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  • Amboseli
  • A lognormal model however provided a good fit to the monthly rate of predation data suggesting that the rate of predation by Amboseli baboons was affected by several factors that acted multiplicatively with respect to each other and were themselves related to rainfall or dryness. (brillonline.com)
  • 6. Estimates of the total number of prey killed annually by Amboseli baboons indicate that baboon predation probably has a negligible effect on prey populations other than vervet monkeys. (brillonline.com)
  • Since infant mortality in Amboseli yellow baboons depends in part on the number and ages of other infants born into the group, pre-ovulatory females that are most susceptible to stress-induced delay or inhibition of ovulation are the most frequent targets of female coalition attacks. (wikipedia.org)
  • Research at the Amboseli Baboon Project centers on processes at the individual, group, and population levels, and in recent years has also included other aspects of baboon biology, such as genetics, hormones, nutrition, hybridization, parasitology, and relations with other species. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Amboseli Baboon Project is based in the Amboseli National Park and southwestern parts of the Amboseli ecosystem, near Kilimanjaro. (wikipedia.org)
  • Over the period of its existence The Amboseli Baboon Project has produced over 230 peer-reviewed articles, reports, and popular accounts. (wikipedia.org)
  • savannah baboons
  • In wild savannah baboons, social affiliations are shown to augment fitness by increasing tolerance from more dominant group members and increasing the chance of obtaining aid from conspecifics during instances of within-group contest interactions. (wikipedia.org)
  • primates
  • Some primates (including some great apes and baboons) are primarily terrestrial rather than arboreal, but all species possess adaptations for climbing trees. (wikipedia.org)
  • The relationships among the different groups of primates were not clearly understood until relatively recently, so the commonly used terms are somewhat confused. (wikipedia.org)
  • Commonly used names for groups of primates such as " prosimians ", " monkeys ", " lesser apes ", and " great apes " reflect this methodology. (wikipedia.org)
  • According to our current understanding of the evolutionary history of the primates, several of these groups are paraphyletic: a paraphyletic group is one which does not include all the descendants of the group's common ancestor. (wikipedia.org)
  • The cladogram below shows one possible classification sequence of the living primates, with groups that use common (traditional) names are shown on the right. (wikipedia.org)
  • Had Darwin known that other primates distinguish kin from non-kin, form enduring relationships with their offspring, selectively groom, support and reconcile conflicts with their relatives and are aware of the kinship relationships between other group members, he would have been even more certain of the deep evolutionary links between humans and other animals. (royalsocietypublishing.org)
  • Within Order Primates, it is the most common social group type, with group sizes ranging from 10 to 100 individuals. (wikipedia.org)
  • Large groups of primates are called "troops. (wikipedia.org)
  • Large groups of primates are called "troops", which are characterized by complex intratroop politics and competition. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] Multi-male groups are most common among semi-terrestrial primates such as savanna baboons and macaques, but is also seen in some colobus and New World monkeys. (wikipedia.org)
  • Africa
  • Simians are divided into two groups: catarrhine (narrow-nosed) monkeys and apes of Africa and Southeast Asia and platyrrhine ("flat-nosed") or New World monkeys of South and Middle America. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is the northernmost of all the baboons, being native to the Horn of Africa and the southwestern tip of the Arabian Peninsula. (wikipedia.org)
  • aggression
  • When aggression in wild group-living male breeders was tested in a neutral test arena, they were nearly five times more aggressive towards their neighbours than towards strangers, leading to the prediction that neighbours are the most important competitors for paternity. (wikipedia.org)
  • gibbons
  • Groups of gibbons with more stable social networks formed grooming networks that were significantly more complex, while groups with low stability networks formed far fewer grooming pairs. (wikipedia.org)
  • affiliations
  • Recent field studies of baboons suggest that male-infant relationships are mediated through affiliations between the males and the infants' mothers, but the degree to which these male-female affiliations are based on prior mating experience (hence, paternity) has not been established. (wikipedia.org)
  • male
  • 2015. The costs of parental and mating effort for male baboons . (upenn.edu)
  • There are costs and benefits for individuals living in one-male groups. (wikipedia.org)
  • As well, individuals within one-male groups can interact with each other just like individuals can interact with those from different one-male groups. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, when a new male successfully enters a one-male group, the social hierarchy will be changed depending on the previously determined rankings of the newly entered male. (wikipedia.org)
  • The previous resident male of the one-male group may be out-ranked and therefore placed lower on the hierarchy of males. (wikipedia.org)
  • One of the costs of living in one-male groups is the killing of unweaned young by conspecific adult males. (wikipedia.org)
  • This is known as infanticide, and mostly occurs when adult males or coalitions of males takeover the group and kill the resident male. (wikipedia.org)
  • Infanticide in one-male groups has been studied in the Virungas population of mountain gorillas. (wikipedia.org)
  • For example, inbreeding has been studied in one-male groups of sun-tailed monkeys (Cercopithecus solatus). (wikipedia.org)
  • However, the findings of feeding advantages were only evident when these one-male groups formed clans. (wikipedia.org)
  • It has been shown that males from single one-male groups did not approach males that were part of clans to compete for food sources. (wikipedia.org)
  • Additionally, it was found that males from smaller clans did not approach males from bigger clans (i.e. with more one-male groups) to compete for food. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ultimately, these feeding advantages of decreased competition were seen between one-male groups, not for males within the same groups or clans. (wikipedia.org)
  • It has been shown that adult female golden snub-nosed monkeys do not form strong social relationships with the resident male in the one-male group. (wikipedia.org)
  • Multi-male groups, also known as multi-male/multi-female, are a type of social organization where the group contains more than one adult male, more than one adult female, and offspring. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] A traditional view of multi-male primate groups is held that males provide relatively little direct care to infants, possibly as a result of the low confidence of paternity that is associated with this relatively promiscuous breeding system. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] In some multi-male groups, the costs for infanticidal males seem likely to be high, since other resident males might defend the victim, and the benefits seem likely to be low because of the generally lower paternal probability in multi-male groups. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] A benefit of living in multi-male groups is the collective protection that the group as a whole receives from outsiders as well as sufficient protection of infants against infanticide from other outside roaming males. (wikipedia.org)
  • Also, participants in multi-male groups have better access to resources such as food and living quarters. (wikipedia.org)
  • Direct correlations between measures of social connectedness (which focuses on social grooming) and median survival time for both female and male baboons were modeled. (wikipedia.org)
  • researchers
  • Many famous researchers, such as Charles Darwin in his book The Descent of Man, mentioned tool-use in monkeys (such as baboons). (wikipedia.org)
  • depend
  • This is particularly useful for behaviors relating to mating strategies whose expression might depend on the context of the social group. (docme.ru)
  • The baboons' drinking activities also depend on the season. (wikipedia.org)
  • female
  • Female attackers are often in advanced stages of pregnancy, and have the most to lose if the number of infants in the group reaches an unsustainable level. (wikipedia.org)
  • among
  • Cooperative hunting has social implications since it helps to maintain and reinforce social relationships among the individuals of a group. (mdpi.com)
  • occurrence
  • Baboons with lower tick loads show decreased occurrence of such infections and display signs of greater health status, evidenced by higher hematocrit (packed red cell volume) levels. (wikipedia.org)
  • relationships
  • These social relationships serve to aid cooperation and facilitate protection against combative groups composed of other males, which can oftentimes cause physical harm. (wikipedia.org)
  • scientific names
  • All groups with scientific names are monophyletic (that is, they are clades), and the sequence of scientific classification reflects the evolutionary history of the related lineages. (wikipedia.org)
  • effects
  • For example, group member connection has the potential to mitigate the potentially harmful effects of stressors. (wikipedia.org)