• proximal
  • The hour-glass interlocking nail includes a proximal section, a mid section, and a distal section. (google.fr)
  • The proximal and distal sections each have a diameter larger than the mid section so that the interlocking nail has an hour-glass geometry. (google.fr)
  • The hour-glass interlocking nail comprises at least one fixation aperture located within either the proximal or distal section of the hour-glass interlocking nail. (google.fr)
  • 2. An hour-glass interlocking nail as recited by claim 1 , wherein said proximal and said distal sections of said hour-glass interlocking nail each have two said fixation apertures. (google.fr)
  • It has 27 bones, not including the sesamoid bone, the number of which varies between people, 14 of which are the phalanges (proximal, intermediate and distal) of the fingers and thumb. (wikipedia.org)
  • The heel of the hand is the area anteriorly to the bases of the metacarpal bones, located in the proximal part of the palm. (wikipedia.org)
  • The skeleton of the human hand consists of 27 bones: the eight short carpal bones of the wrist are organized into a proximal row (scaphoid, lunate, triquetral and pisiform) which articulates with the bones of the forearm, and a distal row (trapezium, trapezoid, capitate and hamate), which articulates with the bases of the five metacarpal bones of the hand. (wikipedia.org)
  • atypical
  • Two separate studies by researchers from Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) and Columbia University Medical Center revealed data suggesting that long-term suppression of bone remodeling by bisphosphonate treatments may alter the material properties of bone, potentially affecting the bone's mechanical integrity and potentially contributing to the risk of atypical fractures. (healthcanal.com)
  • Recent research suggests that suppressed bone remodeling from long-term bisphosphonate use might result in brittle bone that is prone to atypical fractures," said Gladnick. (healthcanal.com)
  • The study found that, although there were no differences in bone micro-architecture between groups, the material properties of bone in bisphosphonate-treated patients displayed reduced bone tissue heterogeneity, which may be associated with reduced strength and potentially may contribute to the presentation of atypical fractures. (healthcanal.com)
  • This tells us that there may be some measurable differences in bone quality parameters in patients on long-term bisphosphonate therapy, which might contribute to the development of atypical fractures. (healthcanal.com)
  • Heterotopic ossification is a process resulting in the formation of bone tissue that is often atypical, at an extraskeletal location. (wikipedia.org)
  • Osteogenesis
  • Ossification (or osteogenesis) in bone remodeling is the process of laying down new bone material by cells called osteoblasts. (wikipedia.org)
  • In fracture healing, endochondral osteogenesis is the most commonly occurring process, for example in fractures of long bones treated by plaster of Paris, whereas fractures treated by open reduction and internal fixation with metal plates, screws, pins, rods and nails may heal by intramembranous osteogenesis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dystrophic calcification Mechanostat, a model describing ossification and bone loss Ossicone, the horn-like (or antler-like) protuberances on the heads of giraffes and related species Osteogenesis imperfecta, a juvenile bone disease Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva, an extremely rare genetic disease which causes fibrous tissue (muscle, tendon, ligament etc.) to ossify when damaged Primrose syndrome, a rare genetic disease in which cartilage becomes ossified. (wikipedia.org)
  • soft-tissue
  • 3. Massive soft tissue injury. (saiorthocare.com)
  • Decomposition in animals is a process that begins immediately after death and involves the destruction of soft tissue, leaving behind skeletonized remains. (wikipedia.org)
  • The chemical process of decomposition is complex and involves the breakdown of soft tissue, as the body passes through the sequential stages of decomposition. (wikipedia.org)
  • The decomposition of soft tissue is characterized by the breakdown of these macromolecules, and thus a large proportion of the decomposition products should reflect the amount of protein and fat content initially present in the body. (wikipedia.org)
  • During the early stages of decomposition, soft tissue proteins are broken down. (wikipedia.org)
  • Muscles
  • It is essential to form and maintain bones and teeth, and needed for normal functioning of muscles, clotting of blood and transmitting nerve signals. (nkfs.org)
  • Sharp pain when any movement is made Referred pain: dull to extreme ache in and around clavicle area, including surrounding muscles Possible nausea, dizziness, and/or spotty vision due to extreme pain Clavicle fractures are commonly known as a breaking of the collarbone, and they are usually a result of injury or trauma. (wikipedia.org)
  • scar tissue
  • Mechanical lameness is caused by a physical abnormality, such as scar tissue, that prevents normal motion of a limb. (wikipedia.org)
  • It results in the formation of scar tissue and produces a characteristic gait where the horse prematurely "slaps" the ground with its hind foot, shortening the stride length in the damaged leg. (wikipedia.org)
  • enhance bone
  • I'm finishing my Master's thesis on the application of vibration to enhance bone recovery following a period of disuse (~hindlimb unloading in rats). (letsrun.com)
  • medullary cavity
  • A perichondrium layer surrounding the cartilage forms the periosteum, which generates osteogenic cells that then go on to make a collar that encircles the outside of the bone and remodels the medullary cavity on the inside. (wikipedia.org)
  • The device is inserted into the medullary cavity of the broken bone and. (google.co.uk)
  • The device is inserted into the medullary cavity of the broken bone and the bladder is inflated to expand the bladder and extend the bone-contacting surfaces to the inner wall of the bone, where they adhere to and stabilize the bone. (google.co.uk)
  • typically
  • There is very little muscle cover over the elbow, so the wound typically reaches down to the surface of the bone. (horseandhound.co.uk)
  • Clavicle fractures are typically treated by putting the arm in a sling for one or two weeks. (wikipedia.org)
  • Typically, radiographs show defects in calcification and characteristic bony defects near the ends of major long bones. (wikipedia.org)
  • comprises
  • A bone treatment device comprises a shaft having a tubular wall, a lumen extending within the tubular wall, openings through the tubular wall, and anchoring elements adjacent the openings that can be deployed out of the openings in the presence of an actuating force within the shaft lumen. (google.fr)
  • 3. An hour-glass interlocking nail as recited by claim 1 , wherein said fixation aperture has a first aperture diameter and a second aperture diameter, and said first aperture diameter is larger than said second aperture diameter so that said fixation aperture comprises a self-tapping, tapered, locking design. (google.fr)
  • respiratory
  • Its job is to give tensile strength to both articular (found as supportive tissues in the ears, nose, trachea, larynx, and smaller respiratory tubes) and hyaline (found covering the articular surfaces of bones in synovial joints) cartilage, as well as the eye. (algaecal.com)
  • Neonates who manage to survive suffer increasing respiratory compromise due to softening of the bones (osteomalacia) and underdeveloped lungs (hypoplastic). (wikipedia.org)
  • Defects in the chest, such as flail chest resulting from rib fractures, lead to respiratory compromise and pneumonia. (wikipedia.org)
  • growth
  • The exact mechanisms by which bone development is triggered remains unclear, but it involves growth factors and cytokines in some way. (wikipedia.org)
  • Osteoarthritis is a combined vata-kapha condition in which vata (age, motion and stress) is responsible for provoking growth in an irregular fashion leading to bone spurs. (ayurvedacollege.com)
  • Rheumatoid arthritis is a sannipatika condition whereby vata pushes kapha to cause irregular bone growth. (ayurvedacollege.com)
  • Osteoblastic bone cancer is a sannipatika condition whereby vata simultaneously pushes kapha (bone growth) and fans the flames of agni within the affected tissue, creating a high metabolic state for growth. (ayurvedacollege.com)
  • collagen
  • Vitamin C deficiency, although uncommon in North America, results in your bones being unable to properly manufacture collagen and its connective tissues. (algaecal.com)
  • While collagen's overall function is the same in every tissue, to accommodate stretching of each tissue, the collagen shape depends on the type of tissue. (algaecal.com)
  • Collagen type I and type III are often found together, with type I being the predominant collagen in the tissue. (algaecal.com)
  • At this stage, some of the fibroblasts begin to lay down bone matrix in the form of collagen monomers. (wikipedia.org)
  • This mineralization of the collagen matrix stiffens it and transforms it into bone. (wikipedia.org)
  • cortical
  • However, after four years of use, these trends reversed, revealing an association between prolonged therapy and declining cortical bone structural integrity. (healthcanal.com)
  • structural
  • This study found that bisphosphonate use improved structural integrity early in the course of treatment, but those gains were diminished with long-term treatment. (healthcanal.com)
  • Several hypotheses have been proposed for how bone evolved as a structural element in vertebrates. (wikipedia.org)
  • Asthi dhatu is more than the structural tissues of the body. (ayurvedacollege.com)
  • process of remo
  • Scientists at both institutions noted that the culprit behind the diminishing results may be the fact that bisphosphonates suppress the body's natural process of remodeling bone. (healthcanal.com)
  • teeth
  • It is found primarily in bones and teeth. (nkfs.org)
  • In addition to the formation of the bones of the body, teeth are formed through this process and are thus the upadhatu (secondary tissue) of the production of asthi dhatu. (ayurvedacollege.com)
  • Tricho-dento-osseous syndrome (TDO) is a rare, systemic, autosomal dominant genetic disorder that causes defects in hair, teeth, and bones respectively. (wikipedia.org)
  • Changes in the long bones tend to appear later in development, but changes in the teeth appear once the teeth being to form, called primary dentition. (wikipedia.org)
  • wherein
  • inserting the reducer into a medullary canal of the second segment, wherein the reducer is used to assist aligning the segments of the fractured bone. (google.co.uk)
  • 2. A device in accordance with claim 1 wherein said bone-contacting surface is serrated. (google.co.uk)
  • 4. An hour-glass interlocking nail as recited by claim 1 , wherein said self-tapping, tapered, locking design of said fixation aperture is adapted to receive a screw-cone peg locking device. (google.fr)
  • Osteoblasts
  • The epiphyseal arteries and osteogenic cells invade the epiphysis, depositing osteoblasts and osteoclasts which erode the cartilage and build bone. (wikipedia.org)
  • Tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase (TNSALP) deficiency in osteoblasts and chondrocytes impairs bone mineralization, leading to rickets or osteomalacia. (wikipedia.org)
  • clavicle
  • A clavicle fracture, also known as a broken collarbone, is a bone fracture of the clavicle. (wikipedia.org)
  • Incidents that may lead to a clavicle fracture include automobile accidents, biking accidents (especially common in mountain biking), horizontal falls on the shoulder joint, or contact sports such as football, rugby, hurling, or wrestling. (wikipedia.org)
  • Newborns often present clavicle fractures following a difficult delivery. (wikipedia.org)
  • After fracture of the clavicle, the sternocleidomastoid muscle elevates the medial fragment of the bone. (wikipedia.org)
  • The clavicle is the bone that connects the trunk of the body to the arm, and it is located directly above the first rib. (wikipedia.org)
  • The basic method to check for a clavicle fracture is by an X-ray of the clavicle to determine the fracture type and extent of injury. (wikipedia.org)
  • In former times, X-rays were taken of both clavicle bones for comparison purposes. (wikipedia.org)
  • joints
  • Under certain circumstances, radiographic examination of the nearby joints is indicated in order to exclude dislocations and fracture-dislocations. (wikipedia.org)
  • reduction
  • Patients who had been treated with bisphosphonates showed a reduction in tissue heterogeneity, specifically with mineral content and crystal size compared with the control group," Gladnick said. (healthcanal.com)
  • patients
  • Bisphosphonate use still is a very effective solution that prevents bone loss in most patients and no one is recommending that physicians avoid prescribing these," said Dr. Rosenwasser. (healthcanal.com)
  • Patients with tibial shaft fractures present with pain and localized swelling. (wikipedia.org)
  • inflammation
  • Vata fans the flames of pitta causing inflammation and bone destruction. (ayurvedacollege.com)
  • Don't take any steroidal or non-steroidal anti-inflammatories (~ibuprofen)-- they slow tissue healing by inhibiting prostaglandin (~responsible for pain/inflammation). (letsrun.com)
  • shaft
  • The primary centre In long bones, bone tissue first appears in the diaphysis (middle of shaft). (wikipedia.org)
  • Anteroposterior (AP) and lateral radiographs the include the entire length of the lower leg (knee to ankle) are highly sensitive and specific for tibial shaft fractures. (wikipedia.org)
  • Closed fractures of the tibial shaft. (wikipedia.org)
  • The bone treatment device may further comprise an actuator configured to be received within the shaft lumen to deploy the anchoring elements out of the openings. (google.fr)
  • In the long bones, there is an abrupt change from a normal appearance in the shaft (diaphysis) to uncalcified regions near the ends (metaphysis), which suggests the occurrence of an abrupt metabolic change. (wikipedia.org)
  • metabolic
  • Osteoclastic bone cancer has a dual dosha pathology whereby vata combines with pitta resulting in a high metabolic state that destroys bone tissue. (ayurvedacollege.com)
  • Hypophosphatasia (also called deficiency of alkaline phosphatase or phosphoethanolaminuria) is a rare, and sometimes fatal, metabolic bone disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • bony
  • However, other possibilities include bony tissue evolving as an osmotic barrier, or as a protective structure. (wikipedia.org)
  • Injury
  • The principal aim of IGOT is to create long-term, sustainable solutions to the growing burden of musculoskeletal injury in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) through academic partnership. (frontiersin.org)
  • calcium
  • Calcification is synonymous with the formation of calcium-based salts and crystals within cells and tissue. (wikipedia.org)
  • Specifically, calcium-based minerals were stored in cartilage and bone was an exaptation development from this calcified cartilage. (wikipedia.org)
  • These monomers spontaneously assemble to form the bone matrix, for which bone crystals (calcium hydroxyapatite) are deposited in amongst, in the form of insoluble crystals. (wikipedia.org)
  • For example, any form of nicotine hinders the process of bone healing, and adequate nutrition (including calcium intake) will help the bone healing process. (wikipedia.org)
  • limb
  • We are able to make the horse comfortable and to bear weight on the injured limb immediately following the repair of an elbow fracture," continues Tim. (horseandhound.co.uk)
  • normal
  • It can take up to five months for the strength of the bone to return to normal. (wikipedia.org)
  • There are five digits attached to the hand, notably with a nail fixed to the end in place of the normal claw. (wikipedia.org)
  • present
  • Embodiments of the present invention include products and methods for reducing fractures with the aid of image guidance. (google.co.uk)