• Gene
  • The terms chromosome and gene were used long before biologists really understood what these structures were. (encyclopedia.com)
  • The Watson and Crick discovery made it possible to express biological concepts (such as the gene) and structures (such as the chromosome) in concrete chemical terms. (encyclopedia.com)
  • allele one of multiple alternative forms of a single gene, each of which is a viable DNA sequence occupying a given position, or locus on a chromosome. (wikipedia.org)
  • Contents: Top 0-9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z canalisation candidate gene carrier centimorgan centriole centromere The part of a chromosome that links a pair of sister chromatids. (wikipedia.org)
  • The gene then needs to be mapped by comparing the inheritance of the phenotype with other known genetic markers. (wikipedia.org)
  • Epigenetics most often denotes changes in a chromosome that affect gene activity and expression, but can also be used to describe any heritable phenotypic change that does not derive from a modification of the genome, such as prions. (wikipedia.org)
  • genetics
  • It covers the latest in the various classical and modern techniques in the handling of chromosomes, karyotype analysis, genetics of meiosis, genomic relationships, and chromosome manipulation. (ebooks.com)
  • In classical genetics, Mendelian laws specify that the inheritance of traits passed from one generation to the next can only occur through sexual reproduction as information is passed down through the chromosomes of a species' germline cells (egg and sperm), and never through somatic (bodily) cells. (sott.net)
  • The Genetics Society of America (GSA), founded in 1931, is the professional membership organization for scientific researchers and educators in the field of genetics. (genetics.org)
  • traits
  • Replication of the genome is essential for inheritance of genetically determined traits. (nih.gov)
  • A consensus definition of the concept of epigenetic trait as "stably heritable phenotype resulting from changes in a chromosome without alterations in the DNA sequence" was formulated at a Cold Spring Harbor meeting in 2008, although alternate definitions that include non-heritable traits are still being used. (wikipedia.org)
  • Boveri
  • In a series of experiments beginning in the mid-1880s, Theodor Boveri gave the definitive demonstration that chromosomes are the vectors of heredity. (wikipedia.org)
  • Aided by the rediscovery at the start of the 1900s of Gregor Mendel's earlier work, Boveri was able to point out the connection between the rules of inheritance and the behaviour of the chromosomes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mendelian
  • In cases in which this has been thoroughly investigated, the sperm-delivered sequences have been seen to remain extrachromosomal and to be sexually transmitted to the next generation in a non-Mendelian fashion . (sott.net)
  • variations
  • The authors of the study pointed out that RNA of this kind has been found in mouse models to behave as a "transgenerational determinant of inheritable epigenetic variations and that spermatozoal RNA can carry and deliver information that cause phenotypic variations in the progeny. (sott.net)
  • cells
  • First observed chromosomes in microsporocytes (microspore mother cells) of Tradescantia . (studyadda.com)
  • In nature, yeast cells are found primarily on ripe fruits such as grapes (before maturation, grapes are almost free of yeasts). (wikipedia.org)
  • generations
  • The chromosomes are capable of self-reproduction and maintaining morphological and physiological properties through successive generations. (studyadda.com)
  • The impaired regulatory ability of TP5 persists for at least several generations after TP5 X chromosomes extracted from a long-term mutant Su(var)205 stock are made homozygous in the absence of the Su(var)205 mutation. (genetics.org)
  • plasmid
  • In 1907 a bacterium that caused plant tumors, Agrobacterium tumefaciens, had been discovered and in the early 1970s it was found that the bacteria inserted its DNA into plants using a Ti plasmid. (wikipedia.org)
  • regulation
  • Cytotype regulation of transposable P elements in the germ line of Drosophila melanogaster is associated with maternal transmission of P elements inserted at the left telomere of the X chromosome. (genetics.org)
  • Plants
  • The least number of chromosomes are found in Ascaris megalocephala i.e., 2 (\[n=2\]in Mucor hiemalis in plants ) while in a radiolarian protist ( Aulocantha ) has maximum number of chromosomes is 1600 ( Ophioglossum reticulatum , 2 n = 1262 in plants). (studyadda.com)
  • pairs
  • By inspection through the microscope, he counted 24 pairs, which would mean 48 chromosomes. (wikipedia.org)
  • The chromosomes of most bacteria, which some authors prefer to call genophores, can range in size from only 130,000 base pairs in the endosymbiotic bacteria Candidatus Hodgkinia cicadicola and Candidatus Tremblaya princeps, to more than 14,000,000 base pairs in the soil-dwelling bacterium Sorangium cellulosum. (wikipedia.org)