• Hydrogen
  • He also presciently wrote "One of the functions of this enzyme appears to be to prevent any accumulation of hydrogen peroxide which might be formed as a by-product in the series of energetic oxidations that characterize the cellular respiration process. (hindawi.com)
  • structural and functional
  • Medical biology based on molecular biology combines all issues of developing molecular medicine into large-scale structural and functional relationships of the human genome, transcriptome, proteome, physiome and metabolome with the particular point of view of devising new technologies for prediction, diagnosis and therapy Biomedicine involves the study of (patho-) physiological processes with methods from biology and physiology. (wikipedia.org)
  • bodily
  • An internal parasite (such as a liver fluke) can illustrate the distinction: such a parasite may have a very simple bodily structure, but nevertheless the organism is highly adapted to its specific environment. (wikipedia.org)
  • Examples
  • Examples include using living fibroblasts in skin replacement or repair, cartilage repaired with living chondrocytes, or other types of cells used in other ways. (wikipedia.org)
  • Tissues
  • Multiple globins are also normally expressed in non-erythroid vertebrate cells and tissues [ 4 , 5 ], and globin expression is deranged in cancer cells [ 6 - 9 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • Tissue engineering is the use of a combination of cells, engineering and materials methods, and suitable biochemical and physicochemical factors to improve or replace biological tissues. (wikipedia.org)
  • The term regenerative medicine is often used synonymously with tissue engineering, although those involved in regenerative medicine place more emphasis on the use of stem cells or progenitor cells to produce tissues. (wikipedia.org)
  • Scientific advances in biomaterials, stem cells, growth and differentiation factors, and biomimetic environments have created unique opportunities to fabricate tissues in the laboratory from combinations of engineered extracellular matrices ("scaffolds"), cells, and biologically active molecules. (wikipedia.org)
  • Among the major challenges now facing tissue engineering is the need for more complex functionality, as well as both functional and biomechanical stability and vascularization in laboratory-grown tissues destined for transplantation. (wikipedia.org)
  • fungi
  • An arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus (plural mycorrhizae or mycorrhizas, a.k.a. endomycorrhiza, AM fungi, or AMF) is a type of mycorrhiza in which the fungus penetrates the cortical cells of the roots of a vascular plant. (wikipedia.org)
  • There is some fossil evidence that suggests that the parasitic fungi did not kill the host cells immediately upon invasion, although a response to the invasion was observed in the host cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • stresses
  • Kirk agonises over who to choose - McCoy has the biological expertiese which may prove invaluable, but on the other hand Spock is better suited physically to survive the stresses involved in flying into the creature. (ditl.org)
  • yeast
  • Four groups are using yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model organism to study various aspects of cell genetics and physiology: genetic regulation of metabolism (dr hab. (waw.pl)
  • One group (prof. A. Paszewski) is using filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans and yeast cells to study genetic control of sulfur metabolism and one group (dr hab. (waw.pl)
  • Besides elevated tRNA transcription, Maf1-depleted yeast cells manifest the inability to grow on a non-fermentable carbon source. (waw.pl)
  • normally
  • Unlike free fatty acids, ketone bodies can cross the blood-brain barrier and are therefore available as fuel for the cells of the central nervous system, acting as a substitute for glucose, on which these cells normally survive. (wikipedia.org)
  • fish
  • At the most extreme, some air-breathing fish are able to survive in damp burrows for weeks without water, entering a state of aestivation (summertime hibernation) until water returns. (wikipedia.org)
  • host
  • A Virus reproduces by injecting DNA into the cells of the host and reprogramming them to produce more viruses. (ditl.org)
  • The wide variety of siderophores may be due to evolutionary pressures placed on microbes to produce structurally different siderophores which cannot be transported by other microbes' specific active transport systems, or in the case of pathogens deactivated by the host organism. (wikipedia.org)
  • cultures
  • Recently Dr. Damian Graczyk established a new team and organized a laboratory for studying human cells in cultures. (waw.pl)
  • citation needed] Before this, laboratory cultures of healthy, noncancerous mammalian cells would only divide a fixed number of times, up to the Hayflick limit, before dying. (wikipedia.org)
  • exhibit
  • Invertebrates exhibit a wide range of modifications to survive in poorly oxygenated waters including breathing tubes (see insect and mollusc siphons) and gills (Carcinus). (wikipedia.org)
  • different
  • For example, they can produce different toxins (phytoalexins) against invaders or they can induce rapid cell death in invading cells to hinder the pests from spreading out. (wikipedia.org)
  • laboratory
  • Artificial bone marrow Artificial bone Laboratory-grown penis Oral mucosa tissue engineering Foreskin Tissue engineering utilizes living cells as engineering materials. (wikipedia.org)
  • structures
  • The stored protein reserves in vegetative cells provide the building blocks for rapid expansion of vegetative structures after periods of dormancy. (prezi.com)
  • human
  • Doris Taylor's heart in a jar Tissue-engineered airway Tissue-engineered vessels Artificial skin constructed from human skin cells embedded in a hydrogel, such as in the case of bioprinted constructs for battlefield burn repairs. (wikipedia.org)
  • wide
  • The scope of ecology contains a wide array of interacting levels of organization spanning micro-level (e.g., cells) to a planetary scale (e.g., biosphere) phenomena. (wikipedia.org)
  • body
  • And this would happen without damaging the other cells of the body that have a typical number of chromosomes. (yeastgenome.org)
  • A thermoconforming organism, by contrast, simply adopts the surrounding temperature as its own body temperature, thus avoiding the need for internal thermoregulation. (wikipedia.org)
  • expression
  • Before humans would be able to "control" Nature, it was first necessary to identify what "controls" the expression of a living organism. (chirounity.com)
  • regulation
  • The balance between mitochondrial fusion and fission in cells is dictated by the up-and-down regulation of mitofusins, OPA1/Mgm1, and Drp1/Dnm1. (wikipedia.org)
  • specific
  • The term has also been applied to efforts to perform specific biochemical functions using cells within an artificially-created support system (e.g. an artificial pancreas, or a bio artificial liver). (wikipedia.org)
  • strategies
  • Not surprisingly, insects have evolved a number of strategies to deal with the rigors of winter temperatures in places where they would otherwise not survive. (wikipedia.org)
  • release
  • Neuroepithelial cells (NEC) are thought to be neuron-like chemoreceptor cells because they rely on membrane potential changes for the release of neurotransmitters and signal transmission onto nearby cells. (wikipedia.org)