• abnormal
  • The Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score, since its introduction in 1974, 1 has been frequently used as one of the most important predictors of outcome after head injury, 2 3 although other variables such as age, abnormal motor responses, CT findings, pupillary abnormalities, and episodes of hypoxia and hypotension, have been subsequently introduced to build more complex and accurate prognostic models. (bmj.com)
  • The Grady Coma Scale classes people on a scale of I to V along a scale of confusion, stupor, deep stupor, abnormal posturing, and coma. (wikipedia.org)
  • Apgar
  • The Apgar scale is determined by evaluating the newborn baby on five simple criteria on a scale from zero to two, then summing up the five values thus obtained. (wikipedia.org)
  • verbal
  • The scale is composed of three tests: eye, verbal and motor responses. (wikipedia.org)
  • Those in lighter coma may offer some response to a verbal or painful stimulus, to the point they may even seem wake, yet meet the criteria of coma because they do not respond to their environment by initiating voluntary actions. (medicinenet.com)
  • Medical
  • In some emergency medical services protocols, "Alert" can be subdivided into a scale of 1 to 4, in which 1, 2, 3 and 4 correspond to certain attributes, such as time, person, place, and event. (wikipedia.org)
  • tests
  • While the tests and scales may vary greatly from sport to sport, in the end, they effectively gain the same information regardless. (wikipedia.org)
  • lead
  • Trauma , bleeding, or swelling of the brain can affect blood delivery, various poisons can also directly injure the brain, and brain inflammation and infection can also alter mental status and lead to coma. (medicinenet.com)
  • issues
  • EDITOR-These authors highlight communication issues concerning the Glasgow coma scale and point out the greater ease of use of its original version. (bmj.com)
  • upon
  • SMS have been proposed as alternatives that would improve upon the Glasgow Coma Scale challenges of being confusing, unreliable, and unnecessarily complex. (wikipedia.org)