• inflammatory
  • Immunosuppressive drugs can be classified into five groups: glucocorticoids cytostatics antibodies drugs acting on immunophilins other drugs In pharmacologic (supraphysiologic) doses, glucocorticoids, such as prednisone, dexamethasone, and hydrocortisone are used to suppress various allergic, inflammatory, and autoimmune disorders. (wikipedia.org)
  • Patients who survive the presenting signs and symptoms endure a chronic thrombotic and inflammatory state, which puts many of them at lifelong elevated risk of sudden blood clotting, kidney failure, other severe complications and premature death. (wikipedia.org)
  • proteinuria
  • Laboratory tests may also reveal low levels of platelets (cells in the blood that aid in clotting), elevated lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, a chemical released from damaged cells, and which is therefore a marker of cellular damage), decreased haptoglobin (indicative of the breakdown of red blood cells), anemia (low red blood cell count)/schistocytes (damaged red blood cells), elevated creatinine (indicative of kidney dysfunction), and proteinuria (indicative of kidney injury). (wikipedia.org)
  • For example, approximately 1 in 6 patients with aHUS initially will present with proteinuria or hematuria without acute kidney failure. (wikipedia.org)
  • outcomes
  • Kidney transplant outcomes from older deceased donors: A paired kidney analysis by the ERA-EDTA Registry. (uah.edu)
  • As the median age of deceased kidney donors rises, updated knowledge of transplant outcomes from older deceased donors in differing donor-recipient age groups is required. (uah.edu)
  • Using ERA-EDTA Registry data we determined survival outcomes of kidney allografts donated from the same older deceased donor (55-70 years), and transplanted into one recipient younger and one recipient of similar age to the donor. (uah.edu)
  • The association between CVD and kidney function has been clearly defined in epidemiological studies in which we have participated, including the Chronic Renal Impairment in Birmingham (CRIB) and London Arterial Calcification, Kidney and Bone Outcomes (LACKABO) cohort studies. (ucl.ac.uk)
  • biopsy
  • The diagnosis of lupus nephritis depends on blood tests, urinalysis, X-rays, ultrasound scans of the kidneys, and a kidney biopsy. (wikipedia.org)
  • But since glomerular disease causes problems at the cellular level, the doctor will probably also recommend a kidney biopsy-a procedure in which a needle is used to extract small pieces of tissue for examination with different types of microscopes, each of which shows a different aspect of the tissue. (nih.gov)
  • chronic
  • Chronic kidney disease in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus infection. (readbyqxmd.com)
  • The prevalence and incidence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is increasing for many reasons - greater public awareness, an ageing population, more advanced and complicated surgery carried out in older patients, and fewer deaths from infection, heart attacks, and some forms of cancer. (ucl.ac.uk)
  • Our research interests surround the causes, progression and complications of chronic kidney disease (CKD) with a focus both on population studies and translation into the laboratory. (ucl.ac.uk)
  • urinalysis
  • Urinalysis provides information about kidney damage by indicating levels of protein and red blood cells in the urine. (nih.gov)
  • Creatinine
  • Blood tests measure the levels of waste products such as creatinine and urea nitrogen to determine whether the filtering capacity of the kidneys is impaired. (nih.gov)
  • bladder
  • A procedure in which a tiny piece of a body part, such as the kidney or bladder , is removed for examination under a microscope. (rightdiagnosis.com)
  • Eventually, the urine drains from the kidneys into the bladder through larger tubes called ureters . (nih.gov)
  • ultrasound
  • If these lab tests indicate kidney damage, the doctor may recommend ultrasound or an x-ray to see whether the shape or size of the kidneys is abnormal. (nih.gov)
  • fluid
  • Everyday, the two kidneys filter about 120 to 150 quarts of blood to produce about 1 to 2 quarts of urine, composed of wastes and extra fluid. (nih.gov)
  • In normal blood, albumin acts like a sponge, drawing extra fluid from the body into the bloodstream, where it remains until the kidneys remove it. (nih.gov)
  • urine
  • As the kidneys inflame, they begin to excrete needed protein from the affected individual's body into the urine stream. (wikipedia.org)