• shortness of bre
  • Pulmonary disease/ Polyneuropathy: The lungs are often affected at more severe stages of the illness, although since by then physical exertion is usually limited by neuropathy, shortness of breath is unusual. (wikipedia.org)
  • physiology
  • Our research program is focused on how the dynamic regulation of blood flow through the lungs affects human physiology and performance as it relates to pulmonary gas exchange efficiency, pulmonary artery pressure and right heart function in health and disease. (google.com)
  • He has numerous research publications, predominantly in the following areas of pulmonary physiology: Investigation of pulmonary function, particularly ventilation-perfusion relationships. (wikipedia.org)
  • The usefulness of the subject can also be understood by seeing the use of Biofluid Dynamics in the areas of physiology in order to explain how living things work and about their motions, in developing an understanding of the origins and development of various diseases related to human body and diagnosing them, in finding the cure for the diseases related to cardiovascular and pulmonary systems. (wikipedia.org)
  • fibrosis
  • The fibrosis in IPF has been linked to cigarette smoking, environmental factors (e.g. occupational exposure to gases, smoke, chemicals or dusts), other medical conditions including gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), or to genetic predisposition (familial IPF). (wikipedia.org)
  • IPF is believed to be the result of an aberrant wound healing process including/involving abnormal and excessive deposition of collagen (fibrosis) in the pulmonary interstitium with minimal associated inflammation. (wikipedia.org)
  • cardiac
  • Gedeon A, Krill P, Osterlund B. Pulmonary blood flow (cardiac output) and the effective lung volume determined from a short breath hold using the differential Fick method. (springer.com)
  • Except for therapeutic hypothermia and revascularization, no novel therapies have been developed that improve survival or cardiac and neurological function after resuscitation. (ahajournals.org)
  • A single low dose of intravenous nitrite (50 nmol=1.85 μmol/kg=0.13 mg/kg) compared with blinded saline placebo given at cardiopulmonary resuscitation initiation with epinephrine improved cardiac function, survival, and neurological outcomes. (ahajournals.org)
  • 15,16 Except for the selective application of hypothermia and revascularization, no novel postresuscitation therapies have been developed that improve survival or cardiac and neurological function. (ahajournals.org)
  • Here, we provide evidence that nitrite therapy improves cardiac function, survival, and neurological function in survivors. (ahajournals.org)
  • Pulmonary edema, especially acute, can lead to fatal respiratory distress or cardiac arrest due to hypoxia. (wikipedia.org)
  • edema
  • It is due to either failure of the left ventricle of the heart to remove blood adequately from the pulmonary circulation (cardiogenic pulmonary edema), or an injury to the lung parenchyma or vasculature of the lung (noncardiogenic pulmonary edema). (wikipedia.org)
  • Play media The most common symptom of pulmonary edema is difficulty breathing, but may include other symptoms such as coughing up blood (classically seen as pink, frothy sputum), excessive sweating, anxiety, and pale skin. (wikipedia.org)
  • When directly or indirectly caused by increased left ventricular pressure pulmonary edema may form when mean pulmonary pressure rises from the normal of 15 mmHg to above 25 mmHg. (wikipedia.org)
  • Broadly, the causes of pulmonary edema can be divided into cardiogenic and non-cardiogenic. (wikipedia.org)
  • Congestive heart failure which is due to the heart's inability to pump the blood out of the pulmonary circulation at a sufficient rate resulting in elevation in wedge pressure and pulmonary edema - this may be due to left ventricular failure, arrhythmias, or fluid overload, e.g., from kidney failure or intravenous therapy. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hypertensive crisis can cause pulmonary edema as the elevation in blood pressure and increased afterload on the left ventricle hinders forward flow and causes the elevation in wedge pressure and subsequent pulmonary edema. (wikipedia.org)
  • Acute respiratory distress syndrome Injury to the lung may also cause pulmonary edema through injury to the vasculature and parenchyma of the lung. (wikipedia.org)
  • Reperfusion injury, i.e. postpulmonary thromboendartectomy or lung transplantation Swimming induced pulmonary edema also known as immersion pulmonary edema Transfusion Associated Circulatory Overload (TACO) occurs when multiple blood transfusions or blood-products (plasma, platelets, etc.) are transfused over a short period of time. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some causes of pulmonary edema are less well characterised and arguably represent specific instances of the broader classifications above. (wikipedia.org)
  • Arteriovenous malformation Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome High altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) Envenomation, such as with the venom of Atrax robustus Flash pulmonary edema (FPE), is rapid onset pulmonary edema. (wikipedia.org)
  • This may take several forms, including dependent peripheral edema, pulmonary edema, effusions such as pleural effusion or ascites, or generalized capillary leakage (anasarca). (wikipedia.org)
  • oxygen
  • Nitrite (NO 2 − ), historically considered inert, functions as a reservoir for nitric oxide (NO). 1 During physiological hypoxia and pathological ischemia, nitrite is reduced to NO, regulating hypoxic vasodilation, cellular respiration, mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, angiogenesis, 2 and cellular death programs. (ahajournals.org)
  • Maximal heart rate, maximal oxygen consumption, oxygen consumption at anaerobic threshold, and maximal respiratory exchange ratio were similar for the two groups. (biomedsearch.com)
  • People often benefit from pulmonary rehabilitation and supplemental oxygen. (wikipedia.org)
  • In nitrogen fixation by diazotrophic bacteria, and denitrification by heterotrophic bacteria (such as Paracoccus denitrificans and various pseudomonads), nitrogen gas is exchanged with the environment, being taken up by the former and released into it by the latter, while giant tube worms rely on bacteria to oxidize hydrogen sulfide extracted from their deep sea environment, using dissolved oxygen in the water as an electron acceptor. (wikipedia.org)
  • physiological
  • Moreover, future applications for medical diagnosis and therapy control with dynamic assessments of normal physiological function or pharmacodynamics are intended. (wikipedia.org)
  • These factors are related to both the breath sampling protocols as well as the complex physiological mechanisms underlying pulmonary gas exchange. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although, exercise training does not directly improve lung function, it causes several physiological adaptations to exercise which can improve physical condition. (wikipedia.org)
  • gills
  • Gas exchange takes place in the gills which consist of thin or very flat filaments and lammelae which expose a very large surface area of highly vascularized tissue to the water. (wikipedia.org)
  • blood
  • CD gas is rapidly absorbed in blood and peritoneum, colorless, does not support combustion, and generally has few systemic side effects in healthy patients. (blogs.com)
  • Specifically, CD is relatively benign because most of the gas in the blood is bound to terminal amino groups of hemoglobin or converted to bicarbonate. (blogs.com)
  • Normal ekgs, event monitor(pvc's), normal echo and stress test.Normal blood tests and thyroid function.Scared of sca/ha? (healthtap.com)
  • Blood tests to assess kidney function like serum creatinine and a normal ua . (healthtap.com)
  • Breath gas concentration can then be related to blood concentrations via mathematical modeling as for example in blood alcohol testing. (wikipedia.org)
  • The simplest model relating breath gas concentration to blood concentrations was developed by Farhi C A = C v ¯ λ b:air + V ˙ A / Q ˙ c , {\displaystyle C_{A}={\frac {C_{\bar {v}}}{\lambda _{\text{b:air}}+{\dot {V}}_{A}/{\dot {Q}}_{c}}},} where C A {\displaystyle C_{A}} denotes the alveolar concentration which is assumed to be equal to the measured concentration. (wikipedia.org)
  • Blood moves from the tissue capillary to the pulmonary capillary where CO2 is exchanged at the lung. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the pulmonary capillary, bicarbonate can not simply diffuse either into the Red Blood Cell or the alvioli. (wikipedia.org)
  • In this way, plasma HCO3- can be converted to CO2 within the plasma compartment and exchanged with the alvioli without the requirement of returning the HCO3- to the interior of the Red Blood Cell. (wikipedia.org)
  • The fluid coating is produced by the body in order to facilitate the transfer of gases between blood and alveolar air. (wikipedia.org)
  • Peripheral
  • Peripheral chemoreceptor function after carbonic anhydrase inhibition during moderate-intensity exercise. (biomedsearch.com)
  • To reduce symptoms To improve knowledge of lung condition and promote self-management To increase muscle strength and endurance (peripheral and respiratory) To increase the exercise tolerance To reduce length of hospital stay To help to function better in day-to-day life To help in managing anxiety and depression Reduction in number of days spent in hospital one year following pulmonary rehabilitation. (wikipedia.org)
  • symptoms
  • In summary, despite significant preoperative symptoms, cardiopulmonary performance during exercise in patients with tetralogy of Fallot and absent pulmonary valve is similar to patients with tetralogy of Fallot repaired with a transannular patch. (biomedsearch.com)
  • molecule
  • D is the diffusion coefficient, which will differ from gas to gas, and from membrane to membrane, according to the size of the gas molecule in question, and the nature of the membrane itself (particularly its viscosity, temperature and hydrophobicity). (wikipedia.org)
  • assess
  • Aim: To assess the pulmonary function parameters including alveolar gas exchange in patients with Type 2 Diabetes mellitus and to find the influence of hyperglycaemia and duration of diabetes. (jcdr.in)
  • To assess this hypothesis, nine patients with tetralogy of Fallot and absent pulmonary valve underwent exercise testing and were compared to 38 patients with tetralogy of Fallot repaired using a transannular patch. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Our findings show that the proposed technique can be used to assess lung function, and has several advantages over conventional methods such as compact and portable apparatus, easy usage, and quick estimation of cardiopulmonary variables. (ox.ac.uk)
  • disorders
  • Pulmonary function testing in patients with neuromuscular disorders helps to evaluate the respiratory status of patients at the time of diagnosis, monitor their progress and course, evaluate them for possible surgery, and gives an overall idea of the prognosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Clinical
  • Conventional methods for monitoring lung function can require complex, or special, gas analysers, and may therefore not be practical in clinical areas such as the intensive care unit (ICU) or operating theatre. (ox.ac.uk)
  • Breath gas analysis is a method for gaining non-invasive information on the clinical state of an individual by monitoring volatile organic compounds present in the exhaled breath. (wikipedia.org)
  • volatile organic c
  • The area of modern breath testing commenced in 1971, when Nobel Prize winner Linus Pauling demonstrated that human breath is a complex gas, containing more than 200 different volatile organic compounds. (wikipedia.org)
  • Inhalation
  • At the end of inhalation the airways are filled with environmental air, which is exhaled without coming in contact with the gas exchanger. (wikipedia.org)
  • rehabilitation
  • In general, pulmonary rehabilitation refers to a series of services that are administered to patients of respiratory disease and their families, typically to attempt to improve the quality of life for the patient. (wikipedia.org)
  • Pulmonary rehabilitation may be carried out in a variety of settings, depending on the patient's needs, and may or may not include pharmacologic intervention. (wikipedia.org)
  • Reduced exacerbations post pulmonary rehabilitation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although there are no universally accepted procedure codes for pulmonary rehabilitation, providers usually use codes for general therapeutic processes. (wikipedia.org)
  • The goal of pulmonary rehabilitation is to help improve the well-being and quality of life of the patient and their families. (wikipedia.org)
  • Exercise is the cornerstone of pulmonary rehabilitation programs. (wikipedia.org)
  • concentration
  • Membrane bound CA (CA IV) on the luminal side of the pulmonary membrane would have direct contact with plasma HCO3- and would enzimatically convert HCO3- to CO2 in the area immediately proximal to the exchange membrane, greatly increasing the concentration gradient for exchange. (wikipedia.org)
  • Gas molecules move from a region in which they are at high concentration to one in which they are at low concentration. (wikipedia.org)
  • φ is the concentration of the gas. (wikipedia.org)
  • If the two compartments are individually well-mixed, then this is simplifies to the difference in concentration of the gas between the inside and outside compartments divided by the thickness of the membrane. (wikipedia.org)
  • The negative sign indicates that the diffusion is always in the direction that - over time - will destroy the concentration gradient, i.e. the gas moves from high concentration to low concentration until eventually the inside and outside compartments reach equilibrium. (wikipedia.org)
  • In general, the higher the concentration gradient across the gas-exchanging surface, the faster the rate of diffusion across it. (wikipedia.org)
  • Conversely, the thinner the gas-exchanging surface (for the same concentration difference), the faster the gases will diffuse across it. (wikipedia.org)
  • metabolic
  • Gases are constantly consumed and produced by cellular and metabolic reactions in most living things, so an efficient system for gas exchange between, ultimately, the interior of the cell(s) and the external environment is required. (wikipedia.org)