• steviol glycosides
  • The European Food Safety Authority's scientific Panel on additives, the ANS Panel, has assessed the safety of steviol glycosides, sweeteners extracted from plant leaves, and established an Acceptable Daily Intake for their safe use. (europa.eu)
  • The Panel set an Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI) of 4 mg per kg body weight per day for steviol glycosides, a level consistent with that already established by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA). (europa.eu)
  • Steviol glycosides are intense sweeteners extracted from the leaves of the stevia plant (Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni). (europa.eu)
  • Steviol glycosides are the chemical compounds responsible for the sweet taste of the leaves of the South American plant Stevia rebaudiana (Asteraceae) and the main ingredients (or precursors) of many sweeteners marketed under the generic name stevia and several trade names. (wikipedia.org)
  • Steviol glycosides from Stevia rebaudiana have been reported to be between 30 and 320 times sweeter than sucrose, although there is some disagreement in the technical literature about these numbers. (wikipedia.org)
  • Steviol glycosides stimulate the insulin secretion through potentiation of the β-cell, preventing high blood glucose after a meal. (wikipedia.org)
  • The acceptable daily intake (ADI) for steviol glycosides, expressed as steviol equivalents, has been established to be 4 mg/kg body weight/day, and is based on no observed effects of a 100 fold higher dose in a rat study. (wikipedia.org)
  • The steviol glycosides found in S. rebaudiana leaves, and their weight percentage, include: Stevioside (5-10%) Rebaudioside A (2-4%) Rebaudioside C (1-2%) Dulcoside A (0.5-1%) Rebaudioside B Rebaudioside D Rebaudioside E The last three are present only in minute quantities, and rebaudioside B has been claimed to be a byproduct of the isolation technique. (wikipedia.org)
  • The relative sweetness seems to vary with concentration: a mix of steviol glycosides in the natural proportions was found to be 150 times sweeter than sucrose when matching a 3% sucrose solution, but only 100 times sweeter when matching a 10% sucrose solution. (wikipedia.org)
  • enzymes
  • There are four type of linkages present between glycone and aglycone: C-linkage/glycosidic bond, "nonhydrolysable by acids or enzymes" O-linkage/glycosidic bond N-linkage/glycosidic bond S-linkage/glycosidic bond Glycosides are also classified according to the chemical nature of the aglycone. (wikipedia.org)
  • glucoside
  • The known flavonoid chrysin-7-O-(β-D-glycopyranoside) (chrysin glucoside,1) as a major fraction and a new glycoside flavone, chrysin-7-O-β-D-[(6"-acetyl)glycopyranoside] (2) were isolated from the flowers and leaves of CalycotomeVillosa Subsp. (mdpi.com)
  • Stevia
  • A commercial steviol glycoside mixture extracted from the plant was found to have about 80% stevioside, 8% rebaudioside A, and 0.6% rebaudioside C. The Chinese plant Rubus chingii produces rubusoside, a steviol glycoside not found in Stevia. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bufo
  • Other cardiac glycosides are present in the skin of toads ( Bufo maritimus , B. vulgaris ), but are of toxicological rather than therapeutic interest. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • milkweed): oleandrin Adonis vernalis (Spring pheasant's eye): adonitoxin Kalanchoe daigremontiana and other Kalanchoe species: daigremontianin and others Leonurus cardiaca (motherwort): scillarenin Drimia maritima (squill): proscillaridine A Bufo marinus (cane toad): various bufadienolides Cardiac glycosides affect the sodium-potassium ATPase pump in cardiac muscle cells to alter their function. (wikipedia.org)
  • reaction
  • The molecular extinction coefficients in the xanthydrol reaction of 2-deoxyaldoses and their cardenolide glycosides have been measured. (springer.com)
  • main
  • Cardiac glycosides have long served as the main medical treatment to congestive heart failure and cardiac arrhythmia, due to their effects of increasing the force of muscle contraction while reducing heart rate. (wikipedia.org)
  • known
  • Three new glycosides ( 1 - 3 ) and 15 known ones ( 4 - 18 ) were isolated and identified from the fruits of Nicandra physaloides . (mdpi.com)
  • Three new secoiridoid glycosides, named picrogentiosides A (1), B (2) and C (3), have been isolated from the underground parts of Picrorhiza Scrophulariiflora , together with the two known compounds plantamajoside (4) and plantainoside D (5). (mdpi.com)
  • Three new polyhydroxysteroidal glycosides, hesperuside A ( 1 ), B ( 2 ), and C ( 3 ), as well as a known novaeguinoside A ( 4 ), were isolated from the ethanol extract of starfish Craspidaster hesperus collected from the South China Sea. (mdpi.com)
  • Senna glycoside, also known as sennoside or senna, is a medication used to treat constipation and empty the large intestine before surgery. (wikipedia.org)
  • French
  • The first glycoside ever identified was amygdalin, by the French chemists Pierre Robiquet and Antoine Boutron-Charlard, in 1830. (wikipedia.org)