• symptoms
  • While hoarseness is a common symptom (or complaint) of dysphonia, there are several other signs and symptoms that can be present such as: breathiness, roughness, and dryness. (wikipedia.org)
  • pitch
  • Unilateral paralytic dysphonia with the cord in the paramedian position may also resemble myasthenia laryngis auditorily, but an effortful volume at the optimal pitch level may reveal a natural voice. (voice-doctor.com)
  • If the patient is able to laugh at his optimal pitch level with a clear tone that is not breathy, the patient has bowed vocal folds . (voice-doctor.com)
  • If the sound continues to be breathy when the patient is using the optimal pitch level, then myasthenia laryngis may be present. (voice-doctor.com)
  • affects
  • While the causes of dysphonia can be divided into five basic categories, all of them result in an interruption of the ability of the vocal folds to vibrate normally during exhalation, which affects the voice. (wikipedia.org)
  • This causes a breathy voice and is potentially life-threatening if it affects the ability to swallow correctly. (everything2.com)
  • Psychological trauma as a causative factor may be a death, a divorce, an accident, possible or actual loss of job or position, or any comparable incident that affects the individual emotionally and is reflected in his voice, creating a dysphonia. (voice-doctor.com)
  • patients
  • Thyroid functional status was evaluated biochemically and the patients were divided into four categories: recurrent hyperthyroidism, euthyroidism, latent hypothyroidism, and hypothyroidism. (biomedsearch.com)
  • The aim of the present study was to investigate the functional and/or pathological significance of the hemispherical lateralization of TRH using radioimmunoassay to determine the TRH concentration of nuclei and areas within the hypothalamus of suicide patients, with matching measurement being carried out on control subjects. (biomedsearch.com)
  • The use of advanced neuroimaging methodologies together with extensive analyses of brain functional and structural organization in these patients is anticipated to yield novel results, which will be critical for the establishment of criteria for improved clinical management of this disorder," said Dr. Simonyan. (mountsinai.org)
  • In this paper, only spastic dysphonia, and those patients diagnosed as having spastic dysphonia will be discussed. (voice-doctor.com)
  • Patients with spastic dysphonia have a voice image and a voice identity which have contributed to the onset or continuation of their voice disorders by creating and continuing voice misuse and abuse. (voice-doctor.com)
  • Speech
  • The distinction between these broad classes stems from their cause, whereby organic dysphonia results from some sort of physiological change in one of the subsystems of speech (for voice, usually respiration, laryngeal anatomy, and/or other parts of the vocal tract are affected). (wikipedia.org)
  • include
  • Functional voice disorders include disorders caused by improper muscle functioning or improper learning patterns to use the voice. (medindia.net)
  • Swallowing disorders include difficulties in any system of the swallowing process (i.e. oral, pharyngeal, esophageal), as well as functional dysphagia and feeding disorders. (wikipedia.org)
  • However
  • In some cases, however, the dysphonia can be high-pitched because of a compensated lengthening of the vocal folds to achieve better glottic closure. (medscape.com)
  • problems
  • Furthermore, a voice can be classified as dysphonic when it poses problems in the functional or occupational needs of the individual or is inappropriate for their age or sex. (wikipedia.org)
  • cases
  • In some cases of unilateral paralytic dysphonia , the paralyzed cord is bowed in the midline position or in the paramedian position. (voice-doctor.com)