• hereditary fructose in
  • A case of hereditary fructose intolerance is reported in a girl aged 2 years at the time of her death. (bmj.com)
  • Hereditary fructose intolerance and glycogen storage disease have been confused in the past on clinical grounds, but a high liver glycogen level has not previously been reported in hereditary fructose intolerance. (bmj.com)
  • Defects in aldolase A cause Glycogen storage disease 12 (GSD12) [ PMID: 14766013 ], while defects in aldolase B result in hereditary fructose intolerance [ PMID: 15880727 ]. (ebi.ac.uk)
  • The spectrum of aldolase B (ALDOB) mutations and the prevalence of hereditary fructose intolerance in Central Europe. (ebi.ac.uk)
  • high
  • So how can we stay away from foods high in fructose? (dietsinreview.com)
  • In animal models, the effects of a high fructose diet on fat distribution are inconclusive in that some studies find increases in body mass and lipids while others find no effect. (gsu.edu)
  • The following experiments tested the hypotheses that a high fructose diet alters fat distribution rather than total body mass and impairs hippocampal-dependent memory. (gsu.edu)
  • Results indicated that the high fructose diet did not affect fat distribution, but did increase plasma triacylglycerides. (gsu.edu)
  • These results indicate that a high fructose diet impairs brain function. (gsu.edu)
  • researchers
  • The researchers recommended that patients with arcane symptoms must be tested with a noninvasive breath test before dismissing their symptoms as either imprecise or ahead of making a diagnosis of functional bowel disorder, because fructose intolerance is treatable. (blogspot.com)
  • study
  • Fructose intolerance may be the origin for unexplained gastrointestinal (GI) indicators in numerous patients, according to the outcome of a presentation study in print in the June 2003 issue of the American Journal of Gastroenterology. (blogspot.com)
  • different
  • There are two classes of fructose-bisphosphate aldolases with different catalytic mechanisms: class I enzymes [ PMID: 3355497 ] do not require a metal ion, and are characterised by the formation of a Schiff base intermediate between a highly conserved active site lysine and a substrate carbonyl group, while the class II enzymes require an active-site divalent metal ion. (ebi.ac.uk)
  • The fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolases: same reaction, different enzymes. (ebi.ac.uk)