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  • physiological
  • The purpose of this study was to determine whether intravenous administration of CRH affects human gastrointestinal motility and whether CRH discriminates physiological responses in normal control subjects from those in IBS patients. (bmj.com)
  • However, this is incorrect, as it was discovered that these effects are achieved only with higher-than-normal physiological level, and that these results naturally occur in the body through a similar hormone, secretin. (wikipedia.org)
  • irritable
  • Impaired (i.e., slowed) motility of the gastrointestinal system, which can be involved in gastroesophageal reflux disease, gastroparesis (e.g., diabetic and postsurgical), irritable bowel syndrome and constipation, is one of the largest health care burdens of industrialized nations. (patentsencyclopedia.com)
  • Despite stress being considered a key factor in the pathophysiology of the functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorder irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), there is a paucity of information regarding the ability of IBS patients to respond to acute experimental stress. (cambridge.org)
  • vagal
  • The vagal nerve and gut hormones CCK and GLP-1 play important roles in the control of food intake. (wur.nl)
  • neurons
  • Ghrelin and synthetic ghrelin mimetics (growth hormone secretagogues) increase body weight and fat mass by triggering receptors in the arcuate nucleus that include the orexigenic neuropeptide Y (NPY) and agouti-related protein (AgRP) neurons. (wikipedia.org)
  • The primary function of EC cells is to synthesise and secrete serotonin for modulation of gastrointestinal neurons. (wikipedia.org)
  • insulin
  • Octreotide (trade name Sandostatin, among others) is an octapeptide that mimics natural somatostatin pharmacologically, though it is a more potent inhibitor of growth hormone, glucagon, and insulin than the natural hormone. (wikipedia.org)
  • The most frequent adverse effects (more than 10% of patients) are headache, hypothyroidism, cardiac conduction changes, gastrointestinal reactions (including cramps, nausea/vomiting and diarrhoea or constipation), gallstones, reduction of insulin release, hyperglycemia or hypoglycemia, and (usually transient) injection site reactions. (wikipedia.org)
  • roles
  • Gut hormones also have central mediating roles in GI motility, appetite and body energy metabolism via the brain-gut axis, and thus also have pivotal involvement in FGIDs whose characteristic symptoms are closely associated with food intake. (jnmjournal.org)
  • It is more interesting to find the roles of hormones in HCC molecular mechanisms. (omicsonline.org)
  • growth
  • The method comprises administering to a subject in need thereof a therapeutically effective amount of a growth hormone secretagogue compound or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt, hydrate or solvate thereof. (patentsencyclopedia.com)
  • Octreotide can also be used in the treatment of Acromegaly, a disorder of excessive growth hormone (GH). (wikipedia.org)
  • Ulimorelin (INN, USAN) (developmental code name TZP-101) is a drug with a modified cyclic peptide structure which acts as a selective agonist of the ghrelin/growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR). (wikipedia.org)
  • Unlike many related drugs, ulimorelin is peripherally selective and has little or no effect on growth hormone (GH) release, instead having a specific laxative effect. (wikipedia.org)
  • function
  • How to use the analysis of gut hormones to examine the liver function or detect the HCC is important. (omicsonline.org)
  • This review aims to highlight the abnormalities in gastrointestinal function that are commonly observed in patients with chronic liver disease and their impact on the overall outcomes in these patients ( Figure 1 ). (omicsonline.org)
  • This Phase 2 trial is designed to evaluate the effects of RM-131 on symptoms and lower gastrointestinal (GI) function in patients with significant chronic constipation. (biospace.com)
  • Through these cross connections, the gut can provide sensory information to the CNS, and the CNS can affect gastrointestinal function. (wikipedia.org)
  • More generally, the orexinergic neural projections of the lateral hypothalamus are involved in thermoregulation, regulating gastrointestinal motility and gastrointestinal function by way of the dorsal nucleus of the vagus nerve, reducing pain and nociception through several output structures (e.g., periaqueductal gray matter), modulating the rewarding property of stimuli through the ventral tegmental area projections and other outputs in the reward system, regulating energy homeostasis and neuroendocrine functions (e.g. (wikipedia.org)
  • symptoms
  • Patients with cirrhosis frequently experience gastrointestinal symptoms [ 1 , 2 ]. (omicsonline.org)
  • The test does not directly detect colon cancer but is often used in clinical screening for that disease, but it can also be used to look for active occult blood loss in anemia or when there are gastrointestinal symptoms. (wikipedia.org)
  • reduce
  • The extent to which screening procedures reduce the incidence of gastrointestinal cancer or mortality depends on the rate of precancerous and cancerous disease in that population. (wikipedia.org)
  • axis
  • The present review provides a broad outline of interactions between the gut microbiota and gut hormone axis in relation to GI motility in the pathophysiology of FGIDs. (jnmjournal.org)
  • Galanin is an important neuromodulator present in the brain, gastrointestinal system, and hypothalamopituitary axis. (wikipedia.org)