a high accident rate). (wikipedia.org)