• femur
  • Features include supervisualization of intracranial contents caused by decreased mineralization of calvaria (also calvarial compressibility), bowing or fracture of the long bones, decreased bone length (especially of the femur), and multiple rib fractures. (medscape.com)
  • In order to achieve this he created the so-called 'Thomas Splint', which would stabilise a fractured femur and prevent infection. (wikipedia.org)
  • His work was never fully appreciated in his own lifetime, but when his nephew, Sir Robert Jones, applied his splint during the First World War, this reduced mortality of compound fractures of the femur from 87% to less than 8% in the period from 1916 to 1918. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is the second largest bone in the human body next to the femur. (wikipedia.org)
  • The upper surfaces of the condyles articulate with the femur to form the tibiofemoral joint, the weightbearing part of the kneejoint. (wikipedia.org)
  • Together with the medial and lateral condyle the intercondylar region forms the tibial plateau, which both articulates with and is anchored to the lower extremity of the femur. (wikipedia.org)
  • The central portions of these facets articulate with the condyles of the femur, while their peripheral portions support the menisci of the knee joint, which here intervene between the two bones. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ankle
  • This is used to bring the heel of the foot into varus deformity, and to prevent depression in the region of the head of the ankle bone. (wikipedia.org)
  • The tibia /ˈtɪbiə/ (plural tibiae /ˈtɪbii/ or tibias), also known as the shinbone or shankbone, is the larger and stronger of the two bones in the leg below the knee in vertebrates (the other being the fibula), and it connects the knee with the ankle bones. (wikipedia.org)
  • As in other vertebrates the tibia is one of two bones in the lower leg, the other being the fibula, and is a component of the knee and ankle joints. (wikipedia.org)
  • surgery
  • In fact, fear of falling was found to be more important than pain and depression when predicting functional recovery after hip fracture surgery in older adults . (va.gov)
  • Rearticulations of Orthopaedic Surgery: The Process of Specialty Boundary Formation and the Provision of Fracture Care in the United States. (wikipedia.org)
  • The field of hand surgery deals with both surgical and non-surgical treatment of conditions and problems that may take place in the hand or upper extremity (commonly from the tip of the hand to the shoulder) including injury and infection. (wikipedia.org)
  • Regardless of their original field of training, once candidates have completed an approved fellowship in hand surgery, all hand surgeons have received training in treating all injuries both to the bones and soft tissues of the hand and upper extremity. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hand surgeons going through these programs are trained in all aspects of hand surgery, combining and mastering all the skills traditionally associated with "Orthopedic hand surgeons" and "Plastic hand surgeons" to become equally adept at handling tendon, ligament and bone injuries as well as microsurgical reconstruction such as reattachment of severed parts or free tissue transfers and transplants. (wikipedia.org)
  • They also perform microsurgical reattachment of amputated digits and limbs, microsurgical reconstruction of soft tissues and bone, nerve reconstruction, and surgery to improve function in paralysed upper limbs. (wikipedia.org)
  • The following conditions can be indications for hand surgery: Hand injuries Carpal tunnel syndrome Carpometacarpal bossing Rheumatoid arthritis Dupuytren's contracture Congenital defects Tetraplegic upper limb surgery "About Hand Surgery", American Society for Surgery of the Hand. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery. (wikipedia.org)
  • Abnormal
  • It is important to understand what is considered abnormal, the work-up for abnormal fractures, the mechanism of fracture healing, and the risk factors for re-fracture. (springer.com)
  • A differential diagnosis is presented for abnormal fractures in the adolescent patient. (springer.com)
  • A portion of bone marrow will be withdrawn through a needle inserted into the hip bone and, at the same time, abnormal bone in the arms and legs will be sucked out using a needle. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • The abnormal bone will be replaced with a mixture of bone marrow and collagen (connective tissue protein) injected into the hole in the bone. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • The bone at these sites is rapidly resorbed and replaced by abnormal fibrous tissue. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • This will involve 1) the removal of abnormal tissue through percutaneous aspiration, and 2) the use of skeletal precursor cells taken from the unaffected sites, mixed with a bone grafting substitute, and injected into the affected sites to bring about an improvement in local bone quality and overall patient function. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare disease involving clonal proliferation of Langerhans cells, abnormal cells deriving from bone marrow and capable of migrating from skin to lymph nodes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Patients
  • Results from routine laboratory studies in patients with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) are usually within reference ranges and they are useful in ruling out other metabolic bone diseases such as hypophosphatasia or inherited forms of rickets. (medscape.com)
  • However, there is wide variation in the bone density of patients with OI. (medscape.com)
  • Currently, no standard of care exists for the management of this fracture-related pain in children discharged from the ED. Furthermore, discrepancies in analgesia administration to patients of various racial groups seeking emergency care have been documented but are poorly understood. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Design This is a prospective, un-blinded, observational study that will include patients seeking treatment for an upper extremity fracture. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Fragility fractures (i.e., fractures that occur as a result of a fall from standing height or less) are serious medical events that have high personal, social, and economic costs for patients, their families, and the wider community . (va.gov)
  • Importantly, the risk of death for patients who have a hip fracture is substantially increased in the first 6 months postfracture and persists for the following 6 years independent of other comorbidities . (va.gov)
  • This study will evaluate the effectiveness of a new bone injection technique for treating bone disease in patients with polyostotic fibrous dysplasia or McCune-Albright syndrome. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • In these patients, some bones develop areas with much less mineral, making the bones more prone to fracture or deformity and causing pain. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Patients 4 years of age and older with bone lesions that are highly likely to cause significant pain and illness may be eligible for this 2-year study. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Within 14 days of the bone injection procedure, patients will have a medical history, routine blood tests, urinalysis and check of vital signs (blood pressure, pulse and temperature) and will complete a 30-minute quality-of-life questionnaire. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Patients who do not have recent X-rays and bone density scans available for review will have new ones taken. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Bone injection - Patients will be given an anesthetic either to make them sleepy or put them to sleep completely. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Nine patients underwent repair of orbital floor fractures using the extraoral and the intraoral antral wall approach. (readbyqxmd.com)
  • A rumour had it that he would attack victims himself, and break their bones, in order to have patients on which to practice. (wikipedia.org)
  • fragility
  • Exercise to reduce the risk of fragility fractures is a relatively new application in stroke rehabilitation but is a promising treatment with the potential to reduce the incidence of falls as well as maintain or improve bone health. (va.gov)
  • femoral
  • Total Knee Arthroplasty Prosthesis  For fracture of patella With femoral and tibial component Ex. (scribd.com)
  • In 1768, Percivall Pott published his book Some Few Remarks upon Fractures and Dislocations following his compound femoral fracture on the use of splinting to avoid amputation. (wikipedia.org)
  • The use of his traction splint during the First World War lead to a dramatic reduction in the mortality following femoral fractures. (wikipedia.org)
  • orthopaedics
  • Several volumes of the Hippocratic Corpus, Articulations or On Joints, On Fractures, On the Instruments of Reduction discuss Ancient Greek medicine relating to orthopaedics, and Hippocrates is credited with a method of reduction of a dislocated shoulder. (wikipedia.org)
  • It was not until after World War II that orthopaedics became the dominant field treating fractures in much of the world. (wikipedia.org)
  • incidence
  • Analysis of 8,682 fractures with special reference to incidence, etiology and secular changes in a Swedish urban population 1950-1979. (springer.com)
  • Size-corrected BMD decreases during peak linear growth: implications for fracture incidence during adolescence. (springer.com)
  • Trapezium
  • When present, these bones are usually found near the base and trapezium and are the products of an additional centre of ossification, usually of the trapezium, that failed to fuse with the associated bone. (wikipedia.org)
  • fragments
  • In 1965, Gavriil Ilizarov determined that bone fragments could be carefully pulled apart without disrupting their alignment. (wikipedia.org)
  • These bone fragments could then grow back to a complete form. (wikipedia.org)
  • In complex cases of comminuted fractures, the Ilizarov apparatus method makes it possible to avoid squeezing the remnant fragments together, which otherwise might result in shortened limbs. (wikipedia.org)
  • deformity
  • No deformity of long bones is observed. (medscape.com)
  • He is also responsible for numerous other medical innovations that all carry his name: 'Thomas's collar' to treat tuberculosis of the cervical spine, 'Thomas's manoeuvre', an orthopaedic investigation for fracture of the hip joint, Thomas test, a method of detecting hip deformity by having the patient lying flat in bed, 'Thomas's wrench' for reducing fractures, as well as an osteoclast to break and reset bones. (wikipedia.org)
  • density
  • Bone mineral density, as measured with dual-energy radiographic absorptiometry (DRA), is generally low in children and adults with osteogenesis imperfecta. (medscape.com)
  • Still, normal bone density in a patient whom osteogenesis imperfecta is being evaluated should prompt consideration of alternate diagnoses. (medscape.com)
  • BBS = Berg Balance Scale, BMD = bone mineral density, DXA = dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, FAME = Fitness and Mobility Exercise (Program), ICTP = carboxy-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen, pQCT = peripheral quantitative computed tomography, PTH = parathyroid hormone, SD = standard deviation. (va.gov)
  • mineral
  • A six-year longitudinal study of the relationship of physical activity to bone mineral accrual in growing children: the University of Saskatchewan Bone Mineral Accrual Study. (springer.com)
  • Neurological
  • found that people admitted for hip fracture who also had a neurological condition (such as stroke or Parkinson disease) experienced a longer rehabilitation hospital stay compared with people without any accompanying neurological condition . (va.gov)
  • surgical
  • Currently there are no clearly-defined systemic or local therapies for the bone disease, and results of the use of conventional surgical treatment of sites of impending fracture have been universally disappointing. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • The circumference of its articular surface is slightly constricted and is termed the anatomical neck, in contradistinction to a constriction below the tubercles called the surgical neck which is frequently the seat of fracture. (wikipedia.org)
  • The surgical neck is a narrow area distal to the tubercles that is a common site of fracture. (wikipedia.org)
  • As well as its true anatomical neck, the constriction below the greater and lesser tubercles of the humerus is referred to as its surgical neck due to its tendency to fracture, thus often becoming the focus of surgeons. (wikipedia.org)
  • Abstract
  • Abstract - Fractures occur frequently in people living with stroke and have high personal, social, and economic costs for these individuals, their families, and the community. (va.gov)
  • tumors
  • offering comprehensive care for conditions ranging from brain tumors, aneurysms, pituitary tumors, to conditions of the spine including spinal tumors, disc herniations, and spinal fractures. (wikipedia.org)
  • body
  • As the upper part of the body is seperated by the most distance to the water, when the body is thrown hard into the water, these areas become subject to hard hits of the waters' surface. (prezi.com)
  • Although randomized controlled trials support the use of exercise to reduce fracture risk factors poststroke, the body of literature is small and further studies are required. (va.gov)
  • the lowest one, and the body of the bone for about 2.5 cm. below it, to the teres minor muscle. (wikipedia.org)
  • Its lips are called, respectively, the crests of the greater and lesser tubercles (bicipital ridges), and form the upper parts of the anterior and medial borders of the body of the bone. (wikipedia.org)
  • The radius has a body and two extremities. (wikipedia.org)
  • The body is cylindrical in its upper portion, and more prismatic below. (wikipedia.org)
  • lesions
  • Lesions in weight-bearing bones can lead to disabling fractures, while lesions in the skull can lead to compression of vital structures such as the cranial nerves. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Clinically, its manifestations range from isolated bone lesions to multisystem disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • Seen mostly in children, multifocal unisystem LCH is characterized by fever, bone lesions and diffuse eruptions, usually on the scalp and in the ear canals. (wikipedia.org)
  • The triad of diabetes insipidus, exopthalmos, and lytic bone lesions is known as the Hand-Schüller-Christian triad. (wikipedia.org)
  • Osteolytic lesions can lead to pathological fractures. (wikipedia.org)