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  • bacteria
  • Milk is tested following pasteurization to confirm that bacteria have been killed to an acceptable level. (wikipedia.org)
  • Pasteurization kills pathogenic bacteria which occasionally may be present in milk, including those causing tuberculosis (Mycobacterium bovis), listeriosis (Listeria monocytogenes), Q fever (Coxiella burnetii), brucellosis (Brucella), campylobacteriosis (Campylobacter), salmonellosis (Salmonella), and several other foodborne illnesses (e.g. (wikipedia.org)
  • Pasteurization may not kill some resistant bacteria, which can eventually cause souring and spoilage of fresh milk. (wikipedia.org)
  • During pasteurization, however, these lactic acid bacteria are mostly destroyed. (wikipedia.org)
  • Pasteurization is the process by which milk is flash heated to a temperature that destroys all bacteria in it, including its content of beneficial lactic bacteria which contribute to our intestinal immunity. (nutritiapedia.org)
  • nonpathogenic) axenic autoecious bacilliform bacterial streaming bactericide bacteriocin bacteriophage bacterium (pl. bacteria) bactericide basal knob (syn. (wikipedia.org)
  • It was Antoine Béchamp (1816-1908), a contemporary of Pasteur, who discovered the true nature of germs, bacteria, viruses, etc., and that they were pleomorphic (capable of changing from one type of organism to another). (healingnaturallybybee.com)
  • Professor Antoine Béchamp, a French biologist (1816 - 1908), who was Pasteur's contemporary (lived at the same time and they knew each other), developed and demonstrated a pleomorphic (many forms - see a more complete description below) theory - essentially that bacteria change form and are not the cause of, but the result of, disease, arising from tissues rather than from a germ of constant form. (healingnaturallybybee.com)
  • Koch's
  • Koch's bacteriologists regarded a bacterial species' properties as unalterable, a position shown false by Pasteur's modification of virulence to develop vaccine. (wikipedia.org)
  • Pasteur applied the discovery to develop chicken cholera vaccine, introduced in a public experiment, an empirical challenge to the stance of Koch's bacteriologists that bacterial traits were unalterable. (wikipedia.org)
  • Fungi
  • If you don't understand your prokaryotes out of your protozoa, or studying approximately fungi places you in a funk, glance no further-- Microbiology Demystified , moment variation is your treatment for studying this topic's basic techniques and theories at your personal pace. (noscience.se)
  • motility
  • Peering into his microscopes, Leeuwenhoek realized that che-mi-cals such as pepperand wine-vinegar caused bacterial death, as evinced by their loss of motility. (asmblog.org)
  • Vaccines
  • In 1995, which was "ironically" proclaimed "The Year of Pasteur," Geison's article was published in the New York Times proclaiming that Pasteur had lied about his research on vaccines and germs and that most of his ideas had been plagiarized from his contemporaries. (healingnaturallybybee.com)
  • experiments
  • Although Pasteur was not the first to propose the germ theory, his experiments indicated its correctness and convinced most of Europe that it was true. (wikipedia.org)
  • process
  • Raw milk advocates, such as the Weston A. Price Foundation, say that raw milk can be produced hygienically, and that it has health benefits that are destroyed in the pasteurization process. (wikipedia.org)
  • He is best known to the general public for his invention of the technique of treating milk and wine to stop bacterial contamination, a process now called pasteurization. (wikipedia.org)
  • D = Charles Robert Darwin (1809 -1882): known for his contributions to evolutionary theory, resulted from a process that he called natural selection , in which the struggle for existence has a similar effect to the artificial selection involved in selective breeding. (cloudsfactory.net)
  • Pasteurization is a process by which harmful microbes in perishable food products are destroyed using heat, without destroying the food. (healingnaturallybybee.com)
  • microscopic
  • My aim in writing this article is to encourage man to choose his daily food from the standpoint of man as a part of nature-not from the analytical microscopic theory based on dead life in a test tube. (scribd.com)
  • remarkable
  • After a remarkable analysis of bacterial DNA from 1,000-year-old mummies, scientists have proposed a new hypothesis for how tuberculosis arose and spread around the world. (slashdot.org)
  • known
  • H = Peter Higgs (1929 - Still living): best known for his 1960s proposal of broken symmetry in electroweak theory, explaining the origin of mass of elementary particles in general and of the W and Z bosons in particular. (cloudsfactory.net)
  • scientists
  • Germ theory's applications were embedded in the heightening quest by France, Germany, Britain, and Italy to colonize Africa and Asia with the aid of tropical medicine, a new variant of colonial medicine, while medical scientists in respective nations vied to lead advances. (wikipedia.org)
  • discovery
  • Even though he was not the first one to propose this, he is credited with the discovery because he had solid research and evidence to back his theory. (carehospitals.com)
  • modern medicine
  • While modern medicine continues to grow in complexity , through experimental research, advanced technologies and new pharmaceutical drugs, it is clear to see that its roots remain bound to a simple theory that originated more than one century ago. (infobarrel.com)
  • food
  • During his studies into the fermentation of beer and wine, he achieved success in developing the technique of pasteurization (or heat treatment) as a way to preserve food products that would otherwise spoil, ie milk. (infobarrel.com)
  • made
  • They circumvented pu-tre-fac-tion by dehydrating the body and using chemicals such as natron (a salt) that effectively sterilizes the body and prevents bacterial decomposition (similar to how beef jerky is made). (asmblog.org)