• viruses
  • Unfortunately, thanks to arrogance and misuse, resistant strains of bacteria and viruses have proliferated like fear mongers in an Ebola epidemic. (jonbarron.org)
  • Viruses evolve around antivirals in much the same way as bacteria evolve around antibiotics, but even more quickly since their DNA is much simpler -- more primitive, more malleable as it were. (jonbarron.org)
  • It was Antoine Béchamp (1816-1908), a contemporary of Pasteur, who discovered the true nature of germs, bacteria, viruses, etc., and that they were pleomorphic (capable of changing from one type of organism to another). (healingnaturallybybee.com)
  • Therefore, the intestine is home to a microbial community of 100 trillion beneficial and pathogenic bacteria, archaea, viruses, and eukaryotes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bacterial endospores are most resistant to disinfectants, but some viruses and bacteria also possess some tolerance. (wikipedia.org)
  • Foodborne illness (also foodborne disease and colloquially referred to as food poisoning) is any illness resulting from the food spoilage of contaminated food, pathogenic bacteria, viruses, or parasites that contaminate food, as well as toxins such as poisonous mushrooms and various species of beans that have not been boiled for at least 10 minutes. (wikipedia.org)
  • The make-up of the cytoskeleton is also related to the pathogenicity of intracellular bacteria and viruses, particularly in the processes related to evading the actions of the immune system. (wikipedia.org)
  • sputum
  • Methods: This is a retrospective study of patients with COPD hospitalised for AECOPD and whose bacteriological sputum was used to isolate the causative agent. (ersjournals.com)
  • One factor responsible for these differences is the reliance on sputum samples and the strictness of the criteria to discriminate between colonising or disease-causing bacteria. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bacterial pathogens were isolated from sputum, tracheal or bronchial aspirates and pleural effusion, and their susceptibility was tested using standard bacteriological techniques. (tmj.ro)
  • microbes
  • Rudolph Emmerich and Oscar Löw, two German physicians who were the first to make an effective medication from microbes, conducted experiments in the 1890s, roughly 30 years after Louis Pasteur showed that many diseases were caused by bacteria and nearly 40 years before the effective prescription of penicillin. (wikipedia.org)
  • The bacteria might outcompete other (pathogenic) soil microbes, e.g., by siderophores, giving a competitive advantage at scavenging for iron. (wikipedia.org)
  • The bacteria might produce compounds antagonistic to other soil microbes, such as phenazine-type antibiotics or hydrogen cyanide. (wikipedia.org)
  • Microbes trigger development of isolated lymphoid follicles in the small intestine, which are sites of mucosal immune response. (wikipedia.org)
  • organisms
  • Any population of organisms, bacteria included, naturally includes a handful of variants with unusual traits -- in this case, the ability to withstand a particular antibiotic's attack. (jonbarron.org)
  • No claim of antimicrobial effectiveness can be made, either express or implied, with regard to organisms (including bacteria in general) other than those identified above. (antimicrobialcopper.org)
  • Although the term bacteria traditionally included all prokaryotes, the scientific classification changed after the discovery in the 1990s that prokaryotes consist of two very different groups of organisms that evolved from an ancient common ancestor. (wikipedia.org)
  • Since the discovery of the germ theory of disease, scientists have been finding ways to harvest specific organisms. (wikipedia.org)
  • proteins
  • Erythromycin, tetracycline, and streptomycin, on the other hand, kill bacteria by attacking the structures inside the bacteria (ribosomes) that allow them to make proteins, thus also destroying the bacteria. (jonbarron.org)
  • When mice are raised in germ-free conditions, they lack circulating antibodies, and cannot produce mucus, antimicrobial proteins, or mucosal T-cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • strain
  • This bacterial strain is an environmental isolate capable of killing >90% of these mussels by intoxication (i.e., not infection), as a result of natural product(s) associated with their cell walls, and with dead Pf-145A cells killing the mussels equally as well as live cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1987, the ice-minus strain of Pseudomonas syringae became the first genetically modified organism to be released into the environment when a strawberry field and a potato field in California were sprayed with it. (wikipedia.org)
  • genes
  • Where it gets really frightening, though, is that bacteria swap genes like Facebook members swap friends -- which brings us to vancomycin, until a few years ago, the antibiotic of last resort. (jonbarron.org)
  • CRE can spread clonally from person to person or genes which encode carbapenemases can spread horizontally between isolates . (pearltrees.com)
  • Boyer and Cohen expressed other genes in bacteria. (wikipedia.org)
  • antibiotics
  • In industry, bacteria are important in sewage treatment and the breakdown of oil spills, the production of cheese and yogurt through fermentation, and the recovery of gold, palladium, copper and other metals in the mining sector, as well as in biotechnology, and the manufacture of antibiotics and other chemicals. (wikipedia.org)
  • Each year in the United States, at least 2 million people become infected with bacteria that are resistant to antibiotics and at least 23,000 people die as a result. (wikipedia.org)
  • susceptible
  • Sterile soil-less cultures are the most susceptible, while increasing soil content inhibits disease progression due to bacteria present in the soil. (wikipedia.org)
  • pathogens
  • Bacteria have been the most commonly isolated pathogens, although viral and fungal pathogens are potentially found in immunocompromised hosts (patients on chronic immunosuppressed medications, solid organ and bone marrow transplant recipients). (wikipedia.org)
  • species
  • Learn how to tell whether Pasteurella species of bacteria are at the root of your rabbit's sneezes and differentiate between various causes of rabbit sneezing. (raising-rabbits.com)
  • Most bacteria have not been characterised, and only about half of the bacterial phyla have species that can be grown in the laboratory. (wikipedia.org)
  • diagnosis
  • There's a reason why our information on Snuffles and the Pasteurella bacteria seems so apocalyptic - a diagnosis of Pasteurellosis is likely the beginning of the end if that diagnosis is accurate. (raising-rabbits.com)
  • Breath test for microbial diagnosis on patients has been used in a clinical setting for bacteria, including Helicobacter pylori. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mass spectrometry is a clinical application involving diagnosis of bacteria-specific molecules. (wikipedia.org)
  • disease
  • They proved that the germs that caused one disease may be the cure for another. (wikipedia.org)
  • In this study, we correlated the parameters of severity of the disease with isolated bacteria. (ersjournals.com)
  • If you look back into the history of the medical profession and the various ideas regarding the cause of disease that were held by leading physicians before Pasteur first promulgated his notorious "germ theory", you will find convincing evidence that Pasteur discovered nothing, and that he deliberately appropriated, falsified and perverted another man's work. (healingnaturallybybee.com)
  • However, since the "Germ Theory of Disease" is so profitable, the medical world has written off his final statements as the madness of a dying man. (healingnaturallybybee.com)
  • The germ which causes a disease must be found in every case of the disease under the conditions which could explain the disease. (healingnaturallybybee.com)
  • He was not able to find the germ in all cases of a disease and this is where his research became fraudulent. (healingnaturallybybee.com)
  • And finally, when Pasteur passed a germ from one animal to another to cause the disease, he did not pass the germ alone, but took some blood with it. (healingnaturallybybee.com)
  • Professor Antoine Béchamp, a French biologist (1816 - 1908), who was Pasteur's contemporary (lived at the same time and they knew each other), developed and demonstrated a pleomorphic (many forms - see a more complete description below) theory - essentially that bacteria change form and are not the cause of, but the result of, disease, arising from tissues rather than from a germ of constant form. (healingnaturallybybee.com)
  • The "golden era" of medical-hygiene studies of disease came to fruition as the biological, cell-based germ theory of fermentation, contagion, putrefaction and change replaced chemical-based notions of continuing "spontaneous humoral generation. (victorianweb.org)
  • Thus, Pasteur dealt the death blow to the theory of spontaneous generation and supported the germ theory of disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • inhibits
  • The approved claims language is that the surface "inhibits" - not "prevents" - the buildup and growth of bacteria* within two hours of exposure between routine cleaning and sanitizing steps. (antimicrobialcopper.org)
  • compounds
  • Each of these interactors produce specialized metabolites such as Abyssomycine C, a derivate of the para-aminobenzoic and folic acid biosynthesis (actinomyces), the polyketide Pederin, isolated from the intestine of the beetle Paederus spp, or numerous secondary allelopathic plant compounds that act as chemical defense and provide unique bio-fertilizer and pharmaceutical products. (frontiersin.org)
  • Once isolated, a few of these biologically significant compounds are of biotechnological or bio-medicinal interest. (frontiersin.org)
  • In the biological communities surrounding hydrothermal vents and cold seeps, extremophile bacteria provide the nutrients needed to sustain life by converting dissolved compounds, such as hydrogen sulphide and methane, to energy. (wikipedia.org)
  • multiply
  • These renegade variants, now the only bacteria left, are now free to multiply without constraint, increasing their numbers a million fold in a single day, instantly becoming the new dominant variant. (jonbarron.org)
  • increasingly
  • Under a sustained chemical attack, the surviving bacteria in successive generations are increasingly resistant to the chemical used, and ultimately the chemical is rendered ineffective. (wikipedia.org)
  • mold
  • In the 1940s and early 1950s, further studies showed inactivation of diverse bacteria, influenza virus, and Penicillium chrysogenum (previously P. notatum) mold fungus using various glycols, principally propylene glycol and triethylene glycol. (wikipedia.org)
  • harmless
  • The vast majority of the bacteria in the body are rendered harmless by the protective effects of the immune system, though many are beneficial particularly in the gut flora. (wikipedia.org)
  • means
  • The word Pseudomonas means false unit, being derived from the Greek words pseudo (Greek: ψευδο - false) and monas (Latin: monas, from Greek: μονάς/μονάδα - a single unit). (wikipedia.org)
  • found
  • To be specific, certain P. fluorescens isolates produce the secondary metabolite 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (2,4-DAPG), the compound found to be responsible for antiphytopathogenic and biocontrol properties in these strains. (wikipedia.org)
  • theory
  • He also left a legacy of new, eponymous micro-anatomical structures (Purkinje cells in the brain, Purkinje fibres in the heart), all supportive of the newly recognised cell/germ theory. (victorianweb.org)
  • known
  • It was suggested that bacteria thrive in the Mariana Trench, which with a depth of up to 11 kilometres is the deepest known part of the oceans. (wikipedia.org)
  • word
  • The word bacteria is the plural of the New Latin bacterium, which is the latinisation of the Greek βακτήριον (bakterion), the diminutive of βακτηρία (bakteria), meaning "staff, cane", because the first ones to be discovered were rod-shaped. (wikipedia.org)
  • Stages
  • Bacteria are vital in many stages of the nutrient cycle by recycling nutrients such as the fixation of nitrogen from the atmosphere. (wikipedia.org)
  • plants
  • Bacteria also live in symbiotic and parasitic relationships with plants and animals. (wikipedia.org)
  • There are approximately 5×1030 bacteria on Earth, forming a biomass which exceeds that of all plants and animals. (wikipedia.org)
  • Once regarded as plants constituting the class Schizomycetes, bacteria are now classified as prokaryotes. (wikipedia.org)
  • studies
  • However, gene sequences can be used to reconstruct the bacterial phylogeny, and these studies indicate that bacteria diverged first from the archaeal/eukaryotic lineage. (wikipedia.org)