• malaria
  • There is a strong, international consensus that the MDGs explicitly related to health, namely 4 (reduce child mortality), 5 (improve maternal health) and 6 (combat HIV/AIDS, malaria and other diseases), should be integral to the post-2015 agenda. (un.org)
  • prevention and control
  • Most African countries, except South Africa, still have no policies, programmes, or action plans for the prevention and control of neuropsychiatric disorders, 13 despite projections that the burden of neuropsychiatric and mental disorders is likely to increase. (scielo.org.za)
  • The World Heart Federation exists to prevent and control these diseases through awareness campaigns and action, promoting the exchange of information, ideas and science among those involved in cardiovascular care, advocating for disease prevention and control by promoting healthy diets, physical activity and tobacco free living at an individual, community and policy maker level. (wikipedia.org)
  • health
  • On Friday 12 June, Ailiana Santosa, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, unit for Epidemiology and Global Health at Umeå University, defends her dissertation entitled "Where are the world's disease patterns heading? (healthcanal.com)
  • The Global health committee mainly focuses on the detection and management of cardiovascular disease and offers a road map for achieving better outcomes in preventing and treating heart disease. (medindia.net)
  • Specifically, in this report, the committee focuses on the detection and management of cardiovascular disease and offers a roadmap for achieving better outcomes in preventing and treating heart disease, including through screening, accelerated drug development, digital health and smart financing strategies. (medindia.net)
  • The first part of the course provides a basic framework for understanding global public health issues and improvement of health at a population level by exposing students to basic public health concepts of disease burden, standard indices for measuring population-based health, and highlighting global epidemiologic trends. (uab.edu)
  • Each major system will be presented first as normal physiology, then, how genetics and/or specific exposures (voluntary and involuntary) contribute to diseases of public health significance. (uab.edu)
  • New York City had also taken the lead in promoting healthier eating habits, as part of its overall efforts to make reduction of non-communicable diseases a public health priority, he said. (un.org)
  • Echoing Mr. Bloomberg's concerns, General Assembly President Nassir Abdulaziz Al-Nasser said the public health pendulum had swung too far, focusing too much on a few diseases, while denying attention and help to those who suffered and died from less dramatic but no less fatal diseases of the body and mind. (un.org)
  • HeLTI was developed to address the increasing burden of non-communicable diseases (i.e. obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease and poor mental health) around the world. (utoronto.ca)
  • The 'developmental origins of health and disease' (DOHaD) hypothesis proposes that adverse conditions during critical periods of early development permanently 'programme' the body's metabolic tissues and systems , leading to increased susceptibility to disease in later life. (utoronto.ca)
  • The prevalence of obesity in both the developed and developing world have increased, which leads to diverse health outcomes and is placing a heavy burden on the economy. (nwu.ac.za)
  • 12 In its regional strategy for mental health in the Africa Region for the years 2000 - 2010, the WHO also highlighted the increasing burden of poverty, natural disasters, social upheaval, and wars and other forms of violence as major causes of the growing psychosocial problems, which are often compounded by harmful use of alcohol and other substances. (scielo.org.za)
  • The burden of childhood respiratory illness is highest in low and middle income countries (LMICs), reflecting the demographic profile, epidemiology of LRTIs, distribution of risk factors and weak health systems in many settings. (bmj.com)
  • The other 75 percent of their time is spent in field placements, where residents "learn by doing," by participating in outbreak investigations, helping to establish and evaluate disease surveillance systems, designing and conducting studies on problems of public health concern in their country, and training other healthcare workers. (wikipedia.org)
  • Preterm birth is critical for progress on Millennium Development Goal 4 (MDG) for child survival by 2015 and beyond, and gives added value to maternal health (MDG 5) investments also linking to non-communicable diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • For preterm babies who survive, the additional burden of prematurity-related disability may affect families and health systems. (wikipedia.org)
  • The WHO's World Health Report 2002 identified five important risk factors for non-communicable disease in the top ten leading risks to health. (wikipedia.org)
  • This was driven by a rise in both communicable and non-communicable diseases and declining access to health services, especially for the poor. (wikipedia.org)
  • Disease burden is the impact of a health problem as measured by financial cost, mortality, morbidity, or other indicators. (wikipedia.org)
  • One DALY can be thought of as one year of healthy life lost, and the overall disease burden can be thought of as a measure of the gap between current health status and the ideal health status (where the individual lives to old age free from disease and disability). (wikipedia.org)
  • According to an article published in The Lancet in June 2015, low back pain and major depressive disorder were among the top ten causes of YLDs and were the cause of more health loss than diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and asthma combined. (wikipedia.org)
  • The study based on data from 188 countries, considered to be the largest and most detailed analysis to quantify levels, patterns, and trends in ill health and disability, concluded that "the proportion of disability-adjusted life years due to YLDs increased globally from 21.1% in 1990 to 31.2% in 2013. (wikipedia.org)
  • These measures allow for comparison of disease burdens, and have also been used to forecast the possible impacts of health interventions. (wikipedia.org)
  • The World Health Organization (WHO) has provided a set of detailed guidelines for measuring disease burden at the local or national level. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 2004, the World Health Organization calculated that 1.5 billion disability-adjusted life years were lost to disease and injury. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Center for Disease Dynamics, Economics & Policy (CDDEP) is a public health research organization with headquarters in Washington, D.C. and New Delhi. (wikipedia.org)
  • A joint effort of The World Bank, the Fogarty International Center of the National Institutes of Health, and the World Health Organization, with substantial technical input from CDDEP researchers, DCPP was launched in 2001 as a four-year initiative to improve the health of people in developing countries by identifying disease control priorities based on scientific evidence and cost-effectiveness. (wikipedia.org)
  • by introducing Universal Health Coverage in the years to come As a guidance to achieve this goal, The Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME) and World Health Organization (WHO) recently[update] published the report "Namibia: State of the Nation's Health: Findings from the Global Burden of Disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • The report backs the fact that Namibia has made steadily progress in the last decades when it comes to general health and communicable diseases, but despite this progress, HIV/AIDS still is one of the big reasons for health loss in the country. (wikipedia.org)
  • The correlation between diabetes mellitus and TB concerns public health as it merges communicable and non-communicable diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although women in industrialised countries have narrowed the gender gap in life expectancy and now live longer than men, in many areas of health they experience earlier and more severe disease with poorer outcomes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Other important health issues for women include cardiovascular disease, depression, dementia, osteoporosis and anemia. (wikipedia.org)
  • Women's experience of health and disease differ from those of men, due to unique biological, social and behavioural conditions. (wikipedia.org)
  • Just as health comprises a variety of physical and mental states, so do disease and disability, which are affected by environmental factors, genetic predisposition, disease agents, and lifestyle choices. (wikipedia.org)
  • Health, disease, and disability are dynamic processes which begin before individuals realize they are affected. (wikipedia.org)
  • Public health is "the science and art of preventing disease, prolonging life and promoting human health through organized efforts and informed choices of society, organizations, public and private, communities and individuals. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is not merely the absence of disease or infirmity, according to the World Health Organization. (wikipedia.org)
  • Public health aims to improve the quality of life through prevention and treatment of disease, including mental health. (wikipedia.org)
  • Common public health initiatives include promoting handwashing and breastfeeding, delivery of vaccinations, suicide prevention and distribution of condoms to control the spread of sexually transmitted diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • The focus of a public health intervention is to prevent and manage diseases, injuries and other health conditions through surveillance of cases and the promotion of healthy behaviors, communities and environments. (wikipedia.org)
  • The United States Public Health Service (PHS), led by the Surgeon General of the United States, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, headquartered in Atlanta, are involved with several international health activities, in addition to their national duties. (wikipedia.org)
  • Most governments recognize the importance of public health programs in reducing the incidence of disease, disability, and the effects of aging and other physical and mental health conditions, although public health generally receives significantly less government funding compared with medicine. (wikipedia.org)
  • Public health programs providing vaccinations have made strides in promoting health, including the eradication of smallpox, a disease that plagued humanity for thousands of years. (wikipedia.org)
  • cancers
  • But after two days of debate on those ills - namely, heart disease, cancers, diabetes and lung disease - he said he was optimistic that there was a carefully laid out approach that could lead the way in tackling the world's number one risk to the global economy and advance socio-economic development in the decades ahead. (un.org)
  • It has been estimated that if the primary risk factors were eliminated, 80% of the cases of heart disease, stroke and type 2 diabetes and 40% of cancers could be prevented. (wikipedia.org)
  • Stroke
  • By 2013, the leading causes of death were non-communicable diseases (predominantly stroke and ischemic heart disease). (wikipedia.org)
  • The World Heart Federation is committed to uniting its members and leads the global fight against heart disease and stroke, with a focus on low-and middle-income countries. (wikipedia.org)
  • The World Heart Federation is the world's only global body dedicated to leading the fight against heart disease and stroke via a united community of almost 200 member organizations that bring together the strength of medical societies and heart foundations, from more than 100 countries covering the regions of Asia-Pacific, Europe, East Mediterranean, the Americas and Africa. (wikipedia.org)
  • The World Heart Federation urges greater action from policy makers, healthcare professionals, patient organizations and individuals to work together to reduce the burden of heart disease and stroke, and ensure people all over the world can have longer and better lives. (wikipedia.org)
  • This led to the World Heart Federation recognising that achieving the 2025 targets would require a primary focus on cardiovascular disease, including heart disease and stroke, and that all of the targets have a direct impact on CVD. (wikipedia.org)
  • lung disease
  • This year we have also published evidence that engaging community volunteers at primary care level improves HIV diagnosis and anti-retroviral therapy uptake (ref), so we plan to use this experience in piloting service delivery improvements for chronic lung disease. (lstmed.ac.uk)
  • susceptibility
  • Optimising early growth and development may help to control and prevent the rising burden of non-communicable disease and break the cycle of intergenerational transmission of susceptibility. (utoronto.ca)
  • Other factors such as allergen, biomass or bacterial exposure may also lead to chronic disease dependent on the intensity, duration or timing of exposure and genetic susceptibility. (bmj.com)
  • asthma
  • 1 Childhood pneumonia or lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) remains the main cause of mortality, while asthma is the most common non-communicable disease. (bmj.com)
  • The network aims to improve asthma care globally, with a focus on low- and middle-income countries, through enhanced surveillance, research collaboration, capacity building and access to quality-assured essential medicines. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Global Asthma Network's mission is: To prevent asthma and improve asthma care globally with a focus on low- and middle-income countries. (wikipedia.org)
  • causes
  • In addition infertility from many other causes, birth control, unplanned pregnancy, unconsensual sexual activity and the struggle for access to abortion create other burdens for women. (wikipedia.org)
  • AIDS
  • The world faces three major challenges for achieving gender equality, in the form of three global epidemics: Non-communicable diseases, HIV/AIDS, and Gender-based violence. (ipsnews.net)
  • world's
  • Neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) are a group of 17 parasitic and bacterial infections that affect more than 1.4 billion of the world's poorest people. (sightsavers.org)
  • Cholesterol
  • The fourth pattern is one of degenerative diseases onset by a diet high in total fat, cholesterol, sugar, and other refined carbohydrates and low in polyunsaturated fatty acids and fiber. (wikipedia.org)
  • high
  • The prevalence of rheumatic heart disease was high in indigenous children and comparable to figures from developing countries, but was even worse in the Top End. (medindia.net)
  • Although the burden of LRTI is especially high in African children, there have been no similar cohort studies conducted in this setting. (bmj.com)
  • Rates of death from chronic disease in middle-aged people are higher in China than in some high-income countries. (wikipedia.org)
  • interventions
  • It presents data along the five strategic directions (strategic information, interventions, equity, financing and innovation) - key pillars of the GHSS to facilitate monitoring of progress in countries, regions and globally, and to measure the impact of interventions on reducing new infections and saving lives between 2015 and 2030. (aidsdatahub.org)
  • people
  • NTDs are diseases that primarily affect people living in poverty. (sightsavers.org)
  • Addressing the General Assembly's two-day summit on non-communicable diseases this afternoon as it drew to a close, Michael Bloomberg, Mayor of the City of New York, implored Governments worldwide to adopt the type of public policies and strategies that had enabled his administration to reduce deadly chronic illnesses and promote healthy lifestyles among the city's 8.4 million people. (un.org)
  • Each year 17.3 million people die of cardiovascular disease, 80% in the developing world. (wikipedia.org)
  • Common mental disorders include depression, which affects about 400 million, dementia which affects about 35 million, and schizophrenia, which affects about 21 million people globally. (wikipedia.org)
  • global
  • The report found that approximately one fourth of the global disease burden and more than one third of the burden among children was due to modifiable environmental factors. (wikipedia.org)
  • The GARP secretariat at the Center for Disease Dynamics, Economics & Policy (CDDEP), in Washington, DC and New Delhi, provides technical support to each working group, creates links within the GARP network and involves the working groups in global discussions and policy development. (wikipedia.org)
  • dominant
  • Inherited genetic errors from parents: Dominant genetic diseases, such as Huntingtons, require the inheritance of one erroneous gene to be expressed. (wikipedia.org)