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  • crops
  • But this enormous impact is due to only a few dozen species, and dipteran damage to forests, crops and stored products is similarly due to mere dozens of different fly genera. (fireflybooks.com)
  • It is a method of farming system which primarily aimed at cultivating the land and raising crops in such a way, as to keep the soil alive and in good health by use of organic wastes (crop, animal and farm wastes, aquatic wastes) and other biological materials along with beneficial microbes (biofertilizers) to release nutrients to crops for increased sustainable production in an eco friendly pollution free environment. (niir.org)
  • This is beneficial to gardens, as aphids destroy crops, and hoverfly maggots are often used in biological control. (wikipedia.org)
  • Application of Bt toxins towards insect pest management has involved both spray formulations of B. thuringiensis crystals/spores and crops genetically engineered to express Bt toxin genes. (mdpi.com)
  • Despite this, they may be beneficial because they consume common pest insects on crops. (wikipedia.org)
  • humans
  • Although it is common throughout Florida and aggressively attacks its insect prey, it very seldom bites humans. (ufl.edu)
  • Many entomologists are employed in the study of insects that are directly beneficial or harmful to humans. (newworldencyclopedia.org)
  • While digesting the vast information produced by the project (about 250 million base pairs per species, and tens of thousands of gene variants and proteins), consortium scientists found that the majority of Nasonia 's genes are shared with humans and other animals, while one of every five genes belong to insects alone, and roughly two of every 100 genes are singularly shared between wasps and their close cousins, the honeybee. (iu.edu)
  • These small insects can bite humans, with surprising pain for such a small insect. (wikipedia.org)
  • flies
  • The 20 pages of profusely illustrated keys linked to the unprecedented photographic coverage of the world's fly families and subfamilies enable the reader to identify most flies quickly and accurately, and to readily access information about each family as well as hundreds of distinctive genera and species. (fireflybooks.com)
  • This is perhaps in part because of the natural attraction of insect enthusiasts to shining beetles and colorful moths, and perhaps in part because so many groups of flies are relatively small and soft-bodied, and thus more difficult to preserve and study. (fireflybooks.com)
  • Some obligate symbionts, such as Buchnera in aphids and Wigglesworthia in tsetse flies, are of a mutualistic nature and contribute to the fitness of their hosts ( 2 , 4 , 60 ), while other facultative symbionts, such as Wolbachia in various insects, are often parasitic and tend to cause negative effects on their hosts ( 12 , 68 ). (asm.org)
  • Hoverflies, sometimes called flower flies, or syrphid flies, make up the insect family Syrphidae. (wikipedia.org)
  • The vast majority of leaf-mining insects are moths (Lepidoptera), sawflies (Symphyta, a type of wasp) and flies (Diptera), though some beetles also exhibit this behavior. (wikipedia.org)
  • Agromyzidae (Leaf miner flies) Pegomya hyoscyami (Spinach / beet leaf miner) Douglasiidae (including Tinagma, the largest genus of Douglasiidae) Gracillariidae Liriomyza sativae (Vegetable leaf miner) Nepticulidae Horse-chestnut leaf miner (Cameraria ohridella) Tenthredinidae (some species) Tischerioidea (Trumpet leaf-miner moths) Folivore Paper linking Quercus species and the leaf miner Walker, Matt (19 June 2009). (wikipedia.org)
  • The leaf and stem mines of British flies and other insects. (wikipedia.org)
  • They are, in fact, one of the better predators of blow flies, thus are beneficial agents of biological control. (wikipedia.org)
  • larva
  • The heaviest beetle, indeed the heaviest insect stage, is the larva of the goliath beetle, Goliathus goliatus, which can attain a mass of at least 115 g (4.1 oz) and a length of 11.5 cm (4.5 in). (wikipedia.org)
  • A leaf miner is the larva of an insect that lives in and eats the leaf tissue of plants. (wikipedia.org)
  • midgut
  • The broad-headed bug Riptortus clavatus (Heteroptera: Alydidae) possesses a number of crypts at a posterior midgut region, which house a dense population of a bacterial symbiont belonging to the genus Burkholderia . (asm.org)
  • The Burkholderia symbiont was present in the soil of the insect habitat, and a culture strain of the symbiont was successfully isolated from the insect midgut. (asm.org)
  • The sites of protease toxic activity range from the insect midgut to the hemocoel (body cavity) to the cuticle. (mdpi.com)
  • Cry proteins bind to receptors and insert into the membranes of insect midgut epithelial cells, forming pores and causing cellular lysis and fatal damage to the midgut epithelium [ 3 ]. (mdpi.com)
  • beetles
  • The following is a guide to common ground beetles in Maine, and to the benefits they provide wild blueberry farmers and other agricultural producers in terms of natural pest control. (umaine.edu)
  • These beetles typically prefer vegetated habitats that may support high insect pest prey densities, provide a favorable microclimate, and afford protection from the ground beetles' predators, which are larger ground beetles, mice, birds, and other large predators. (umaine.edu)
  • The general anatomy of a beetle is quite uniform and typical of insects, although there are several examples of novelty, such as adaptations in water beetles which trap air bubbles under the elytra for use while diving. (wikipedia.org)
  • Many beetles are aposematic, with bright colours and patterns warning of their toxicity, while others are harmless Batesian mimics of such insects. (wikipedia.org)
  • Beetles are prominent in human culture, from the sacred scarabs of ancient Egypt to beetlewing art and use as pets or fighting insects for entertainment and gambling. (wikipedia.org)
  • Beetles are by far the largest order of insects: the roughly 400,000 species make up about 40% of all insect species so far described, and about 25% of all animals. (wikipedia.org)
  • Diptera
  • This is one of the least studied of the large Diptera families, probably due to the small size of these insects and the difficulty in specific identification. (wikipedia.org)
  • crustaceans
  • There are likely 5 to 10 million species of insects and crustaceans on the globe that altogether show a staggering variety of methods to survive and reproduce. (iu.edu)
  • Insects may be found in nearly all environments, although only a small number of species reside in the oceans, a habitat dominated by another arthropod group, crustaceans. (wikipedia.org)
  • belong
  • The following genera belong to this family: Acompocoris Alofa Amphiareus Anthocoris Calliodis Cardiastethus Coccivora Dufouriellus Elatophilus Lasiochilus Lyctocoris Macrothacheliella Melanocoris Nidicola Orius Paratriphleps Pehuencoris Physopleurella Plochiocoris Scoloposcelis Solenonotus Temnostethus Tetraphleps Xylocoris Lattin, J.D. (1999). (wikipedia.org)
  • wasps
  • The scientists recognized some of these genes as similar to those found in other venom-producing insects, but about half of the 79 candidate venom genes seemed unique to the wasps. (iu.edu)
  • A small group of eusocial crabronid wasps, of the genus Microstigmus (the only eusocial wasps outside the family Vespidae), also constructs nests out of chewed plant fibers, though the nest consistency is quite different from those of true paper wasps, due to the absence of wood fibers, and the use of silk to bind the fibers. (wikipedia.org)
  • North America
  • Sceliphron caementarium of North America Sceliphron caementarium Sceliphron caementarium Sceliphron curvatum, in Platamon, Greece Sceliphron spirifex of Africa and Europe Sceliphron destillatorius Sceliphron nest Sceliphron destillatorium Short discussion on genus Sceliphron. (wikipedia.org)
  • phylum
  • Insects or Insecta (from Latin insectum, a calque of Greek ἔντομον [éntomon], "cut into sections") are by far the largest group of hexapod invertebrates within the arthropod phylum. (wikipedia.org)
  • subfamily
  • A member of the genus Solenopsis in the subfamily Myrmicinae, it was described by Swiss entomologist Felix Santschi as a variant in 1916. (wikipedia.org)
  • Crossopriza lyoni are classified under the genus Crossopriza and the subfamily Holocneminae. (wikipedia.org)
  • entomology
  • Stephen A. Marshall is a professor of entomology at the University of Guelph, where he developed a major insect collection and carries out research on insect systematics and biodiversity. (fireflybooks.com)
  • Entomology is the scientific study of insects . (newworldencyclopedia.org)
  • Given these factors and the sheer numbers of insects-combined with a human nature endowed with curiosity and creativity and an often viewed role as stewards of nature-it is not surprising that entomology is an important specialty within biology . (newworldencyclopedia.org)
  • Forensic entomology specializes in the study of insect ecology for use in the legal system, as knowledge of insect behavior can yield useful information about crimes. (newworldencyclopedia.org)
  • Pliny the Elder introduced the Latin designation as a loan-translation of the Greek word ἔντομος (éntomos) or "insect" (as in entomology), which was Aristotle's term for this class of life, also in reference to their "notched" bodies. (wikipedia.org)
  • With the transition of entomology research to the University of California Citrus Experiment Station in 1923, Smith's research division was refashioned as the Division of Beneficial Insect Investigations and Smith was appointed an associate professor at UCR where he remained until his retirement in 1951. (wikipedia.org)
  • adults
  • Insects that undergo three-stage metamorphosis lack a pupal stage and adults develop through a series of nymphal stages. (wikipedia.org)
  • roles
  • In some of them, experimental elimination of the symbiont was reported to cause retarded growth and nymphal mortality, suggesting that the symbionts play important biological roles for the host insects ( 1 , 14 , 35 , 44 , 45 , 62 , 79 ). (asm.org)
  • Some of these insecticidal proteases evolved as venom components, herbivore resistance factors, or microbial pathogenicity factors, while other proteases play roles in insect development or digestion, but exert an insecticidal effect when over-expressed from genetically engineered plants or microbial pathogens. (mdpi.com)
  • beetle
  • The smallest recorded beetle and the smallest free-living insect (as of 2015), is the featherwing beetle Scydosella musawasensis which may measure as little as 325 µm in length. (wikipedia.org)
  • Apis
  • Due to its notoriety and importance, the ant has become one of the most studied insects on the planet, even rivalling the western honey bee (Apis mellifera). (wikipedia.org)
  • toxicity
  • Among the compounds identified during the course of this research are proteins from microbes, predators, and plants that have toxicity that is specific to insects. (mdpi.com)
  • evolutionary
  • We suggest that the stinkbug- Burkholderia relationship may be regarded as an insect analogue of the well-known symbioses between plants and soil-associated microbes, such as legume- Rhizobium and alder- Frankia relationships, and we discuss the evolutionary relevance of the mutualistic but promiscuous insect-microbe association. (asm.org)
  • genetic
  • This split character in the insects' genetic identities can actually make studying them easier. (iu.edu)
  • ladybird
  • Some insects such as the ladybird or tiger moth contain bitter-tasting chemicals, while the skunk produces a noxious odour, and the poison glands of the poison dart frog, the sting of a velvet ant or neurotoxin in a black widow spider make them dangerous or painful to attack. (wikipedia.org)
  • adult
  • Four characteristics definitively separate adult tsetse from other kinds of flies: Like all other insects, tsetse flies have an adult body comprising three visibly distinct parts: the head, the thorax and the abdomen. (wikipedia.org)
  • small
  • The green-head ant is diurnal, active throughout the day, preying on arthropods and small insects or collecting sweet substances such as honeydew from sap-sucking insects. (wikipedia.org)
  • form
  • The latter were previously placed in the form genus Neotyphodium but included in Epichloë after molecular phylogenetics had shown asexual and sexual species to be intermingled in a single clade. (wikipedia.org)
  • A number of species continued to be described in both genera until Leuchtmann and colleagues (2014) included most of the form genus Neotyphodium in Epichloë. (wikipedia.org)
  • almost
  • Grazing provided some control by stock trampling but this has almost ceased since the 2007 foot-and-mouth disease outbreak reduced commercial livestock production. (wikipedia.org)
  • suggest
  • Recent observational data of Patellapis s. l. suggest the genus practices communal nesting, with as many as eight females sharing a nest. (wikipedia.org)
  • the findings suggest that rather than closing their stomata to control water loss, it is controlled by the leaf area instead. (wikipedia.org)
  • known
  • The Vespidae include the extinct genus Palaeovespa, seven species of which are known from the Eocene rocks of the Florissant fossil beds of Colorado and from fossilised Baltic amber in Europe. (wikipedia.org)
  • He included three species under the genus Lemur: Lemur tardigradus (the red slender loris, now known as Loris tardigradus), Lemur catta (the ring-tailed lemur), and Lemur volans (the Philippine colugo, now known as Cynocephalus volans). (wikipedia.org)
  • Further
  • Further, look for dark spots of insect waste where bedbugs might crawl into hiding places on furniture, walls, and floors. (nobedbugs.net)
  • The monotypic genus Hollrungia seems to be inseparable from Passiflora , but further study is needed. (infogalactic.com)