• antagonist
  • Haloperidol is also a potent antagonist of opiate receptors, and has weak antagonist activity at muscarinic, histamine H1, alpha-adrenergic, and serotonin receptors (Dollery 1991). (inchem.org)
  • The various receptor antagonist actions of haloperidol result in extrapyramidal reactions, orthostatic hypotension, a reduction of seizure threshold, hypothermia, QT and PR prolongation on the ECG, sedation, and antimuscarinic effects. (inchem.org)
  • We investigated the effect of pretreatment with the dopamine D(2) antagonist haloperidol (1.4 mg i.v.) on psychological and physiological responses to MDMA (1.5 mg/kg p.o.) in 14 healthy volunteers using a double-blind placebo-controlled within-subject design. (mdma.net)
  • patients
  • Cases of sudden death, QT-prolongation, and Torsades de Pointes have been reported in patients receiving haloperidol. (nih.gov)
  • This case can indicate the possible existence of increased vulnerability to Haloperidol Decanoate treatment in female patients, resulting in Electrocardiogram Qt Prolonged side effect. (patientsville.com)
  • severe
  • Haloperidol is effective for the treatment of severe behavior problems in children of combative, explosive hyperexcitability (which cannot be accounted for by immediate provocation). (nih.gov)
  • Haloperidol is contraindicated in severe toxic central nervous system depression or comatose states from any cause and in individuals who are hypersensitive to this drug or have Parkinson's disease. (nih.gov)
  • drug
  • Depot forms of haloperidol are also available, which involves the drug being deeply injected into the bodily tissue where it can be slowly released into the body over a period of weeks. (news-medical.net)
  • my doctor decided not to give me the Haloperidol after the reaction I had and to be honest I am so glad he didn't I was really not wanting to try this drug. (drugs.com)
  • Haloperidol also interferes with the action of the anticoagulant (blood-thinning) drug phenindione. (encyclopedia.com)
  • frustration
  • Haloperidol is also effective in the short-term treatment of hyperactive children who show excessive motor activity with accompanying conduct disorders consisting of some or all of the following symptoms: impulsivity, difficulty sustaining attention, aggressivity, mood lability, and poor frustration tolerance. (nih.gov)
  • mood
  • Haloperidol attenuated MDMA-induced positive and mania-like mood but had no reducing effect on other subjective changes or on cardiovascular effects. (mdma.net)
  • pregnancy
  • Following accepted general principles, haloperidol should be given during pregnancy only if the benefit to the mother clearly outweighs the potential fetal risk. (wikipedia.org)
  • increase
  • Haloperidol may increase the action of central nervous system depressants such as anesthetics, alcohol, and opiates (some pain killers and sleeping pills). (encyclopedia.com)
  • less
  • It was 13% more effective than lurasidone and iloperidone, approximately as effective as ziprasidone and asenapine, and 12-16% less effective than haloperidol, quetiapine, and aripiprazole. (wikipedia.org)