• larynx
  • The assessment and diagnosis of dysphonia is done by a multidisciplinary team, and involves the use of a variety of subjective and objective measures, which look at both the quality of the voice as well as the physical state of the larynx. (wikipedia.org)
  • symptoms
  • While hoarseness is a common symptom (or complaint) of dysphonia, there are several other signs and symptoms that can be present such as: breathiness, roughness, and dryness. (wikipedia.org)
  • pitch
  • Unilateral paralytic dysphonia with the cord in the paramedian position may also resemble myasthenia laryngis auditorily, but an effortful volume at the optimal pitch level may reveal a natural voice. (voice-doctor.com)
  • If the patient is able to laugh at his optimal pitch level with a clear tone that is not breathy, the patient has bowed vocal folds . (voice-doctor.com)
  • If the sound continues to be breathy when the patient is using the optimal pitch level, then myasthenia laryngis may be present. (voice-doctor.com)
  • organic
  • Dysphonia can be categorized into two broad main types: organic and functional. (wikipedia.org)
  • Voice disorders can be divided into 2 broad categories: organic and functional. (wikipedia.org)
  • The distinction between these broad classes stems from their cause, whereby organic dysphonia results from some sort of physiological change in one of the subsystems of speech (for voice, usually respiration, laryngeal anatomy, and/or other parts of the vocal tract are affected). (wikipedia.org)
  • The voice therapist may be able to determine if the patient has temporarily bowed vocal folds (functional or organic) or myasthenia laryngis in the final stage. (voice-doctor.com)
  • The condition of bowed vocal folds (functional or organic) may be considered to be on a continuum leading to myasthenia laryngis (first stage and second stage) if voice misuse is persistent. (voice-doctor.com)
  • structural
  • in contrast, structural dysphonia is defined as impacted functioning of the vocal mechanism that is caused by some sort of physical change (e.g. a lesion on the vocal folds). (wikipedia.org)
  • Those who have a functional voice problem may develop structural lesion due to abuse of voice. (medindia.net)
  • The use of advanced neuroimaging methodologies together with extensive analyses of brain functional and structural organization in these patients is anticipated to yield novel results, which will be critical for the establishment of criteria for improved clinical management of this disorder," said Dr. Simonyan. (mountsinai.org)
  • Speech
  • The study, based on an analysis of the 2015 National Health and Aging Trends Study, found that among the approximately eight million Medicare beneficiaries who received rehabilitation in 2015, 72 percent reported functional improvement following physical, occupational or speech-language therapy rehabilitation. (accessnetwork.us)
  • closure
  • In some cases, however, the dysphonia can be high-pitched because of a compensated lengthening of the vocal folds to achieve better glottic closure. (medscape.com)
  • sound
  • However, William Vennard points out that while most untrained people can sound comparatively "breathy" or "hooty" when using falsetto production, there are in rarer cases individuals who have developed a much stronger falsetto sound production which has more "ring" to it. (wikipedia.org)
  • cases
  • In some cases of unilateral paralytic dysphonia , the paralyzed cord is bowed in the midline position or in the paramedian position. (voice-doctor.com)
  • study
  • The aim of the present study was to investigate the functional and/or pathological significance of the hemispherical lateralization of TRH using radioimmunoassay to determine the TRH concentration of nuclei and areas within the hypothalamus of suicide patients, with matching measurement being carried out on control subjects. (biomedsearch.com)
  • patients
  • Thyroid functional status was evaluated biochemically and the patients were divided into four categories: recurrent hyperthyroidism, euthyroidism, latent hypothyroidism, and hypothyroidism. (biomedsearch.com)