• World Health Organ
  • About half of the wells in their study area of 35,000 people in the region of Araihazar contain arsenic at more than 50 parts per billion, five times the World Health Organization standard of 10. (sott.net)
  • The Bulletin of the World Health Organization estimates that the invisible taint of arsenic in the country's well water could now be responsible for as many as 43,000 deaths per year in the country. (sott.net)
  • She cited World Health Organization estimates that arsenic-contaminated water is a risk to as many as 450 million people in the Indo-Gangetic plain, a wide swath of South Asia that includes parts of Pakistan, India, Nepal and Bangladesh. (utdallas.edu)
  • element arsenic
  • He is working with the University of Chicago and Columbia University to study the effects of long-term exposure to the famously risky element arsenic. (sott.net)
  • A naturally occurring metallic element, arsenic was first discovered in the country's drinking water more than two decades ago. (sott.net)
  • RICHARDSON , Texas (Feb. 21, 2005) - A non-profit organization founded by a scientist at The University of Texas at Dallas (UTD) is helping improve the health of residents of remote villages in the Kingdom of Nepal through a grassroots effort to mitigate the presence of the poisonous element arsenic in the region's drinking water. (utdallas.edu)
  • cadmium
  • The relative activities of a series of novel monoalkyl esters of meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (MiADMSA) have been examined as agents for the mobilization of cadmium, lead and arsenic owing to the ability of these monoesters to cross cell membranes. (wikipedia.org)
  • acute promyelo
  • In an accompanying commentary, Praveen Raju, at Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, notes that the data provide rationale for considering ATO as a therapy for cancers other than acute promyelocytic leukemia. (redorbit.com)
  • cataracts
  • Arsenic poisoning is now known to cause cataracts. (telegraph.co.uk)
  • Arsenic, whether from medicine or other substances at the time, may lead to cataracts in younger people. (newsmax.com)
  • In some areas of the world, where there is arsenic in the drinking water, there is higher incidence of cataracts," he told Live Science. (newsmax.com)
  • Even The British Library researchers admit Austen's custom-made prescriptions may have just been picked "off the shelf" and had nothing to do with the development of cataracts and arsenic poisoning. (newsmax.com)
  • potent
  • These, in the words of the designers, are meant to show "the potent power of poison as a longstanding motif in fairy tales, legends, and children's stories. (wikipedia.org)
  • researchers
  • As part of our mission to eliminate cancer, MD Anderson researchers conduct hundreds of clinical trials to test new treatments for both common and rare cancers. (mdanderson.org)
  • Now, a team of researchers, led by Aykut à Šren, at Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, has generated data using human cancer cell lines that suggest that ATO might also be of benefit to individuals with certain brain tumors or connective tissue tumors. (redorbit.com)
  • Based on a design by researchers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology working in Nepal, the filter is made from a plastic bucket filled with sand, gravel, a basin of iron nails and other materials that trap the arsenic as water passes through. (utdallas.edu)
  • Researchers have found that the children of mothers whose water supplies were contaminated with arsenic during their pregnancies harboured gene expression changes that may lead to cancer and other diseases as they grow. (medindia.net)
  • mitigation
  • If they are properly sited in areas of greatest need, even a small increase in the rate of installing deep tube wells could bring arsenic poisoning to a virtual end in five to 10 years," says Peter Ravenscroft, a groundwater expert who has worked on the arsenic issue for more than two decades and is currently advising WHO and UNICEF on new arsenic mitigation guidelines. (sott.net)
  • The group's arsenic mitigation efforts have, Smith admitted, only begun to scratch the surface of a serious, widespread health problem. (utdallas.edu)
  • melanin
  • Moderate exposure to the sun contributes to the production of melanin and vitamin D by the body, but excessive exposure to ultraviolet rays has negative health effects, including sunburn and increased risk of skin cancer, as well as depressed immune system function and accelerated aging of the skin. (wikipedia.org)
  • UVA (see above) induces a cosmetic tan but little extra melanin protection against sun damage, sun burn, or cancer. (wikipedia.org)
  • pigmentation
  • As the poisoning develops, convulsions and changes in fingernail pigmentation called leukonychia striata (Mees's lines, or Aldrich-Mees's lines) may occur. (wikipedia.org)
  • naturally
  • Arsenic, popularly known for killing rats, is a chemical element that occurs naturally in soil. (sun-sentinel.com)
  • But arsenic is a naturally occurring element and doctors and scientists like Nriagu are working hard to understand how arsenic affects us today. (michiganradionews.org)
  • Started on a shoestring a little more than a year ago by Dr. Linda S. S. Smith, a research scientist in UTD's Geosciences Department, the group, called Filters for Families, distributes low-cost - and in some cases, no-cost - filters designed to remove the naturally occurring arsenic that laces the area's well water. (utdallas.edu)
  • Cardiovascular disease Cerebrovascular disease Chronic Kidney disease Hemorrhagic stroke Hypertensive heart disorder Ischemic heart disease Ischemic stroke Neurological impairment Arsenic is a naturally occurring element and can be found in food, water, or air. (wikipedia.org)
  • humans
  • Arsenic can cause a range of serious health problems in humans, including cancer and diseases of the central nervous system, as well as problems with eyesight, breathing, digestion, the metabolism and the urinary system. (chinadialogue.net)
  • This is the first time such a response to prenatal arsenic exposure has been found in humans. (medindia.net)
  • Curated by the museum's social sciences departments, a selection of prominent historical artifacts are incorporated into the dioramas, revealing ways humans have imagined the presence of poisons. (wikipedia.org)
  • phosphorus
  • Black arsenic is similar in structure to black phosphorus. (wikipedia.org)
  • Arsenic has a similar electronegativity and ionization energies to its lighter congener phosphorus and as such readily forms covalent molecules with most of the nonmetals. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2017
  • Contaminated Water Could Poison 60 Million in Pakistan in 2017 With 'Alarmingly High' Arsenic Levels. (wikipedia.org)
  • A recent report (Science, 2017) Shows more the investigation of 1200 samples was carried out and approximately more than 66% samples contained arsenic above WHO recommended limit. (wikipedia.org)
  • skin
  • Is it true that only people with light skin get skin cancer? (cancer.gov)
  • It's more common among people with a light (fair) skin tone, but skin cancer can affect anyone. (cancer.gov)
  • Skin cancer can affect both men and women. (cancer.gov)
  • Even teenagers and, rarely, younger children can develop skin cancer. (cancer.gov)
  • How can people with dark skin get skin cancer? (cancer.gov)
  • Although dark skin does not burn in the sun as easily as fair skin, everyone is at risk for skin cancer. (cancer.gov)
  • Even people who don't burn are at risk for skin cancer. (cancer.gov)
  • You are at risk for skin cancer. (cancer.gov)
  • Also, the sun isn't the only cause of skin cancer. (cancer.gov)
  • That's why skin cancer may be found in places on the body never exposed to the sun. (cancer.gov)
  • How can I find skin cancer early? (cancer.gov)
  • When skin cancer is found early, it can be treated more easily. (cancer.gov)
  • What does skin cancer look like? (cancer.gov)
  • There are many different types of skin cancer (such as melanoma and basal cell skin cancer). (cancer.gov)
  • Also, skin cancer in people with dark skin often looks different from skin cancer in people with fair skin. (cancer.gov)
  • A change on the skin is the most common sign of skin cancer. (cancer.gov)
  • Skin cancer can look like a thick and jagged scar. (cancer.gov)
  • Sometimes skin cancer can look like a dark patch on your palm or the bottom of your foot. (cancer.gov)
  • Don't wait until the change looks like the more advanced skin cancers in these photos. (cancer.gov)
  • How can I protect myself from skin cancer? (cancer.gov)
  • Your doctor may take a sample of your skin to check for cancer cells. (cancer.gov)
  • Medicines or medical conditions (such as HIV) that suppress the immune system may make you more likely to develop skin cancer. (cancer.gov)
  • Anyone Can Get Skin Cancer-Learn How to Protect the Skin You're In! (cancer.gov)
  • Anyone Can Get Skin Cancer was originally published by the National Cancer Institute. (cancer.gov)
  • The author of "Pride and Prejudice" and "Sense and Sensibility" complained in letters about skin discoloration, a symptom of accumulation of arsenic in the body, as well as facial aches, fever and illness involving bile, The Washington Post reported . (newsmax.com)
  • Those drinking such water often exhibit signs of poisoning, including blackened palms due to the death of nerves and skin that sloughs off the soles of feet. (utdallas.edu)
  • Skin lesions and skin cancer are the most characteristic effects. (wikipedia.org)
  • respiratory
  • Arsenic is related to heart disease (hypertension-related cardiovascular disease), cancer, stroke (cerebrovascular diseases), chronic lower respiratory diseases, and diabetes. (wikipedia.org)
  • According to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and American Cancer Society, tobacco use is responsible for more than 400,000 deaths each year due to cancer, respiratory illness, heart disease and other health problems. (chiroeco.com)
  • health
  • Programmes to provide 'safe' drinking-water over the past 30 years have helped to control these diseases, but in some areas they have had the unexpected side-effect of exposing the population to another health problem-arsenic. (wikipedia.org)
  • Health Hazards: Brain cancer, nerve-cell deterioration, and hyperactivity in children. (izismile.com)
  • Health Sciences Poison by Accident This section uses three large forced perspective dioramas to tell stories about poison's dangerous and mercurial nature. (wikipedia.org)
  • Poison as Cure The exhibit's finale takes guests through a diorama illustrating natural poisons that can ameliorate cancer, quinsy, laryngitis, croup, and other global health problems. (wikipedia.org)
  • water
  • Arsenic can be found in rice, apple juice, beer and wine, and drinking water. (michiganradionews.org)
  • Not every county in Michigan has the same regulations when it comes to testing well water for arsenic. (michiganradionews.org)
  • If you're on city water, your drinking water has to comply with a federal regulation that limits the amount of arsenic in it, but if you're on a private well, the federal and state governments do not limit the amount of arsenic in your well. (michiganradionews.org)
  • It is a high-profile problem due to the use of deep tubewells for water supply in the Ganges Delta, causing serious arsenic poisoning to large numbers of people. (wikipedia.org)
  • A 2007 study found that over 137 million people in more than 70 countries are probably affected by arsenic poisoning of drinking water. (wikipedia.org)
  • Arsenic contaminated water typically contains arsenous acid and arsenic acid or their derivatives. (wikipedia.org)
  • Arsenic acid tends to exist as the ions [HAsO− and [H2AsO in neutral water, whereas arsenous acid is not ionized. (wikipedia.org)
  • About 7-11 million wells or hand pumped wells are providing arsenic polluted water to local people. (wikipedia.org)
  • Estimation of Arsenic Intake from Drinking Water and Food (Raw and Cooked) in a Rural Village of Northern Chile. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, with over 8 million wells constructed, approximately one in five of these wells is now contaminated with arsenic above the government's drinking water standard. (wikipedia.org)
  • water deeper than 100 m is exposed to much older sediments which have already been depleted of arsenic. (wikipedia.org)
  • Arsenic may have also been found in a tainted water supply. (newsmax.com)
  • Found in: Drinking water, crops. (izismile.com)
  • But it is not entirely unexpected, Samson explains, because "in mice, when mothers are transiently exposed to arsenic in the drinking water, their progeny, in their adult life, are much more cancer-prone," Samson added. (medindia.net)
  • There are many other diseases likely to have been caused by common anions found in natural drinking water. (wikipedia.org)
  • commonly
  • On top of this, arsenic-laced chicken manure is commonly used to feed cows, spreading the substance to their meat as well. (izismile.com)
  • Arsenic is a common n-type dopant in semiconductor electronic devices, and the optoelectronic compound gallium arsenide is the second most commonly used semiconductor after doped silicon. (wikipedia.org)
  • people
  • One third of all cancers could be eliminated if people stopped smoking cigarettes. (mdanderson.org)
  • There was a big push to educate people about the dangers of arsenic poisoning around a decade ago, but in some places in Michigan, people still don't know much about it. (michiganradionews.org)
  • Some people also find that they have difficulty sleeping or concentrating. (www.nhs.uk)
  • Figures from the China Centre for Disease Control (CDC) show that endemic fluorosis due to coal-burning is found in 14 of China's provinces, affecting areas with a combined population of 33 million people. (chinadialogue.net)
  • Since the poisoning multiple studies have been done on the people who survived the milk poisoning incident. (wikipedia.org)
  • wells
  • The arsenic poses no danger to any residents, he said, and no private wells were impacted by the readings discovered at The Links at Boynton Beach , the public course at 8020 Jog Road. (sun-sentinel.com)
  • He said any explanation of why a few test wells revealed such high arsenic content would be speculation. (sun-sentinel.com)
  • The problem is the shallow wells, consisting of iron pipes driven by hand into the ground, which tap into groundwater containing arsenic being released from the sediment coming down from the Himalayas," Smith said. (utdallas.edu)
  • cause
  • Moreover, arsenic could cause oxidative stress by depleting the cell's antioxidants, especially the ones containing thiol groups. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cigarette smoking is also the number one cause of cancer deaths in men. (chiroeco.com)
  • But he pointed out that arsenic as a cause is low on the list. (newsmax.com)
  • This fat substitute has been known to cause anal leakage and reduce the amount of vitamins found in the human body. (izismile.com)
  • The smoke that comes from tobacco contains a mixture of more than 7,000 chemicals, including over 60 known to cause cancer (carcinogens). (swedish.org)
  • DMSA
  • The use of DMSA is not approved for prevention of lead poisoning in anticipation of exposure in known lead contaminated environments. (wikipedia.org)
  • DMSA was first synthesized by V. Nirenburg in the Urals Polytechnic Institute, commissioned by one of the electrical enterprises of Sverdlovsk, which consumed many tons of mercury and was looking for a medicine to prevent poisoning of personnel. (wikipedia.org)
  • household cleaners
  • Stress, physical and mental abuse, diet, exposure to toxins, pathogens, radiation, and chemicals found in almost all personal care products and household cleaners are possible causes of a large segment of non-hereditary disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • acids
  • Their names as "acids" is a formality, these species are not aggressive acids but are merely the soluble forms of arsenic near neutral pH. (wikipedia.org)
  • known
  • Certain cancers, in particular brain tumors known as medulloblastomas and connective tissue tumors known as Ewing sarcoma, are characterized by inappropriate activation of a signaling pathway known as the Hh/GLI1 signaling pathway. (redorbit.com)
  • Linitis plastica, also known as Brinton's disease or leather bottle stomach, is a morphological variant of diffuse (or infiltrating) stomach cancer. (wikipedia.org)
  • villages
  • They found 900 villages with arsenic above the government limit. (wikipedia.org)
  • She plans to continue her dual role as researcher, studying the effects of deforestation on arsenic in the soil, and aid worker, providing more filters to more families in more villages. (utdallas.edu)
  • oxide
  • In some parts of Sri Lanka iodine deficiency has also been noted which has been identified as a result of iodine fixation by hydrated iron oxide found in lateritic soils in wet coastal lowlands. (wikipedia.org)
  • risk
  • Short-term effects include nausea, but chronic exposure raises the risk of developing several types of cancer. (sun-sentinel.com)
  • The Lyda Hill Cancer Prevention Center provides cancer risk assessment, screening and diagnostic services. (mdanderson.org)
  • The first author of the study Rebecca C. Fry said that the change in gene expression found in the exposed children are mostly, which can lead to increased cancer risk. (medindia.net)
  • The risk factors are undefined, except for rare inherited mutations in E-cadherin, which are found in about 50% of diffuse-type gastric carcinomas. (wikipedia.org)