• whereas
  • and (3) in those organisms where both enzymes are produced (such as Klebsiella and Citrobacter), the genes for them are independently regulated: glycerol dehydratase is induced when Klebsiella pneumoniae grows in glycerol-containing medium, whereas diol dehydratase is fully induced when it grows in propane-1,2-diol-containing medium, but only slightly in the glycerol medium [ PMID: 210157 , PMID: 12230560 ]. (ebi.ac.uk)
  • diol
  • Diol/glycerol dehydratases undergo inactivation during catalysis and require a reactivating factor. (ebi.ac.uk)
  • Radical catalysis of B12 enzymes: structure, mechanism, inactivation, and reactivation of diol and glycerol dehydratases. (ebi.ac.uk)
  • Crude
  • While glycerol is commonly used in food, pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, and other industries, increased production of crude glycerol has become very expensive to purify and utilize in these industries. (wikipedia.org)
  • lipids
  • The polar lipids of the members of Archaea consist of di- and tetraethers of glycerol with isoprenoid alcohols bound at the sn-2 and sn-3 positions of the glycerol moiety. (ebi.ac.uk)
  • backbone
  • One characteristic feature of archaea is that their cellular membrane has an ether linkage between the glycerol backbone and the hydrocarbon residues. (ebi.ac.uk)
  • glucose
  • I am sure anyone this ignorant of biochemistry should probably not be handling DNA, (more likely DNA is all I should be allowed to handle): all the same I would like to know what determines when to use glycerol or glucose in media. (bio.net)
  • In particular, I have one strain for which it is stipulated that glucose must go in the 'rich' media and on the maintenance plates, but glycerol must be used in the 'induction' media. (bio.net)
  • propylene
  • Glycerol is also synthesized on a commercial scale from propylene (obtained by cracking petroleum), since supplies of natural glycerol are inadequate. (encyclopedia.com)
  • vacuum is helpful due to the high boiling point of glycerol (290 °C). Although usually not cost-effective, glycerol can be produced by various routes from propylene. (wikipedia.org)
  • pathway
  • Glycerol has a caloric density similar to table sugar, but a lower glycemic index and different metabolic pathway within the body, so some dietary advocates[who? (wikipedia.org)
  • catalyst
  • Stoiciometrically 1 mole of glycerol reacts with 3 moles of acetic acid + sulphuric acid (catalyst) to yield 1 mole triacetin plus 3 moles of water. (infopop.cc)
  • Anyway stoiciometrically one mole glycerol (73 millilitres) + three moles acetic acid (171 millilitres) + sulphuric acid catalyst (enough) yields one mole triacetin (188 millilitres) + water (about 54 millilitres). (infopop.cc)