• World Health Organ
  • It is not merely the absence of disease or infirmity, according to the World Health Organization . (wikipedia.org)
  • The World Health Organization (WHO) is the international agency that coordinates and acts on global public health issues. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1 Vaccine hesitancy has been characterized recently by a committee at the World Health Organization as "a behavior, influenced by a number of factors including issues of confidence (do not trust a vaccine or a provider), complacency (do not perceive a need for a vaccine or do not value the vaccine), and convenience (access). (aappublications.org)
  • Mental disorders are often diagnosed in accordance with clinical concepts listed in diagnostic manuals such as the International Classification of Diseases (ICD), edited and used by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the widely used Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), published by the American Psychiatric Association (APA). (wikipedia.org)
  • The World Health Organization recommends that Caesarean section be performed only when medically necessary. (wikipedia.org)
  • Avicenna
  • citation needed] Physicians who wrote on mental disorders and their treatment in the Medieval Islamic period included Muhammad ibn Zakariya al-Razi (Rhazes), the Arab physician Najab ud-din Muhammad[citation needed], and Abu Ali al-Hussain ibn Abdallah ibn Sina, known in the West as Avicenna. (wikipedia.org)
  • outcomes
  • The goal of VBHC is not to minimize costs but to maximize "value," defined as patient outcomes divided by costs. (bcg.com)
  • Over the past several decades, Sweden's health care sector has developed a number of disease registries-vast repositories of data on the outcomes for different patient groups. (bcg.com)
  • The information has helped providers identify value-based treatment protocols, leading to improvements in both efficiency and patient outcomes. (bcg.com)
  • But even among discrete groups of well-off Americans, health care outcomes are, at best, on a par with the basic standard of care in other countries. (bcg.com)
  • Healthcare providers are also being asked to do more, with no increase in funding, or are encouraged to move to new models of funding and care such as patient-centered or outcomes based, rather than fee-for-service. (wikipedia.org)
  • diseases
  • The focus of a public health intervention is to prevent and manage diseases, injuries and other health conditions through surveillance of cases and the promotion of healthy behaviors , communities and environments . (wikipedia.org)
  • Immunizations have led to a significant decrease in rates of vaccine-preventable diseases and have made a significant impact on the health of children. (aappublications.org)
  • healthcare
  • Employment and earnings (not including physicians) for those working in healthcare range from $20,000 to $102,950 annually and requires individuals with diverse educational and technical backgrounds to qualify for positions in the clinical and non-clinical healthcare setting. (bestmedicaldegrees.com)
  • Not all healthcare careers involve direct patient care, but can span careers such as public relations, human resources and computer technology. (bestmedicaldegrees.com)
  • In the United States, for example, a survey by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality found that while health care expenditures doubled between 1994 and 2005, the quality of care-measured in terms of effectiveness, patient safety, timeliness, and patient-centeredness-improved by barely a third. (bcg.com)
  • 1 January 8, 2014 Dear or Editor/News Director: Minnesota s nurse anesthetists will be joining their colleagues across the country to celebrate the 15th annual National Nurse Anesthetists Week, Jan One of the state s most significant but lesser known contributions to healthcare is the development of modern anesthesia techniques at the Mayo Clinic at the turn of the last century. (docplayer.net)
  • online information and health data management and healthcare system integration. (wikipedia.org)
  • prescribe
  • 2 The cost and effectiveness of care are determined largely by the decisions made in each of these settings: which diagnostic tests to run, which drugs to prescribe, which surgical devices to use, and ultimately when to discharge the patient. (bcg.com)
  • shortage
  • Due to the rising cost of compounding and the shortage of drugs, many hospitals have shown a tendency to rely more upon large-scale compounding pharmacies to meet their regular requirement, particularly of sterile-injectable medications. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some specific health professions already have a shortage (i.e. (wikipedia.org)
  • practices
  • Laura Anderko, professor at Georgetown University and director of the Mid-Atlantic Center for Children's Health and the Environment commenting on public health practices in response to proposal to ban chlorpyrifos pesticide. (wikipedia.org)
  • Unfortunately, for example, take tobacco: It took 50, 60 years of research before policy catches up with what the science is showing- Laura Anderko, professor at Georgetown University and director of the Mid-Atlantic Center for Children's Health and the Environment commenting on public health practices in response to proposal to ban chlorpyrifos pesticide. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hospitals, health systems, private practices, long-term care facilities are looking to boost their services with qualified, licensed clinical and support (or ancillary) staff. (bestmedicaldegrees.com)
  • widely
  • Phenobarbital was among the most widely used drugs for the treatment of epilepsy through the 1970s, and as of 2014, remains on the World Health Organizations list of essential medications. (wikipedia.org)
  • Medical
  • The hospital's work with developing specialized computer software systems for medical use in the 1960s led to the development of the MUMPS programming language, which stands for "Massachusetts General Hospital Utility Multi-Programming System," an important programming language and data-base system heavily used in medical applications such as patient records and billing. (wikipedia.org)
  • Because victims of mushroom poisoning will most commonly seek initial medical care in emergency departments, it is important that emergency physicians be familiar with the diverse signs and symptoms of mushroom toxicity. (medscape.com)
  • the quality and thoroughness of their graduate medical training is identical to that of all other physicians. (wikipedia.org)
  • The principal aim of an autopsy is to determine the cause of death, the state of health of the person before he or she died, and whether any medical diagnosis and treatment before death was appropriate. (wikipedia.org)
  • Nonetheless, medical historian Roy Porter cautions against idealising the role of hospitals generally in medieval Islam, stating that "They were a drop in the ocean for the vast population that they had to serve, and their true function lay in highlighting ideals of compassion and bringing together the activities of the medical profession. (wikipedia.org)
  • systems
  • A new approach is needed-one that will reorient health care systems around a more encompassing metric. (bcg.com)
  • be that the hospitals and health systems can do or are doing around them. (coursera.org)
  • It s an expense that insurance and health care systems often shift to sick people and their families through co-pays, uncovered prescriptions, deductibles, lifetime caps and out-of-pocket costs. (docplayer.net)
  • organizations
  • Public health is "the science and art of preventing disease, prolonging life and promoting human health through organized efforts and informed choices of society, organizations, public and private, communities and individuals. (wikipedia.org)
  • profession
  • Nursing is a profession within the health care sector focused on the care of individuals, families, and communities so they may attain, maintain, or recover optimal health and quality of life. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Minnesota Nurse Anesthetists Number One Priority and Passion are one and the Same: Their Patients MINNEAPOLIS (Jan. 8, 2014) In recognition of their profession s commitment to exceptional patient care, Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNAs) in Minnesota are celebrating the 15th annual National Nurse Anesthetists Week, January 19-25, 2014, announced Linda Huber, CRNA, RN, president of the Minnesota Association of Nurse Anesthetists (MANA). (docplayer.net)
  • I take pride in belonging to a profession that places patient safety and education on the top of its list of priorities. (docplayer.net)
  • Practicing in every setting where anesthesia is available, CRNAs are the sole anesthesia professionals in the vast majority of rural hospitals including those in Minnessota and have been the main provider of anesthesia care to U.S. service men and women on the front lines since World War I. About the Minnesota Association of Nurse Anesthetists MANA, with nearly 1,500 members, represents the nurse anesthesia profession in Minnesota. (docplayer.net)
  • children
  • However, there was tentative evidence that children who were born by caesarean had more health problems at age two. (wikipedia.org)
  • treats
  • The hospital employs some of the most talented physicians in the world and treats hundreds of thousands of patients every year. (asbestos.com)
  • Nursing
  • Between 1865 and 1925, hospitals evolved into expensive, modern facilities as they began serving more paying middle-class patients and were subject to the associated financial pressures, according to the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing report. (wtol.com)
  • Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) contains coverage of nursing and allied health literature. (stanford.edu)
  • Catholic orders such as Little Sisters of the Poor, Sisters of Mercy, Sisters of St. Mary, St. Francis Health Services, Inc. and Sisters of Charity built hospitals and provided nursing services during this period. (wikipedia.org)
  • years ago
  • Four years ago, Michael Porter and Elizabeth Teisberg introduced just such a concept-value-based health care (VBHC)-in their book, Redefining Health Care: Creating Value-Based Competition on Results (Harvard Business Press, 2006). (bcg.com)
  • nurse
  • One of them was taken in a hospital near the front in World War I. National Nurse Anesthetists Week recognizes the contributions of nurse anesthesia, as well as the services of nurse anesthetists throughout the state. (docplayer.net)
  • We invite you to share the attached story of nurse anesthesia with your audience, some of whom may be interested in Minnesota s pivotal role in anesthesia or have a general interest in health care. (docplayer.net)
  • Nurse anesthetists have been at the forefront of anesthesia patient safety for 150 years. (docplayer.net)
  • services
  • For example, epidemiology , biostatistics and health services are all relevant. (wikipedia.org)
  • An easy navigable health portal with hundreds of health related products and services. (medexplorer.com)
  • Telehealth involves the distribution of health-related services and information via electronic information and telecommunication technologies. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) distinguishes telehealth from telemedicine in its scope. (wikipedia.org)
  • general
  • Because all those who had sufficient money were cared for at home, Massachusetts General Hospital, like most hospitals that were founded in the 19th century, was intended to care for the poor. (wikipedia.org)
  • 4most consulting - specialising in mens health and nutrition follow our unique program which is designed to improve mens general, sexual and prostrate gland health, aid in the process of sperm production and improve the strength of your erections -everything natural. (medexplorer.com)
  • Saint Marianne Cope, a Sister of St Francis who opened and operated some of the first general hospitals in the United States, instituting cleanliness standards which influenced the development of America's modern hospital system. (wikipedia.org)
  • professionals
  • People who specialize in psychiatry often differ from most other mental health professionals and physicians in that they must be familiar with both the social and biological sciences. (wikipedia.org)
  • people
  • When people fell ill or were injured, they avoided the hospitals, which were seen as death traps and often had filthy, prison-like conditions. (wikipedia.org)
  • common
  • 7 , 8 Physicians stated that the most common reasons parents refused vaccines were that they believed that vaccines are unnecessary (which showed an increase over the 7-year span) and that they had concerns about autism (which declined between survey years). (aappublications.org)
  • Most haleness stimulating and disease staving off strategies in the Common States from a future-based location and view the progeny as an active and controlling deputy in his or her own health. (wgc2010.sk)
  • With the introduction of antiseptics and anesthetics in the 1800s survival of both the mother and baby became common. (wikipedia.org)
  • Medicine
  • Most governments recognize the importance of public health programs in reducing the incidence of disease, disability, and the effects of aging and other physical and mental health conditions, although public health generally receives significantly less government funding compared with medicine. (wikipedia.org)
  • Alternative Medicine Network - Offers effective natural solutions for men and women in the areas of sexual health, hormonal balance, perimenopause, menopause & prostate health. (medexplorer.com)
  • rate
  • Health care costs continue to rise at an alarming rate, far outpacing the growth of both national economies and household incomes. (bcg.com)
  • Other major Western countries face similar challenges, with health care costs consuming nearly 10 percent of GDP and increasing at twice the rate of economic growth. (bcg.com)
  • patients
  • In addition to providing care to the sick, among hungry families, the Sisters would also share their food with patients' hungry family members, striving to help bring health to everyone in their patients' homes, not just the actively ill. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2 fying for patients and physicians alike. (docplayer.net)
  • safety
  • This development raises concerns about patient safety and makes a case for proper regulatory control and monitoring. (wikipedia.org)
  • problems
  • Moreover, while U.S. health care spending per capita vastly exceeds that of any other country, Americans have fewer healthy life years -a measure of how long they live before health problems have a lasting impact on activity-than citizens of most other advanced economies. (bcg.com)
  • often
  • Critics, including pathologist and former JAMA editor George D. Lundberg, have charged that the reduction in autopsies is negatively affecting the care delivered in hospitals, because when mistakes result in death, they are often not investigated and lessons therefore remain unlearned. (wikipedia.org)
  • center
  • The state-of-the-art Mayo Clinic Cancer Center has been designated a National Cancer Institute Comprehensive Cancer Center for over 40 years. (asbestos.com)
  • With locations in Minnesota, Florida and Arizona , the cancer center provides the highest level of patient care. (asbestos.com)
  • data
  • Some health care experts are quick to dismiss VBHC on the grounds that a lack of timely and reliable data, the divergent interests of stakeholders, and the industry's aversion to wholesale transformation would stonewall meaningful progress. (bcg.com)
  • cases
  • This is done through surveillance of cases and health indicators , and through promotion of healthy behaviors. (wikipedia.org)