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  • 1996
  • R. Lepnurm "Challenges for Long Term Care Management" , pp 405-439 chapter 18 of Issues & Challenges for Long-Term Care editors Eleanor Sawyer & Marion Stephenson, CHA Press, Canadian Healthcare Association, January 1996. (usask.ca)
  • R. Lepnurm "The Objectives of Paying Doctors: Views from Saskatchewan" , Journal of Ambulatory Care Management , 1996: 19(2), 44-58. (usask.ca)
  • citation needed] A major nursing home reform initiative occurred in 1996 when the Health Care Financing Administration studied its own facilities and reported to the US Congress on the effectiveness of its current system and certification of nursing homes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Guest Editor) Issues of Mental Health Nursing Vol. 17, 3, 1996. (wikipedia.org)
  • patient's
  • Overview - One of the key issues in modern healthcare is not only advocacy and patient care, but keeping patient's safe and free from harm. (bartleby.com)
  • The biological, physical, cognitive and psychological changes associated with aging are explored, with students learning to utilize this information when evaluating a patient's current health status and future health risks. (study.com)
  • A large part of the caring model involves helping the patient find meaning in illness and suffering to restore or promote the patient's harmony. (keepingyouwell.com)
  • For example, a concern to promote beneficence may be expressed in traditional medical ethics by the exercise of paternalism, where the health professional makes a decision based upon a perspective of acting in the patient's best interests. (wikipedia.org)
  • Levine's goal was to provide individualized and responsive patient care, that was less focused on medical procedures, and more on the individual patient's context. (wikipedia.org)
  • Judgement (Trophicognosis)- The application of nursing diagnoses which will provide the collected facts with meaning in the context of the patient's circumstance 3. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1997
  • She earned a Master of Science in Nursing from Case Western Reserve University in 1987 and a PhD from the same school in 1997. (wikipedia.org)
  • R. Lepnurm Financial Management of the Health Care System of Estonia, commissioned paper for the Ministry of Education of Estonian under contract with the Estonian Business School, April 1997, Tallinn, Estonia. (usask.ca)
  • speech and langu
  • Undergraduate programs Adolescence Adolescence/special education e programs Childhood/early childhood education Childhood/special education Music education Visual arts education Graduate programs Adolescence education Early childhood/childhood education Special education or TESOL The Molloy College Division of Natural Sciences consists of programs in mathematics and computer studies, allied health sciences and speech and language pathology. (wikipedia.org)
  • patients
  • Comfort can enhance health-seeking behaviors for patients, family members, and nurses. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dignity in the care of patients and clients of all ages, whether in hospital or community settings, is an area of increasing national and international importance and concern. (alibris.com)
  • The authors state that SBP knowledge is one of six core competencies that physicians have to know in order to provide safe and proper care for their patients. (billsimas.com)
  • Course content focuses on the concepts, theory and practice related to obtaining comprehensive health histories for patients of all ages and states of health. (trinitydc.edu)
  • Thomas and Pollio, authors of numerous publications, have written a must-read book for nurses and other health care providers who want to understand and engage in the human experiences of patients. (springerpub.com)
  • The authors provide wonderful insights for students, researchers, and clinicians into the world of existential phenomenology and share, through the use of this research methodological approach, the personal stories of patients as they lived their experiences. (springerpub.com)
  • I can not think of a better way for neophyte nurses to engage the human experiences and perspectives of their patients, nor can I think of a more relevant and comprehensive explanation of the philosophy and methods of existential phenomenology for seasoned researchers, scientists, and theoreticians. (springerpub.com)
  • Among the areas visited were restorative spaces for the nurses, a sibling art area in the hospital's Neonatal Intensive Care Unit and art carts put together for adult and pediatric patients. (keepingyouwell.com)
  • Establish a caring relationship with patients. (keepingyouwell.com)
  • Spend uninterrupted time with patients - something Watson calls "caring moments. (keepingyouwell.com)
  • You will focus on managing care of critically ill (level 3), patients and will evaluate guidelines and evidence underpinning methods of assessment and therapeutic intervention. (wlv.ac.uk)
  • In 1987, a report examined the nursing home problem in Wisconsin which involved 4,000 people, 80% under 65 years of age with an average of 110 patients per facility. (wikipedia.org)
  • Health services research (HSR), also known as health systems research or health policy and systems research (HPSR), is a multidisciplinary scientific field that examines how people get access to health care practitioners and health care services, how much care costs, and what happens to patients as a result of this care. (wikipedia.org)
  • Being able to respond to the vulnerability of patients in a way that provides dignifying care is a key concept in the field. (wikipedia.org)
  • Pussin and Pinel's approach was seen as remarkably successful and they later brought similar reforms to a mental hospital in Paris for female patients, La Salpetrière. (wikipedia.org)
  • Patients will be assessed for challenges to their external and internal environments that may impede their ability to achieve complete wellness and health. (wikipedia.org)
  • behaviors
  • from the Greek syn "together" and the Latin actio "action," resulting in: "together in action"]) suggests that development of the human fetus, and later newborn, proceeds through the constant balancing of approach and avoidance behaviors, leading to: 1) a continuous interaction of the subsystems (i.e. (wikipedia.org)
  • concepts
  • Sister Callista Roy's Adaptation Model of Nursing in 1976 This model comprises the four domain concepts of person, health, environment, and nursing and involves a six step nursing process. (bartleby.com)
  • The Theory of Comfort considers the concepts of relief, ease and transcendence across four dimensions - physical, psychospiritual, sociocultural and environmental. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2007: Distinguished Alumni Award, The Cleveland General and St. Luke's Nurses' Alumni Association 1994-Present: Who's Who in American Nursing The Comfort Theory (CT) is a broad-scope middle range theory because it contains concepts and relationships, is adaptable to a wide range of practice settings and experiences, can be built from many sources and it can be tested and measured. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is broad in the sense that it also considers nursing practice holistically, however the concepts of the theory can be used separately or in combination with each other in nursing practice settings. (wikipedia.org)
  • Theories and concepts that originated in related sciences have been borrowed by nurses to explain and explore phenomena specific to nursing. (wikipedia.org)
  • Grand nursing theories have the broadest scope and present general concepts and propositions. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, these theories may contain concepts that can lend themselves to empirical testing. (wikipedia.org)
  • They present concepts and a lower level of abstraction and guide theory-based research and nursing practice strategies. (wikipedia.org)
  • Nursing model is a consolidation of both concepts and the assumption that combine them into a meaningful arrangement. (wikipedia.org)
  • The main focal point of nursing out of the four various common concepts is the person (patient). (wikipedia.org)
  • International Code for Nurses-Ethical concepts applied to nursing. (hud.ac.uk)
  • Classes cover topics like transcultural concepts, nursing informatics, and applied humanities. (oedb.org)
  • Through six editions of her book, Nursing: Concepts of Practice , and two editions of Concept Formalization in Nursing: Process and Product by the Nursing Development Conference Group, of which Orem was the leader, key contributor, and editor, Orem has provided the theoretical structure upon which to develop and expand nursing knowledge. (questia.com)
  • Myra Levine (a major influence in the nursing profession) set out to find a new and effective method for teaching nursing degree students major concepts and patient care. (wikipedia.org)
  • framework
  • Students focus initially on liberal arts courses that provide a framework for their chosen major in nursing. (trinitydc.edu)
  • Art Communications English Interdisciplinary Studies Modern Languages Music Philosophy Theology and Religious Studies New Media One of the largest and most-respected programs in the nation, Molloy's curriculum promotes a humanistic approach to nursing, integrating theory and clinical practice opportunities within a framework of ethical decision-making. (wikipedia.org)
  • Following publication of an advanced practice registered nursing textbook using the theory as a framework, the theory was cited and discussed in graduate nursing textbooks, in graduate nursing courses and in nursing agency manuals. (wikipedia.org)
  • Media richness theory, sometimes referred to as information richness theory or MRT, is a framework used to describe a communication medium's ability to reproduce the information sent over it. (wikipedia.org)
  • The theory includes a framework with axes going from low to high equivocality and low to high uncertainty. (wikipedia.org)
  • This theory gives professionals the framework and tools with which to identify the infant's strengths, challenges and accomplishments. (wikipedia.org)
  • graduate
  • Prerequisites: None , NURS 562 Advanced Health Assessment This course enables students to develop advanced clinical assessment skills and diagnostic skills appropriate for an advanced practice nursing graduate. (trinitydc.edu)
  • This book fills a void in the nursing research literature and will be welcome to nursing researchers, practitioners, and lower-division undergraduates through graduate students. (springerpub.com)
  • perspectives
  • The Canadian Nursing Issues and Perspectives. (hud.ac.uk)
  • Compared with medical research, HSR is a relatively young science that developed through the bringing together of social science perspectives with the contributions of individuals and institutions engaged in delivering health services. (wikipedia.org)
  • phenomena
  • A theory is a plausible or scientifically acceptable general principle or body of principles offered to explain phenomena. (bartleby.com)
  • The capacity of these theories are limited, and analyzes a narrow aspect of a phenomena. (wikipedia.org)
  • These principles are intended to ensure experiments can be reproduced measurably given the same conditions, allowing further investigation to determine whether a hypothesis or theory related to given phenomena is both valid and reliable. (wikipedia.org)
  • Orem's
  • The environment as stressed in Orem's self-care theory comprises of elements with which man interacts within an attempt to maintain self-care (Timby, 2009, p. 7). (bartleby.com)
  • humanistic
  • While addressing a wide readership, this book focuses particularly on the nurse clinician and student, demonstrating how a humanistic philosophy and research methodology has the potential to illuminate the deeper meanings of health crises and universal human experiences like pain and spiritual distress. (springerpub.com)
  • provision of care
  • Introduction Nursing is a profession that employs the use of the combination of physical science, social science, nursing theory, and technology in the provision of care to others (Sigma Theta Tau International). (bartleby.com)
  • By aiming to address the conservation of energy, structure, and personal and social integrity, Levine's model helps guide nurses in provision of care that will help support the client's health. (wikipedia.org)
  • Master's
  • My experience has been undeniably helpful in advancing my knowledge base as a Master's prepared nurse and furthering my professional career advancement. (samuelmerritt.edu)
  • Classes are usually offered as part of master's degree or postgraduate certificate programs in geriatric nursing, although some schools may also offer doctoral programs. (study.com)
  • Nursing schools offer master's degree programs with a specialization in geriatric nursing leading to positions as geriatric clinical nurse specialists or nurse practitioners. (study.com)
  • 1988
  • In their 1988 article regarding media richness theory, Daft and Lengel state, "The more learning that can be pumped through a medium, the richer the medium. (wikipedia.org)
  • Phenomenology
  • As thought-provoking as the research examples are, the chapters explaining philosophy and methods of existential phenomenology are essential reading for all nursing students. (springerpub.com)
  • adaptation
  • 7). In these two definitions of man, it is evident that man as described in the adaptation theory portrays the different dimensions of a man whereas man in the self-care theory is depicted in general. (bartleby.com)
  • On the other hand, in Roy's adaptation theory, the environment denotes the internal and external forces in a continual state of change (Timby, 2009). (bartleby.com)
  • Adaptation- adaptation consists of how a patient adapts to the realities of their new health situation- the better a patient can adapt to changes in health, the better they are able to respond to treatment and care. (wikipedia.org)
  • focuses
  • This course focuses primarily on the health and well-being of older adults. (study.com)
  • HSR is more concerned with delivery and access to care, in contrast to medical research, which focuses on the development and evaluation of clinical treatments. (wikipedia.org)
  • principles
  • In Nursing for Public Health: Promotion, Principles, and Practice. (wikipedia.org)
  • Whereas bioethics tends to deal with more broadly-based issues like the consecrated nature of the human body and the roles of science and technology in healthcare, medical ethics is specifically focused on applying ethical principles to the field of medicine. (wikipedia.org)
  • Nursing ethics shares many principles with medical ethics, such as beneficence, non-maleficence and respect for autonomy. (wikipedia.org)
  • Nursing ethics is more concerned with developing the caring relationship than broader principles, such as beneficence and justice. (wikipedia.org)
  • This is considered by its advocates to emphasise relationships over abstract principles and therefore to reflect the caring relationship in nursing more accurately than other ethical views. (wikipedia.org)
  • organization
  • What this paper adds The healthcare organization is conceptualized as an open system characterized by energy transformation, a dynamic steady state, negative entropy, event cycles, negative feedback, differentiation, integration and coordination, and equifinality. (billsimas.com)
  • Discussion The healthcare organization is conceptualized as an open system characterized by energy transformation, a dynamic steady state, negative entropy, event cycles, negative feedback, differentiation, integration and coordination, and equifinality. (billsimas.com)
  • With respect to system structure, the NSDT identifies that care is delivered by nurses clustered in work groups that are nested in a department or programme in the larger organization. (billsimas.com)
  • The Synactive Theory of Newborn Behavioral Organization and Development (Synaction n., or Synactive adj. (wikipedia.org)
  • Assessment
  • This course is designed to introduce the experienced clinical nurse to diagnostic reasoning, advanced clinical history taking, and physical assessment for individuals/families across the life span. (trinitydc.edu)
  • Reproduced with permission from Als, H. Toward a synactive theory of development: Promise for the assessment of infant individuality. (wikipedia.org)
  • Assessment- The nurse will observe and speak with the patient, in conjunction with medical reports, results and diagnostic studies to gather information- referred to as the collection of provocative facts. (wikipedia.org)
  • foundational
  • This perennial concern is especially prominent in modern political liberalism, wherein health has been understood as the foundational good necessary for public life. (wikipedia.org)
  • social
  • Two major approaches to contemporary social theory are the Marxian materialist approach and the structural functionalist approach. (bartleby.com)
  • And even if councils take advantage of new powers to increase council tax, social care faces a funding shortfall of approaching £3 billion by the end of the parliament. (kingsfund.org.uk)
  • This kind of reasoning lies behind the decision of Stephen Dorrell, Norman Lamb and Alan Milburn to join forces to call for a cross-party commission on health and social care. (kingsfund.org.uk)
  • Their initiative follows work at The King's Fund by the independent Barker Commission , which proposed a new settlement to end the historic divide between health and social care by moving to a single ring-fenced budget and a single commissioner of local services. (kingsfund.org.uk)
  • The Commission argued for a new funding model to provide adequate resources for social care as well as the NHS, and to align entitlements between health and social care. (kingsfund.org.uk)
  • The Commission proposed that health and social care should account for 11-12 per cent of GDP by 2025 based on international comparisons and affordability. (kingsfund.org.uk)
  • All the more welcome, therefore, that three former senior health ministers have come together to underline the seriousness of the pressures facing health and social care and to argue for a cross-party approach in tackling them. (kingsfund.org.uk)
  • First, the urgency of the issues facing health and social care means that the commission should be required to report within 12 months. (kingsfund.org.uk)
  • The future of health and social care is too important to be left to experts, and now, more than ever, the views and voices of people giving and receiving care need to be heard. (kingsfund.org.uk)
  • Courses cover a variety of topics, including research applications of healthcare, writing in professional nursing, and social and behavioral science. (oedb.org)
  • Social Determinants of Health. (qub.ac.uk)
  • Cardiovascular Technology Health Service Leadership Nuclear Medicine Technology Respiratory Care) Biology, Chemistry, and Environmental Studies Mathematics and Computer Studies Speech-Language Pathology Humanities provide a solid foundation for a career in law, education, publishing, medicine, social policy, business and more. (wikipedia.org)
  • For the most part, however, the philosophy of healthcare is best approached as an indelible component of human social structures. (wikipedia.org)
  • And seeing that healthcare typically ranks as one of the largest spending areas of governmental budgets, it becomes important to gain a greater understanding of healthcare as not only a social institution, but also as a political one. (wikipedia.org)
  • With that said, healthcare ought to "be treated differently from other social goods" in a society. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the United States, the national social insurance program Medicare, was established by the U.S. federal government in 1965, which guaranteed access to health insurance for Americans aged 65 and older. (wikipedia.org)
  • This program prompted many new nursing homes to be set up in the following years, although private nursing homes were already being built from the 1930s as a consequence of the Great Depression and the Social Security Act of 1935. (wikipedia.org)
  • and Health and Social Care Research and Development Many universities have HSR units, a web search can find these with relative ease. (wikipedia.org)
  • The approach has been praised for freeing sufferers from shackles and barbaric physical treatments, instead considering such things as emotions and social interactions, but has also been criticised for blaming or oppressing individuals according to the standards of a particular social class or religion. (wikipedia.org)
  • researchers
  • The Synactive Theory of Development continues to be instrumental in guiding clinicians (e.g., neonatologist, nurses, psychologists, developmental specialists, physical/occupational therapists, etc.) and researchers in their understanding of the often very small steps in development that prematurely born and other high risk newborns attempt to accomplish (which are major steps for their immature or injured brain). (wikipedia.org)
  • beliefs
  • Nursing theories assist the development of nursing in formulating beliefs, values and goals. (wikipedia.org)
  • There are three main key components to a nursing model: - Statement of goal that the nurse is trying to achieve - Set of beliefs and values - Awareness, skills and knowledge the nurse needs to practice. (wikipedia.org)
  • The first important step in development of ideas about nursing is to establish the body approach essential to nursing, then to analyse the beliefs and values around those. (wikipedia.org)
  • Distinguishing scientific facts and theories from pseudoscientific beliefs, such as those found in astrology, alchemy, medical quackery, occult beliefs, and creation science, is part of science education and scientific literacy. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dignity
  • Dignity is an important concept which lies at the heart of nursing. (hud.ac.uk)
  • Nursing elderly people with dignity and respect. (hud.ac.uk)
  • In recent times, the ethics of nursing has also shifted more towards the nurse's obligation to respect the human rights and dignity of the patient and this is reflected in a number of professional codes for nurses, such as in the latest code from the International Council of Nurses. (wikipedia.org)
  • Themes that emphasize the dignity of the patient by promoting a respectful and caring attitude from nurses are also commonly seen. (wikipedia.org)
  • Nurses seek to defend the dignity of those in their care. (wikipedia.org)
  • In terms of standard ethical theory, respecting dignity can also be aligned with having a respect for people and their autonomous choices. (wikipedia.org)