• West Bengal
  • Because of the low quantity of deep tubewells, the risk of arsenic poisoning in West Bengal is comparatively less. (wikipedia.org)
  • According to the World Health Organisation, "In Bangladesh, West Bengal (India), and some other areas most drinking-water used to be collected from open dug wells and ponds with little or no arsenic, but with contaminated water transmitting diseases such as diarrhoea, dysentery, typhoid, cholera, and hepatitis. (wikipedia.org)
  • People living in West Bengal could be exposing themselves to potentially cancer-causing arsenic by eating locally grown rice, British researchers said Tuesday. (medindia.net)
  • arsenicosis
  • Arsenicosis Cancers (lung, bladder, and skin) Cardiovascular disease Chronic kidney disease Neurobehavioral impairment Minamata disease Cerebellar ataxia Kidney and autoimmune dysfunction Acrodynia Dysarthria Arthritis Respiratory failure Neurological damage Leahy, Stephen (June 13, 2014). (wikipedia.org)
  • World Health Organ
  • About half of the wells in their study area of 35,000 people in the region of Araihazar contain arsenic at more than 50 parts per billion, five times the World Health Organization standard of 10. (sott.net)
  • The Bulletin of the World Health Organization estimates that the invisible taint of arsenic in the country's well water could now be responsible for as many as 43,000 deaths per year in the country. (sott.net)
  • She cited World Health Organization estimates that arsenic-contaminated water is a risk to as many as 450 million people in the Indo-Gangetic plain, a wide swath of South Asia that includes parts of Pakistan, India, Nepal and Bangladesh. (utdallas.edu)
  • effects of arsenic
  • Families that receive a filter are also given a supply of B-complex and multi-vitamin supplements to help reverse the effects of arsenic in the body - a process that can be accomplished in a year if begun early enough. (utdallas.edu)
  • element arsenic
  • He is working with the University of Chicago and Columbia University to study the effects of long-term exposure to the famously risky element arsenic. (sott.net)
  • A naturally occurring metallic element, arsenic was first discovered in the country's drinking water more than two decades ago. (sott.net)
  • RICHARDSON , Texas (Feb. 21, 2005) - A non-profit organization founded by a scientist at The University of Texas at Dallas (UTD) is helping improve the health of residents of remote villages in the Kingdom of Nepal through a grassroots effort to mitigate the presence of the poisonous element arsenic in the region's drinking water. (utdallas.edu)
  • gastrointestinal
  • Cold-Food Powder, an ancient Chinese drug containing realgar Zhang YN, Sun GX, Williams PN, Huang Q, Zhu YG (2011) Assessment of the solubility and bioaccessibility of arsenic in realgar wine using a simulated gastrointestinal system. (wikipedia.org)
  • Aluminum arsenide is poisonous if ingested and may cause gastrointestinal and skin effects and acute arsenic poisoning. (wikipedia.org)
  • It has been found to cause gastrointestinal inflammation which can be especially dangerous to young children. (izismile.com)
  • alloys
  • The main use of metallic Arsenic is to strengthen alloys such as copper and most of all lead, (a quick example of that is like car batteries). (carleton.edu)
  • The primary use of metallic arsenic is in alloys of lead (for example, in car batteries and ammunition). (wikipedia.org)
  • leading to elevated
  • doi:10.1016/j.scitotenv.2011.03.003 Zhang YN, Sun GX, Huang Q, Williams PN, Zhu YG (2011) A cultural practice of drinking realgar wine leading to elevated urinary arsenic and its potential health risk. (wikipedia.org)
  • humans
  • Arsenic can cause a range of serious health problems in humans, including cancer and diseases of the central nervous system, as well as problems with eyesight, breathing, digestion, the metabolism and the urinary system. (chinadialogue.net)
  • This is the first time such a response to prenatal arsenic exposure has been found in humans. (medindia.net)
  • Arsenic is caused by humans because they use it for industrial reasons. (carleton.edu)
  • Curated by the museum's social sciences departments, a selection of prominent historical artifacts are incorporated into the dioramas, revealing ways humans have imagined the presence of poisons. (wikipedia.org)
  • acute promyelo
  • In an accompanying commentary, Praveen Raju, at Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, notes that the data provide rationale for considering ATO as a therapy for cancers other than acute promyelocytic leukemia. (redorbit.com)
  • antimony
  • Like germanium, selenium, and bromine, which like arsenic succeed the 3d transition series, arsenic is much less stable in the group oxidation state of +5 than its vertical neighbors phosphorus and antimony, and hence arsenic pentoxide and arsenic acid are potent oxidizers. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1957, it was found by Chinese scientists that DMSA can effectively treat antimony poisoning due to overdose of tartar emetic. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bangladesh
  • The problem became serious health concern after mass poisoning of water in Bangladesh. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bangladesh is the most affected country by arsenic poisoning through drinking water. (wikipedia.org)
  • and other agencies like UNICEF installed wells to provide fresh water in underdeveloped areas of Bangladesh, but later on they found disease related to consumption of this water. (wikipedia.org)
  • The acceptable level as defined by WHO for maximum concentrations of arsenic in safe drinking water is 0.01 mg/L. The Bangladesh government's standard is a fivefold greater rate, with 0.05 mg/L being considered safe. (wikipedia.org)
  • cataracts
  • Arsenic poisoning is now known to cause cataracts. (telegraph.co.uk)
  • Arsenic, whether from medicine or other substances at the time, may lead to cataracts in younger people. (newsmax.com)
  • In some areas of the world, where there is arsenic in the drinking water, there is higher incidence of cataracts," he told Live Science. (newsmax.com)
  • Even The British Library researchers admit Austen's custom-made prescriptions may have just been picked "off the shelf" and had nothing to do with the development of cataracts and arsenic poisoning. (newsmax.com)
  • potent
  • These, in the words of the designers, are meant to show "the potent power of poison as a longstanding motif in fairy tales, legends, and children's stories. (wikipedia.org)
  • researchers
  • As part of our mission to eliminate cancer, MD Anderson researchers conduct hundreds of clinical trials to test new treatments for both common and rare cancers. (mdanderson.org)
  • Now, a team of researchers, led by Aykut à Šren, at Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, has generated data using human cancer cell lines that suggest that ATO might also be of benefit to individuals with certain brain tumors or connective tissue tumors. (redorbit.com)
  • Based on a design by researchers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology working in Nepal, the filter is made from a plastic bucket filled with sand, gravel, a basin of iron nails and other materials that trap the arsenic as water passes through. (utdallas.edu)
  • Researchers have found that the children of mothers whose water supplies were contaminated with arsenic during their pregnancies harboured gene expression changes that may lead to cancer and other diseases as they grow. (medindia.net)
  • mitigation
  • If they are properly sited in areas of greatest need, even a small increase in the rate of installing deep tube wells could bring arsenic poisoning to a virtual end in five to 10 years," says Peter Ravenscroft, a groundwater expert who has worked on the arsenic issue for more than two decades and is currently advising WHO and UNICEF on new arsenic mitigation guidelines. (sott.net)
  • The group's arsenic mitigation efforts have, Smith admitted, only begun to scratch the surface of a serious, widespread health problem. (utdallas.edu)
  • melanin
  • Moderate exposure to the sun contributes to the production of melanin and vitamin D by the body, but excessive exposure to ultraviolet rays has negative health effects, including sunburn and increased risk of skin cancer, as well as depressed immune system function and accelerated aging of the skin. (wikipedia.org)
  • UVA (see above) induces a cosmetic tan but little extra melanin protection against sun damage, sun burn, or cancer. (wikipedia.org)
  • pigmentation
  • As the poisoning develops, convulsions and changes in fingernail pigmentation called leukonychia striata (Mees's lines, or Aldrich-Mees's lines) may occur. (wikipedia.org)
  • Chronic exposure to aresenic can lead to dermatitis, mild pigmentation of the skin, vasospasticity, wart formation, decreased nerve conduction velocity, and lung cancer. (carleton.edu)
  • naturally
  • Arsenic, popularly known for killing rats, is a chemical element that occurs naturally in soil. (sun-sentinel.com)
  • But arsenic is a naturally occurring element and doctors and scientists like Nriagu are working hard to understand how arsenic affects us today. (michiganradionews.org)
  • Started on a shoestring a little more than a year ago by Dr. Linda S. S. Smith, a research scientist in UTD's Geosciences Department, the group, called Filters for Families, distributes low-cost - and in some cases, no-cost - filters designed to remove the naturally occurring arsenic that laces the area's well water. (utdallas.edu)
  • Cardiovascular disease Cerebrovascular disease Chronic Kidney disease Hemorrhagic stroke Hypertensive heart disorder Ischemic heart disease Ischemic stroke Neurological impairment Arsenic is a naturally occurring element and can be found in food, water, or air. (wikipedia.org)
  • phosphorus
  • Black arsenic is similar in structure to black phosphorus. (wikipedia.org)
  • Arsenic has a similar electronegativity and ionization energies to its lighter congener phosphorus and as such readily forms covalent molecules with most of the nonmetals. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2017
  • Contaminated Water Could Poison 60 Million in Pakistan in 2017 With 'Alarmingly High' Arsenic Levels. (wikipedia.org)
  • A recent report (Science, 2017) Shows more the investigation of 1200 samples was carried out and approximately more than 66% samples contained arsenic above WHO recommended limit. (wikipedia.org)
  • health
  • Programmes to provide 'safe' drinking-water over the past 30 years have helped to control these diseases, but in some areas they have had the unexpected side-effect of exposing the population to another health problem-arsenic. (wikipedia.org)
  • Health Hazards: Brain cancer, nerve-cell deterioration, and hyperactivity in children. (izismile.com)
  • Some of the risk to human health with arsenic is cancer to the lungs, stomach, and respiratory tract. (carleton.edu)
  • This is particularly notable with radioactive heavy metals such as radium, which imitates calcium to the point of being incorporated into human bone, although similar health implications are found in lead or mercury poisoning. (wikipedia.org)
  • Health Sciences Poison by Accident This section uses three large forced perspective dioramas to tell stories about poison's dangerous and mercurial nature. (wikipedia.org)
  • Poison as Cure The exhibit's finale takes guests through a diorama illustrating natural poisons that can ameliorate cancer, quinsy, laryngitis, croup, and other global health problems. (wikipedia.org)
  • skin
  • Is it true that only people with light skin get skin cancer? (cancer.gov)
  • It's more common among people with a light (fair) skin tone, but skin cancer can affect anyone. (cancer.gov)
  • Skin cancer can affect both men and women. (cancer.gov)
  • Even teenagers and, rarely, younger children can develop skin cancer. (cancer.gov)
  • How can people with dark skin get skin cancer? (cancer.gov)
  • Although dark skin does not burn in the sun as easily as fair skin, everyone is at risk for skin cancer. (cancer.gov)
  • Even people who don't burn are at risk for skin cancer. (cancer.gov)
  • You are at risk for skin cancer. (cancer.gov)
  • Also, the sun isn't the only cause of skin cancer. (cancer.gov)
  • That's why skin cancer may be found in places on the body never exposed to the sun. (cancer.gov)
  • How can I find skin cancer early? (cancer.gov)
  • When skin cancer is found early, it can be treated more easily. (cancer.gov)
  • What does skin cancer look like? (cancer.gov)
  • There are many different types of skin cancer (such as melanoma and basal cell skin cancer). (cancer.gov)
  • Also, skin cancer in people with dark skin often looks different from skin cancer in people with fair skin. (cancer.gov)
  • A change on the skin is the most common sign of skin cancer. (cancer.gov)
  • Skin cancer can look like a thick and jagged scar. (cancer.gov)
  • Sometimes skin cancer can look like a dark patch on your palm or the bottom of your foot. (cancer.gov)
  • Don't wait until the change looks like the more advanced skin cancers in these photos. (cancer.gov)
  • How can I protect myself from skin cancer? (cancer.gov)
  • Your doctor may take a sample of your skin to check for cancer cells. (cancer.gov)
  • Medicines or medical conditions (such as HIV) that suppress the immune system may make you more likely to develop skin cancer. (cancer.gov)
  • Anyone Can Get Skin Cancer-Learn How to Protect the Skin You're In! (cancer.gov)
  • Anyone Can Get Skin Cancer was originally published by the National Cancer Institute. (cancer.gov)
  • The author of "Pride and Prejudice" and "Sense and Sensibility" complained in letters about skin discoloration, a symptom of accumulation of arsenic in the body, as well as facial aches, fever and illness involving bile, The Washington Post reported . (newsmax.com)
  • Those drinking such water often exhibit signs of poisoning, including blackened palms due to the death of nerves and skin that sloughs off the soles of feet. (utdallas.edu)
  • Skin lesions and skin cancer are the most characteristic effects. (wikipedia.org)
  • cadmium
  • The relative activities of a series of novel monoalkyl esters of meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (MiADMSA) have been examined as agents for the mobilization of cadmium, lead and arsenic owing to the ability of these monoesters to cross cell membranes. (wikipedia.org)
  • commonly
  • On top of this, arsenic-laced chicken manure is commonly used to feed cows, spreading the substance to their meat as well. (izismile.com)
  • Arsenic is a common n-type dopant in semiconductor electronic devices, and the optoelectronic compound gallium arsenide is the second most commonly used semiconductor after doped silicon. (wikipedia.org)
  • lungs
  • A study of domestic fuel use by Taiyuan University of Science and Technology found that 50-80% of the floating particular matter released from domestic stoves is under 2.5 microns in diametre - small enough to enter the lungs and blood - and high in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, a human carcinogen. (chinadialogue.net)
  • people
  • One third of all cancers could be eliminated if people stopped smoking cigarettes. (mdanderson.org)
  • There was a big push to educate people about the dangers of arsenic poisoning around a decade ago, but in some places in Michigan, people still don't know much about it. (michiganradionews.org)
  • Some people also find that they have difficulty sleeping or concentrating. (www.nhs.uk)
  • Figures from the China Centre for Disease Control (CDC) show that endemic fluorosis due to coal-burning is found in 14 of China's provinces, affecting areas with a combined population of 33 million people. (chinadialogue.net)
  • People should seek medical testing for poisoning only if they are concerned for a particular reason, and physicians should consider a patient's history and physical examination before conducting tests to detect metals. (wikipedia.org)
  • Since the poisoning multiple studies have been done on the people who survived the milk poisoning incident. (wikipedia.org)
  • soil
  • Schmitt said arsenic in South Florida soil and groundwater is common. (sun-sentinel.com)
  • It's possible that there's some sort of arsenic being released from the soil," he said. (sun-sentinel.com)
  • She plans to continue her dual role as researcher, studying the effects of deforestation on arsenic in the soil, and aid worker, providing more filters to more families in more villages. (utdallas.edu)
  • Alot of the arsenic that is mined is mined out of gold mines and soil. (carleton.edu)
  • Fluoride is one of the most common found in drier climates where the geology favors release of fluoride ions to soil as the rocks decompose. (wikipedia.org)
  • Amoebiasis Buruli ulcer Campylobacter Cholera Cryptosporidiosis Cyclosporiasis Dracunculiasis (guinea-worm disease) Escherichia coli Fascioliasis Giardiasis Hepatitis Leptospirosis Norovirus Rotavirus Salmonella Schistosomiasis Shigellosis Typhoid fever Lymphatic filariasis Dermatophytosis (ringworm) Scabies Soil transmitted helminthiasis Trachoma Arboviral encephalitis Dengue fever Malaria Onchocerciasis Rift Valley fever Yellow fever Sources of lead poisoning/pollution include mining, smelting, manufacturing and recycling activities. (wikipedia.org)
  • lung cancer
  • After 10 years, your risk of lung cancer falls to about half that of a smoker. (www.nhs.uk)
  • Similarly, studies on workers exposed in copper foundries in the U.S., Japan and Sweden indicate a risk of lung cancer 6-10 times higher for the most exposed workers compared with the general population. (wikipedia.org)
  • He died of lung cancer at Fairview Hospital in Great Barrington, Massachusetts, at the age of 78. (wikipedia.org)
  • risk
  • Short-term effects include nausea, but chronic exposure raises the risk of developing several types of cancer. (sun-sentinel.com)
  • The Lyda Hill Cancer Prevention Center provides cancer risk assessment, screening and diagnostic services. (mdanderson.org)
  • The first author of the study Rebecca C. Fry said that the change in gene expression found in the exposed children are mostly, which can lead to increased cancer risk. (medindia.net)
  • The risk factors are undefined, except for rare inherited mutations in E-cadherin, which are found in about 50% of diffuse-type gastric carcinomas. (wikipedia.org)
  • mercury
  • DMSA was first synthesized by V. Nirenburg in the Urals Polytechnic Institute, commissioned by one of the electrical enterprises of Sverdlovsk, which consumed many tons of mercury and was looking for a medicine to prevent poisoning of personnel. (wikipedia.org)
  • Pronounced protective effect in animal poisoning with arsenic and mercury was first shown by I. Okonishnikova in 1962. (wikipedia.org)
  • Poisoning by lead and mercury has been know since antiquity. (wikipedia.org)
  • wells
  • The arsenic poses no danger to any residents, he said, and no private wells were impacted by the readings discovered at The Links at Boynton Beach , the public course at 8020 Jog Road. (sun-sentinel.com)
  • He said any explanation of why a few test wells revealed such high arsenic content would be speculation. (sun-sentinel.com)
  • The problem is the shallow wells, consisting of iron pipes driven by hand into the ground, which tap into groundwater containing arsenic being released from the sediment coming down from the Himalayas," Smith said. (utdallas.edu)
  • cause
  • Moreover, arsenic could cause oxidative stress by depleting the cell's antioxidants, especially the ones containing thiol groups. (wikipedia.org)
  • But he pointed out that arsenic as a cause is low on the list. (newsmax.com)
  • This fat substitute has been known to cause anal leakage and reduce the amount of vitamins found in the human body. (izismile.com)
  • The smoke that comes from tobacco contains a mixture of more than 7,000 chemicals, including over 60 known to cause cancer (carcinogens). (swedish.org)