• pylori
  • Gastritis can be diagnosed by the patient's symptoms and history (for example, NSAID and/or alcohol consumption), or by breath, blood, stool , immunological, and biopsy tests to detect H. pylori and other tests such as endoscopy or radiologic studies demonstrate mucosal changes. (medicinenet.com)
  • Yoshida et al concluded that H pylori infection potentiates aspirin induced gastric mucosal injury by mechanisms that include accumulation of activated neutrophils. (bmj.com)
  • This is one of the first experimental studies showing convincingly that aspirin induced gastric injury is aggravated by H pylori infection. (bmj.com)
  • However, the study should be completed by proving that H pylori eradication will reverse the severity of aspirin induced gastric injury to levels found in uninfected gerbils. (bmj.com)
  • About three weeks after H pylori inoculation, gerbils exhibit typical gastritis with neutrophil and mononuclear cell infiltration in the lamina propria. (bmj.com)
  • 5- 8 H pylori gastritis seems to increase the likelihood of developing dyspeptic symptoms in patients on NSAID therapy. (bmj.com)
  • However, H. pylori possibly plays a role only in the first stage that leads to common chronic inflammation, but not in further stages leading to carcinogenesis. (wikipedia.org)
  • erosions
  • The ulcerations may be superficial and confined to the mucosa, in which case they are more appropriately called erosions, or they may penetrate deeper into the submucosa. (wikipedia.org)
  • normal gastric
  • Spheroids can be differentiated to organoids which recapitulate many facets of the normal gastric architecture and physiology, and can also be transferred to planar cultures. (bmj.com)
  • Troxipide inhibits various proinflammatory mediators present at different stages of the microcirculatory system, thereby restoring the normal gastric mucosa. (wikipedia.org)
  • glands
  • We have established a quasi-immortal tissue culture model derived from normal, primary human gastric glands, which can be expanded in vitro in the form of three dimensional gastric spheroids. (bmj.com)
  • These are the ducts of the gastric glands, and at the bottom of each may be seen one or more minute orifices, the openings of the gland tubes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Gastric glands are simple or branched tubular glands that emerge on the deeper part of the gastric foveola, inside the gastric areas and outlined by the folds of the mucosa. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1881 Klebs notes the presence of bacteria-like organisms in the lumen of the gastric glands. (wikipedia.org)
  • Disorders
  • capitata (AEB) in order to validate ethnobotanical claims regarding the plant use in the gastric disorders. (scielo.br)
  • 572) Liver abscess and sequelae of chronic liver disease (572.2) Coma, hepatic (572.4) Hepatorenal syndrome (573) Other disorders of liver (573.3) Hepatitis, toxic (574) Cholelithiasis (574.3) Choledocholithiasis (575) Other disorders of gallbladder (575.0) Cholecystitis, acute (575.9) Gallbladder disease, unspec. (wikipedia.org)
  • epithelial
  • So far, it has not been possible to culture normal human gastric primary epithelial cells long enough to permit experimental investigations into many of the processes that underlie gastric pathology. (bmj.com)
  • Troxipide has been observed to enhance PG-stimulated increase in gastric mucosal output, accelerated epithelial restitution and mucosal healing. (wikipedia.org)
  • gastrointestinal
  • Anaemia, caused by both chronic blood loss from the gastrointestinal tract and reduced absorption due to the up-regulation of hepcidin should also be treated, and this often requires the use of parenteral iron. (wikipedia.org)
  • Aspirin is an effective analgesic for acute pain, but is generally considered inferior to ibuprofen for the alleviation of pain because aspirin is more likely to cause gastrointestinal bleeding. (wikipedia.org)
  • Parietal
  • Gastric parietal cells are rich in mitochondria which provide energy in the form of ATP for cells by oxidative phosphorylation, critical to maintain the proper morphology and function of gastric mucosa. (wikipedia.org)
  • Vascular
  • The mucosa, or mucus membrane, that can be found in the nasal cavity is highly vascular, helping to warm and moisten incoming air and is important for smel. (reference.com)
  • 557) Vascular insufficiency of intestine (557.0) Vascular insufficiency, acute, intestine (557.9) Ischemic bowel disease, unspec. (wikipedia.org)
  • Intestinal
  • This drug acts locally: it envelops the intestinal mucosa, preventing it from being absorbed into the bloodstream by toxins and microbes, inhibits the peristalsis of the digestive tract, reducing the urge to vomit. (intoxication-stop.com)
  • endoscopic
  • There was no correlation between endoscopic and histological gastritis in contrast to a significant correlation for duodenitis. (bmj.com)
  • lesion
  • Experimental studies have demonstrated that troxipide restrains NSAID-induced generation of porphyrins, tissue peroxidation and gastric lesion formation. (wikipedia.org)