• genomic
  • The field of human ancient DNA (aDNA) has moved from mitochondrial sequencing that suffered from contamination and provided limited biological insights, to become a fully genomic discipline that is changing our conception of human history. (royalsocietypublishing.org)
  • Evolution is the central theme in biology, but genomic tools allow new insights into the mechanisms and patterns of evolutionary change. (csh-asia.org)
  • Particular emphases will include the application of genomic approaches to study population diversity, new findings about adaptation and speciation, and our nascent understanding of the role of genetic interactions in the evolutionary process. (csh-asia.org)
  • 2012. Genomic monkey business-estimates of nearly identical human-chimp DNA similarity re-evaluated using omitted data . (icr.org)
  • Genomic instability of the sex-determining locus in Atlantic salmon ( Salmo salar ) Lubieniecki et al. (sexchrlab.org)
  • 1998
  • A parallel project was conducted outside government by the Celera Corporation, or Celera Genomics, which was formally launched in 1998. (wikipedia.org)
  • pathogen
  • lycopersici 4287, human/plant pathogen (2010) Gibberella moniliformis 7600, plant pathogen (2010) Gibberella zeae PH-1, plant pathogen (2008) Gaeumannomyces graminis tritici R3-111a-1 (2010, unpubl. (wikipedia.org)
  • tritici, plant pathogen (2011) Puccinia triticina 1-1 BBBD Race 1, pathogen of wheat() Rhodotorula graminis strain WP1, plant symbiont (2010) Sporobolomyces roseus, associated with plants () Cryptococcus (Filobasidiella) neoformans JEC21, human pathogen (2005, other strains unpubl. (wikipedia.org)
  • meiosis
  • Normal egg cells form after meiosis and are haploid, with half as many chromosomes as their mother's body cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Many other cases of obligate parthenogenesis (or gynogenesis) are found among polyploids and hybrids where the chromosomes cannot pair for meiosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Diploidy might be restored by the doubling of the chromosomes without cell division before meiosis begins or after meiosis is completed. (wikipedia.org)
  • The chromosomes may not separate at one of the two anaphases (called restitutional meiosis), or the nuclei produced may fuse or one of the polar bodies may fuse with the egg cell at some stage during its maturation. (wikipedia.org)
  • species
  • The study of genomics is made possible by the creation of genome assemblies: strings of sequences that represent the DNA content of a species, or an individual within a species. (washington.edu)
  • In many species there is a heterogametic sex (e.g. (biologged.com)
  • diploid
  • Haploid individuals, however, are usually non-viable, and parthenogenetic offspring usually have the diploid chromosome number. (wikipedia.org)
  • Depending on the mechanism involved in restoring the diploid number of chromosomes, parthenogenetic offspring may have anywhere between all and half of the mother's alleles. (wikipedia.org)
  • populations
  • Alleles occur at different frequencies in different human populations, with populations that are more geographically and ancestrally remote tending to differ more, a phenomenon known as isolation-by-distance. (wikipedia.org)
  • genotype
  • This is because in asexual reproduction a successful genotype can spread quickly without being modified by sex or wasting resources on male offspring who won't give birth. (wikipedia.org)
  • processes
  • The convergence between this theme and NSFC's own "Major Research Projects" (释夦砘穻讠刓) , entitled"Multigenic interactions driving micro-evolutionary processes" (徳迖匝迀稌皈夛基囤佗甯朶刴3基释 (csh-asia.org)
  • telomeres
  • No interstitial telomeres on autosomes but remarkable amplification of telomeric repeats on the W sex chromosome in the sand lizard ( Lacerta agilis ) Matsubara et al. (sexchrlab.org)
  • describes
  • This dissertation describes the methods and algorithms developed to improve human genetic analysis for both genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and pedigree-based analyses. (washington.edu)
  • mutations
  • This mathematical model illustrates how evolutionary fitness depends on the independence of phenotypic variation from random changes (that is, mutations). (wikipedia.org)
  • New findings show that each human has on average 60 new mutations compared to their parents. (wikipedia.org)