• alcohol
  • Abusing alcohol can give rise to gastritis. (dreddyclinic.com)
  • Different factors contribute to gastritis, including bacterial infections, alcohol use, over-the-counter pain relievers, underlying reflux disease or stress. (livestrong.com)
  • Gastritis has many underlying causes, from infection with the bacterium H. pylori, bile reflux, or excessive consumption of alcohol or certain foods or drugs like aspirin. (dailystrength.org)
  • According to "The New York Times Health Guide," gastritis may also be caused by consuming excessive amounts of alcohol and the long-term use of certain medications, including naproxen and ibuprofen. (livestrong.com)
  • Gaby recommends that you avoid alcohol consumption if you have gastritis. (livestrong.com)
  • Gastritis can be diagnosed by the patient's symptoms and history (for example, NSAID and/or alcohol consumption), or by breath, blood, stool , immunological, and biopsy tests to detect H. pylori and other tests such as endoscopy or radiologic studies demonstrate mucosal changes. (medicinenet.com)
  • Also, note that alcohol consumption does not cause chronic gastritis. (wikipedia.org)
  • small intestine
  • Gastritis can occur when this acidic substance abnormally flows backwards from the small intestine into the stomach and esophagus--a condition known as bile reflux. (livestrong.com)
  • In some cases, bile, normally used to aid digestion in the small intestine, will enter through the pyloric valve of the stomach if it has been removed during surgery or does not work properly, also leading to gastritis. (wikipedia.org)
  • stool
  • Another stool specimen can check for blood in your stool which may be a sign of gastritis if there has been bleeding. (rochester.edu)