• 1996
  • R. Lepnurm "Challenges for Long Term Care Management" , pp 405-439 chapter 18 of Issues & Challenges for Long-Term Care editors Eleanor Sawyer & Marion Stephenson, CHA Press, Canadian Healthcare Association, January 1996. (usask.ca)
  • R. Lepnurm "The Objectives of Paying Doctors: Views from Saskatchewan" , Journal of Ambulatory Care Management , 1996: 19(2), 44-58. (usask.ca)
  • citation needed] A major nursing home reform initiative occurred in 1996 when the Health Care Financing Administration studied its own facilities and reported to the US Congress on the effectiveness of its current system and certification of nursing homes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Guest Editor) Issues of Mental Health Nursing Vol. 17, 3, 1996. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1997
  • She earned a Master of Science in Nursing from Case Western Reserve University in 1987 and a PhD from the same school in 1997. (wikipedia.org)
  • R. Lepnurm Financial Management of the Health Care System of Estonia, commissioned paper for the Ministry of Education of Estonian under contract with the Estonian Business School, April 1997, Tallinn, Estonia. (usask.ca)
  • According to Luker et al (1997), in 1985 the Royal College of Nursing (RCN) made a case for the prescribing rights for nurse. (bartleby.com)
  • patient's
  • The biological, physical, cognitive and psychological changes associated with aging are explored, with students learning to utilize this information when evaluating a patient's current health status and future health risks. (study.com)
  • For example, a concern to promote beneficence may be expressed in traditional medical ethics by the exercise of paternalism, where the health professional makes a decision based upon a perspective of acting in the patient's best interests. (wikipedia.org)
  • patients
  • Comfort can enhance health-seeking behaviors for patients, family members, and nurses. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dignity in the care of patients and clients of all ages, whether in hospital or community settings, is an area of increasing national and international importance and concern. (alibris.com)
  • Thomas and Pollio, authors of numerous publications, have written a must-read book for nurses and other health care providers who want to understand and engage in the human experiences of patients. (springerpub.com)
  • The authors provide wonderful insights for students, researchers, and clinicians into the world of existential phenomenology and share, through the use of this research methodological approach, the personal stories of patients as they lived their experiences. (springerpub.com)
  • I can not think of a better way for neophyte nurses to engage the human experiences and perspectives of their patients, nor can I think of a more relevant and comprehensive explanation of the philosophy and methods of existential phenomenology for seasoned researchers, scientists, and theoreticians. (springerpub.com)
  • Among the areas visited were restorative spaces for the nurses, a sibling art area in the hospital's Neonatal Intensive Care Unit and art carts put together for adult and pediatric patients. (keepingyouwell.com)
  • Establish a caring relationship with patients. (keepingyouwell.com)
  • Spend uninterrupted time with patients - something Watson calls "caring moments. (keepingyouwell.com)
  • You will focus on managing care of critically ill (level 3), patients and will evaluate guidelines and evidence underpinning methods of assessment and therapeutic intervention. (wlv.ac.uk)
  • Forensic Nurses in the community make the alleviation of pain and trauma better for patients. (bartleby.com)
  • The nurses within Nurse Jackie are portrayed as nurses who are hard working and actually care for their patients. (bartleby.com)
  • Organizations such as hospitals must balance income with expenditures, and nurses and patients may be affected by these decisions. (bartleby.com)
  • In 1987, a report examined the nursing home problem in Wisconsin which involved 4,000 people, 80% under 65 years of age with an average of 110 patients per facility. (wikipedia.org)
  • Being able to respond to the vulnerability of patients in a way that provides dignifying care is a key concept in the field. (wikipedia.org)
  • Pussin and Pinel's approach was seen as remarkably successful and they later brought similar reforms to a mental hospital in Paris for female patients, La Salpetrière. (wikipedia.org)
  • speech and langu
  • Undergraduate programs Adolescence Adolescence/special education e programs Childhood/early childhood education Childhood/special education Music education Visual arts education Graduate programs Adolescence education Early childhood/childhood education Special education or TESOL The Molloy College Division of Natural Sciences consists of programs in mathematics and computer studies, allied health sciences and speech and language pathology. (wikipedia.org)
  • discipline
  • Nursing practice theories are usually defined to an exact community or discipline. (wikipedia.org)
  • Orem's conceptualizations have provided a mental model essential to the development of nursing as a discipline of knowledge-a practical science with applied sciences and the foundational nursing sciences. (questia.com)
  • Nurse Ratched A sexless, rigid caricature of a nurse, Nurse Ratched imposes discipline on her ward with all the fervour of an Army Nurse, which she had been. (bartleby.com)
  • Erickson, H. Ed. (2010) Exploring the Interface Between the Philosophy and Discipline of Holistic Nursing : Modeling and Role-Modeling at Work. (wikipedia.org)
  • Moral treatment was an approach to mental disorder based on humane psychosocial care or moral discipline that emerged in the 18th century and came to the fore for much of the 19th century, deriving partly from psychiatry or psychology and partly from religious or moral concerns. (wikipedia.org)
  • behaviors
  • Studies in HSR investigate how social factors, health policy, financing systems, organizational structures and processes, medical technology, and personal behaviors affect access to health care, the quality and cost of health care, and quantity and quality of life. (wikipedia.org)
  • from the Greek syn "together" and the Latin actio "action," resulting in: "together in action"]) suggests that development of the human fetus, and later newborn, proceeds through the constant balancing of approach and avoidance behaviors, leading to: 1) a continuous interaction of the subsystems (i.e. (wikipedia.org)
  • framework
  • Students focus initially on liberal arts courses that provide a framework for their chosen major in nursing. (trinitydc.edu)
  • Art Communications English Interdisciplinary Studies Modern Languages Music Philosophy Theology and Religious Studies New Media One of the largest and most-respected programs in the nation, Molloy's curriculum promotes a humanistic approach to nursing, integrating theory and clinical practice opportunities within a framework of ethical decision-making. (wikipedia.org)
  • Following publication of an advanced practice registered nursing textbook using the theory as a framework, the theory was cited and discussed in graduate nursing textbooks, in graduate nursing courses and in nursing agency manuals. (wikipedia.org)
  • With a framework that is interdisciplinary in nature, organizational information theory's desire to eliminate both ambiguity and complexity from workplace messaging builds upon earlier findings from general systems theory and phenomenology. (wikipedia.org)
  • By allowing us to consider the organization in this alternative framework, Organizational Information Theory provides us with a robust platform from which to explore the communication process, literally, as it unfolds. (wikipedia.org)
  • Media richness theory, sometimes referred to as information richness theory or MRT, is a framework used to describe a communication medium's ability to reproduce the information sent over it. (wikipedia.org)
  • The theory includes a framework with axes going from low to high equivocality and low to high uncertainty. (wikipedia.org)
  • This theory gives professionals the framework and tools with which to identify the infant's strengths, challenges and accomplishments. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1994
  • 2007: Distinguished Alumni Award, The Cleveland General and St. Luke's Nurses' Alumni Association 1994-Present: Who's Who in American Nursing The Comfort Theory (CT) is a broad-scope middle range theory because it contains concepts and relationships, is adaptable to a wide range of practice settings and experiences, can be built from many sources and it can be tested and measured. (wikipedia.org)
  • Helvie, C (1994) Helvie's Energy Theory of Family Nursing. (wikipedia.org)
  • perspectives
  • The Canadian Nursing Issues and Perspectives. (hud.ac.uk)
  • Compared with medical research, HSR is a relatively young science that developed through the bringing together of social science perspectives with the contributions of individuals and institutions engaged in delivering health services. (wikipedia.org)
  • Orem's
  • The environment as stressed in Orem's self-care theory comprises of elements with which man interacts within an attempt to maintain self-care (Timby, 2009, p. 7). (bartleby.com)
  • humanistic
  • While addressing a wide readership, this book focuses particularly on the nurse clinician and student, demonstrating how a humanistic philosophy and research methodology has the potential to illuminate the deeper meanings of health crises and universal human experiences like pain and spiritual distress. (springerpub.com)
  • principles
  • Theory refers to "a coherent group of general propositions used as principles of explanation" In the early part of nursing's history, there was little formal nursing knowledge. (wikipedia.org)
  • The importance of ethical principles, accountability and legal issues that surround nurse prescribing will be demonstrated. (bartleby.com)
  • Ethical theories and principles c. (radford.edu)
  • Whereas bioethics tends to deal with more broadly-based issues like the consecrated nature of the human body and the roles of science and technology in healthcare, medical ethics is specifically focused on applying ethical principles to the field of medicine. (wikipedia.org)
  • In Nursing for Public Health: Promotion, Principles, and Practice. (wikipedia.org)
  • Nursing ethics shares many principles with medical ethics, such as beneficence, non-maleficence and respect for autonomy. (wikipedia.org)
  • Nursing ethics is more concerned with developing the caring relationship than broader principles, such as beneficence and justice. (wikipedia.org)
  • This is considered by its advocates to emphasise relationships over abstract principles and therefore to reflect the caring relationship in nursing more accurately than other ethical views. (wikipedia.org)
  • These principles are intended to ensure experiments can be reproduced measurably given the same conditions, allowing further investigation to determine whether a hypothesis or theory related to given phenomena is both valid and reliable. (wikipedia.org)
  • Master's
  • My experience has been undeniably helpful in advancing my knowledge base as a Master's prepared nurse and furthering my professional career advancement. (samuelmerritt.edu)
  • Classes are usually offered as part of master's degree or postgraduate certificate programs in geriatric nursing, although some schools may also offer doctoral programs. (study.com)
  • perspective
  • Case management emphasizes collaborative methods of coordination, continuity, and quality of care within a cost-sensitive perspective. (samuelmerritt.edu)
  • Bioethics-A Nursing Perspective. (hud.ac.uk)
  • Research Perspective boxes in each chapter summarize key nursing management studies, with a consistent format that outlines the purpose, methods, results, and conclusions of each study. (elsevier.com)
  • Nursing research: a qualitative perspective. (wikipedia.org)
  • Phenomenology
  • As thought-provoking as the research examples are, the chapters explaining philosophy and methods of existential phenomenology are essential reading for all nursing students. (springerpub.com)
  • issues
  • Current issues and trends influencing the health care delivery system, such as increased use of technology, rising health care costs, and maintaining quality in health care agencies are among the topics of discussion. (trinitydc.edu)
  • First, the urgency of the issues facing health and social care means that the commission should be required to report within 12 months. (kingsfund.org.uk)
  • R. Lepnurm & M.Neufeld (2002) "Challenges for Long Term Care Management" , concluding chapter of Issues & Challenges for Long-Term Care (2nd edition) editors Eleanor Sawyer & Marion Stephenson, CHA Press, Canadian Hospital Association Press, Ottawa, pp. 421-446. (usask.ca)
  • and ethicallegal issues related to health care delivery. (radford.edu)
  • 4. Analyze current ethical and legal issues related to adult health nursing. (radford.edu)
  • Complete coverage of management issues gives you a solid understanding of financial management, technology, nursing informatics, legal and ethical issues, error reduction, quality improvement, recruitment and retention, and personnel evaluation and development. (elsevier.com)
  • Thought-provoking quotations throughout each chapter help relate complex theories and issues to everyday practice. (elsevier.com)
  • Tables, boxes, and illustrations synthesize and streamline complex issues and theories for quick reference. (elsevier.com)
  • Based on contingency theory and information processing theory, MRT explains that richer, personal communication mediums are generally more effective for communicating of equivocal issues than leaner, less rich media. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1998
  • citation needed] By 1998, the President announced new steps for federal oversight including monitoring of poor performance, collection of new fees, and increased focus on nutrition and basic personal care like pressure sores. (wikipedia.org)
  • treatments
  • In the West, homeopathic medicine and naturopathic medicine each arose in the late 19th century as reactions to the largely ineffectual and toxic conventional approaches of the day: purging, bleeding, and treatments with heavy metals such as mercury and arsenicals. (scribd.com)
  • HSR is more concerned with delivery and access to care, in contrast to medical research, which focuses on the development and evaluation of clinical treatments. (wikipedia.org)
  • The approach has been praised for freeing sufferers from shackles and barbaric physical treatments, instead considering such things as emotions and social interactions, but has also been criticised for blaming or oppressing individuals according to the standards of a particular social class or religion. (wikipedia.org)
  • graduate
  • Dale G. Larson, Ph.D., is a Professor of Counseling Psychology at Santa Clara University, where he directs graduate studies in health psychology. (wikipedia.org)
  • Strategies
  • The 8th edition of this popular text has been completely revised and updated to include the latest strategies for improving your nursing leadership and management skills. (elsevier.com)
  • self-care theory
  • 7). In these two definitions of man, it is evident that man as described in the adaptation theory portrays the different dimensions of a man whereas man in the self-care theory is depicted in general. (bartleby.com)
  • Assessment
  • Reproduced with permission from Als, H. Toward a synactive theory of development: Promise for the assessment of infant individuality. (wikipedia.org)
  • foundational
  • This perennial concern is especially prominent in modern political liberalism, wherein health has been understood as the foundational good necessary for public life. (wikipedia.org)
  • contribution
  • They help to define the different particular contribution of nursing with the care of clients. (wikipedia.org)
  • T his publication of the collected papers of Dorothea E. Orem is a significant and valuable contribution to the nursing literature. (questia.com)
  • Mental health nurses make a vital contribution to supporting service users' recovery, working alongside people to help them manage their distress and work towards individualised goals. (nottingham.ac.uk)
  • 1965
  • In the United States, the national social insurance program Medicare, was established by the U.S. federal government in 1965, which guaranteed access to health insurance for Americans aged 65 and older. (wikipedia.org)