• skull
  • These air sinuses lighten the weight of the skull and give resonance to the voice. (thehealthsuccesssite.com)
  • The biological role of the sinuses is debated, but a number of possible functions have been proposed:[citation needed] Decreasing the relative weight of the front of the skull, and especially the bones of the face. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sinuses are mucosa-lined airspaces within the bones of the face and skull. (wikipedia.org)
  • These bones are expanded into broad, flat plates, as in the cranium (skull), the ilium (pelvis), sternum and the rib cage. (wikipedia.org)
  • The intervening cancellous tissue is called the diploë, and this, in the nasal region of the skull, becomes absorbed so as to leave spaces filled with air-the paranasal sinuses between the two tables. (wikipedia.org)
  • shown in red) Flat bones in human skull. (wikipedia.org)
  • An osteoma (plural: "osteomata") is a new piece of bone usually growing on another piece of bone, typically the skull. (wikipedia.org)
  • Additionally, the sinuses within the skull are able to drain through the nasal passage. (wikipedia.org)
  • These consist of: Frontal sinuses: Occupy the dorsal (top) part of the skull, between the eyes. (wikipedia.org)
  • A skull fracture is a break in one or more of the eight bones that form the cranial portion of the skull, usually occurring as a result of blunt force trauma. (wikipedia.org)
  • If the force of the impact is excessive, the bone may fracture at or near the site of the impact and cause damage to the underlying physical structures contained within the skull such as the membranes, blood vessels, and brain. (wikipedia.org)
  • While an uncomplicated skull fracture can occur without associated physical or neurological damage and is in itself usually not clinically significant, a fracture in healthy bone indicates that a substantial amount of force has been applied and increases the possibility of associated injury. (wikipedia.org)
  • Basilar fractures are in the bones at the base of the skull. (wikipedia.org)
  • The human skull is anatomically divided into two parts: the neurocranium, formed by eight cranial bones that houses and protect the brain-and the facial skeleton (viscerocranium) composed of fourteen bones, not including the three ossicles of the inner ear. (wikipedia.org)
  • The bones of the skull are in three layers: the hard compact layer of the external table (lamina externa), the diploë (a spongy layer of red bone marrow in the middle, and the compact layer of the inner table (Lamina interna). (wikipedia.org)
  • Areas of the skull that are covered with muscle have no underlying diploë formation between the internal and external lamina, which results in thin bone more susceptible to fractures. (wikipedia.org)
  • Skull fractures occur more easily at the thin squamous temporal and parietal bones, the sphenoid sinus, the foramen magnum (the opening at the base of the skull that the spinal cord passes through), the petrous temporal ridge, and the inner portions of the sphenoid wings at the base of the skull. (wikipedia.org)
  • Linear skull fractures are breaks in the bone that transverse the full thickness of the skull from the outer to inner table. (wikipedia.org)
  • Linear skull fractures are usually of little clinical significance unless they parallel in close proximity or transverse a suture, or they involve a venous sinus groove or vascular channel. (wikipedia.org)
  • In young children, although rare, the possibility exists of developing a growing skull fracture especially if the fracture occurs in the parietal bone. (wikipedia.org)
  • The vertebral column usually contains 54 bones: 7 cervical vertebrae, including the atlas (C1) and axis (C2) which support and help move the skull, 18 (or rarely, 19) thoracic, 5-6 lumbar, 5 sacral (which fuse together to form the sacrum), and 15-25 caudal vertebrae with an average of 18. (wikipedia.org)
  • Vomer
  • The vomer bone lies below and to the back (posteroinferiorly), and partially forms the choanal opening into the nasopharynx, (the upper portion of the pharynx that is continuous with the nasal passages). (wikipedia.org)
  • The nasal septum is composed of the quadrangular cartilage, the vomer bone (the perpendicular plate of the ethmoid bone), aspects of the premaxilla, and the palatine bones. (wikipedia.org)
  • pterygoid notch pterygoid fossa scaphoid fossa pterygoid hamulus pterygoid canal pterygospinous process sella turcica The sphenoid articulates with the frontal, parietal, ethmoid, temporal, zygomatic, palatine, vomer, and occipital bones and helps to connect the neurocranium to the facial skeleton. (wikipedia.org)
  • lacrimal
  • Above and to the side (superolaterally), the paired nasal bones connect to the lacrimal bones, and below and to the side (inferolaterally), they attach to the ascending processes of the maxilla (upper jaw). (wikipedia.org)
  • coronary sinus
  • coronary sinus the dilated terminal portion of the great cardiac vein, receiving blood from other veins draining the heart muscle and emptying into the right atrium. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • distal
  • In patients with more profound anemia, changes may be noted in the distal bones of the extremities. (medscape.com)
  • The horse's proximal digital sesamoids are simply called the "sesamoid bones" by horsemen, his distal digital sesamoid is referred to as the navicular bone. (wikipedia.org)
  • Distal sesamoidean ligaments: run from the sesamoid bones to the two pastern bones. (wikipedia.org)
  • ostium
  • The results of experimental studies suggest that the natural ventilation-rate of a sinus with a single sinus ostium (opening), is extremely slow. (wikipedia.org)
  • The pressure differentials are directed to the center of the sinuses producing mucosal edema, transudation, and mucosal-or submucosal-hematoma, leading to further occlusion of the sinus ostium. (wikipedia.org)
  • The magnitude of the pressure difference needed to produce a barotrauma probably shows great individual variation and is related to the size of the sinus ostium and the rate of ambient pressure change. (wikipedia.org)
  • Fractures
  • Depressed fractures are usually comminuted, with broken portions of bone displaced inward-and may require surgical intervention to repair underlying tissue damage. (wikipedia.org)