• Chiroptera
  • Display song of parti-coloured bat Vespertilio murinus Linnaeus, 1758 (Chiroptera, Mammalia) in southern Slovenia and preliminary study of its variability" (PDF). (wikipedia.org)
  • wings
  • Soaring: gliding in rising or otherwise moving air that requires specific physiological and morphological adaptations that can sustain the animal aloft without flapping its wings. (wikipedia.org)
  • The non-flying penguins have wings adapted for use under water and use the same wing movements for swimming that most other birds use for flight. (thefullwiki.org)
  • the shape of the wings of the airplane are designed specially for the type of flight desired. (thefullwiki.org)
  • As with sustained flight, gliding generally requires the application of an airfoil, such as the wings on aircraft or birds, or the gliding membrane of a gliding possum. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, some aircraft with lifting bodies and animals such as the flying snake can achieve gliding flight without any wings by creating a flattened surface underneath. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, given the three-dimensional complexities of flapping wings, it is possible that the associated vortex wakes generated during ground effect for animals differ from those predicted theoretically. (royalsocietypublishing.org)
  • Many people look at the results in the animal flight literature for understanding how robotic wings could be designed better," says Lentink. (futurity.org)
  • An ornithopter (from Greek ornithos "bird" and pteron "wing") is an aircraft that flies by flapping its wings. (wikipedia.org)
  • and its forelimbs modified into wings wings, flight organs of the bird, the bat, and the insect. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • The wings of the bird-inspired model consist of an elastic membrane. (biologists.org)
  • roost
  • Spectral bats usually roost in a hollow tree with a mate and their young of the year. (wikipedia.org)
  • The little brown bat lives in three different roosting sites: day roosts, night roost and hibernation roosts. (wikipedia.org)
  • Backyard bat boxes are becoming increasingly popular ways to coexist with bats and gain the benefit of their hunting and fertilization skills, without the drawback of having them roost where they are unwanted. (valleyforge.org)
  • glide
  • The design of all three types enables them to repeatedly climb using rising air and then to glide before finding the next source of lift. (wikipedia.org)
  • For similar reasons to birds, bats can glide efficiently. (wikipedia.org)
  • The patagium of a bat has four distinct parts: Propatagium: the patagium present from the neck to the first digit Dactylopatagium: the portion found within the digits Plagiopatagium: the portion found between the last digit and the hindlimbs Uropatagium: the posterior portion of the body between the two hindlimbs Other mammals such as gliding possums and flying squirrels also glide using a patagium, but with much poorer efficiency than bats. (wikipedia.org)
  • In addition to mammals and birds, other animals notably flying fish, flying snakes, flying frogs and flying squid also glide. (wikipedia.org)
  • They are not capable of flight in the same way as birds or bats but are able to glide from one tree to another with the aid of a patagium, a furry, parachute-like membrane that stretches from wrist to ankle. (wikipedia.org)
  • These mammals can glide through the trees, but they do not actually fly (like birds and bats). (wikipedia.org)
  • They had the maneuverability of a bat, but could glide like an albatross. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some early manned flight attempts may have been intended to achieve flapping-wing flight, though probably only a glide was actually achieved. (wikipedia.org)
  • reptiles
  • Tetrapods can be defined in cladistics as the nearest common ancestor of all living amphibians (the lissamphibians) and all living amniotes (reptiles, birds, and mammals), along with all of the descendants of that ancestor. (wikipedia.org)
  • The term tetrapodomorph is used for the stem-based definition: any animal that is more closely related to living amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals than to living dipnoi (lungfishes). (wikipedia.org)
  • Batrachomorphs are all animals sharing a more recent common ancestry with living amphibians than with living amniotes (reptiles, birds, and mammals). (wikipedia.org)
  • Large mammals like elk and smaller animals such as raccoons, coyotes, and voles frequent these units, which are also populated by a wide variety of reptiles, fish, butterflies, and other creatures adapted to particular niches of a mountainous semi-desert terrain. (wikipedia.org)
  • typically
  • These modes of locomotion typically require an animal start from a raised location, converting that potential energy into kinetic energy and using aerodynamic forces to control trajectory and angle of descent. (wikipedia.org)
  • The flights of flying fish are typically around 50 meters (160 ft), though they can use updrafts at the leading edge of waves to cover distances of up to 400 m (1,300 ft). (wikipedia.org)
  • These bats are typically found roosting, usually on tree branches, but sometimes in hollow trees or even man-made structures, in dense, lowland neotropical forests, below an elevation of 1,650 m (5,410 ft). (wikipedia.org)
  • Adult bats are typically 6-10 cm (2.4-3.9 in) long and weigh 5-14 grams (0.2-0.5 oz). (wikipedia.org)
  • It's projected that bats typically sa ve U.S. farmers $74 per acre,' Navarino says, 'because bats are eating bugs. (valleyforge.org)
  • hunt
  • Like most bats, they use both echolocation and sight to hunt, but it also hypothesized that they use their sense of smell. (wikipedia.org)
  • Spectral bats usually hunt several times a night and, during the breeding season, the male will hunt for food alone and bring food back to the female and their young. (wikipedia.org)
  • The news articles claim the snakes hunt in 'packs,' which to me connotes a social animal (e.g. wolves) hunting together and sharing a kill. (fieldherpforum.com)
  • This significantly improves the effectiveness of the hunt, apparently because they can most effectively block the prey's flight path and easily intercept passing bats. (fieldherpforum.com)
  • Photo hunt game (Spot the difference) with backdrop of animals pictues in their natural habitat around the world. (apple.com)
  • humans
  • This book tackles a number of different perspectives concerning the parasitic helminth Ascaris, both in animals and in humans and the disease known as ascariasis. (stanford.edu)
  • Humans, although not apparently other animals, have managed to construct lighter than air vehicles that fly due to their buoyancy in air. (thefullwiki.org)
  • they feed on small animals from the sea bottom and pose no danger to humans, unless provoked (although they are so big that they have hurt, and even killed, people unintentionally by leaping out of the water and landing on boats! (blogspot.com)
  • Brown bats have been found in Iceland, Alaska, and Kamchatka, likely due to accidental ship transportation by humans. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, there are two diseases carried by bats that may be transmitted to humans. (naturalsciences.org)
  • frogs
  • Several witnesses of raining frogs describe the animals as startled but healthy, and exhibiting relatively normal behavior shortly after the event. (wikipedia.org)
  • limbs
  • The animal launches itself from a tree, spreading its limbs to expose the gliding membranes, usually to get from tree to tree in rainforests as an efficient means of both locating food and evading predators. (wikipedia.org)
  • The direction and speed of the animal in midair are varied by changing the positions of its limbs, largely controlled by small cartilaginous wrist bones. (wikipedia.org)
  • adult
  • Female bats live in small groups, of about 50 animals, sometimes up to several hundred adult females. (wikipedia.org)
  • According to early descriptions, it could grow up to 4.5 meters (14′ 8″) long, but today, enormous individuals like these are seldom found and most adult arapaimas average 2 meters (6′ 6″) long. (blogspot.com)
  • Subspecies dacotiae is quite rare, numbering less than 1000 adult birds in 1990, when the ancient western Canarian subspecies canariensis numbered about ten times as many birds. (wikipedia.org)
  • doves
  • The giant cactus is dependent upon pollinators, now mostly bees [or white-winged doves] but traditionally bats. (icr.org)
  • genus
  • However, another study published in 2007 by Unwin and Martill found that T. navigans, previously assigned to Tapejara, was actually most closely related to T. imperator and belonged with it in a new genus separate from Tapejara. (wikipedia.org)
  • pheasant pheasant, common name for some members of a family (Phasianidae) of henlike birds related to the grouse and including the Old World partridge, the peacock, various domestic and jungle fowls, and the true pheasants (genus Phasianus ). (thefreedictionary.com)
  • avian
  • The identification of these specimens as avian would push back the origin of birds by at least 75 million years. (wikipedia.org)
  • Simplifying the complicated locomotion kinematics to a sinusoidal wing rotation about two axes, the main features of dynamic avian flight were approximated. (biologists.org)
  • small
  • Very small animals may be carried up by the wind. (wikipedia.org)
  • Broili claimed to have found a two millimeter tall crest made of thin bone that ran much of the skull's length in one Rhamphorhynchus specimen, evidenced by an impression in the surrounding rock and a few small fragments of the crest itself. (wikipedia.org)
  • Jobert in 1871 used a rubber band to power a small model bird. (wikipedia.org)
  • This hypothesis appears supported by the type of animals in these rains: small and light, usually aquatic, and by the suggestion that the rain of animals is often preceded by a storm. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bats may enter houses through ungrated chimneys, small openings around plumbing, or any crack at least ¼ inch by 1½ inches. (naturalsciences.org)
  • Instead of a discrete vortex gait, double-ringed wakes were found for small flow velocities. (biologists.org)
  • relatively
  • In comparison with rotor aircraft, relatively little is known about the vortex wake for animals hovering in ground effect. (royalsocietypublishing.org)
  • Scientists used to think that relatively shorter genomes were associated with flight . (nbcnews.com)
  • Past measurements had been taken a few wingbeats behind the animal, and predicted that the animal-generated vortices remain relatively frozen over time, like airplane contrails before they dissipate. (futurity.org)
  • Found in relatively deep waters, these animals are sometimes called slime eels, but they are not really eels, and actually, they may not even be fish at all, according to some scientists. (blogspot.com)
  • Under this hypothesis, a tornadic waterspout transports animals to relatively high altitudes, carrying them over large distances. (wikipedia.org)
  • unlike
  • Ornithologists have discovered that the whippoorwill, unlike other birds, hibernates during the winter instead of migrating. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Gliding
  • The patagium is a membranous structure that assists an animal in gliding or flight. (wikipedia.org)
  • A number of animals have evolved aerial locomotion, either by powered flight or by gliding. (wikipedia.org)
  • Gliding, in particular, has evolved among rainforest animals, especially in the rainforests in Asia (most especially Borneo) where the trees are tall and widely spaced. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some gliding animals may use their gliding membranes for drag rather than lift, to safely descend. (wikipedia.org)
  • Gliding flight: falling at an angle less than 45° from the horizontal with lift from adapted aerofoil membranes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Gliding animals have a lower aspect ratio (wing length/breadth) than true flyers. (wikipedia.org)
  • While gliding occurs independently from powered flight, it has some ecological advantages of its own. (wikipedia.org)
  • Worldwide, the distribution of gliding animals is uneven as most inhabit rain forests in Southeast Asia. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is employed by gliding animals and by aircraft such as gliders. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although the human application of gliding flight usually refers to aircraft designed for this purpose, most powered aircraft are capable of gliding without engine power. (wikipedia.org)
  • See list List of airline flights that required gliding flight. (wikipedia.org)
  • Birds in particular use gliding flight to minimise their use of energy. (wikipedia.org)
  • Large birds are notably adept at gliding, including: Albatross Condor Vulture Eagle Stork Frigatebird Like recreational aircraft, birds can alternate periods of gliding with periods of soaring in rising air, and so spend a considerable time airborne with a minimal expenditure of energy. (wikipedia.org)
  • Yet the gliding mechanism of flying squirrels involves structures and techniques during flight that allow for great stability and control. (wikipedia.org)
  • seeds
  • Fruit-eating bats are one of several animals that consume ripe fruits without destroying seeds. (icr.org)
  • 3 For example, in Africa's Ivory Coast bats digestively "plant" fruit seeds. (icr.org)
  • However, research shows that seed-sowing birds routinely avoid open areas, preferring the safety of trees, so 95% of the fig seeds dropped in open areas come from fig-eating bats. (icr.org)
  • 3 Frugivorous bats drop a lot of seeds. (icr.org)
  • Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 135-136 (bats pollinating Sonoran Desert cacti), 222-223 (fig-eating bats dispersing seeds in Lamto, Ivory Coast). (icr.org)
  • several
  • Bats have been known in different cultures for several thousand centuries, however their nocturnal activities have made them mysterious and led to many legends and myths, while proven facts remained scarce. (stanford.edu)
  • The great frigatebird in particular is capable of continuous flights up to several weeks. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Herald's cover story claimed that there had been a mass escape of animals from the Central Park Zoo and several people had been killed by the free-roaming beasts. (wikipedia.org)
  • A rhinoceros was said to be the first escapee, goring his keeper to death and setting into motion the escape of other animals, including a polar bear, a panther, a Numidian lion, several hyenas, and a Bengal tiger. (wikipedia.org)
  • I would lean towards that several animals found a good hunting ground, that's best at a certain time, and do have some natural selection predisposition for giving space to other hunters. (fieldherpforum.com)
  • nectar
  • In zoology, a nectarivore is an animal which derives its energy and nutrient requirements from a diet consisting mainly or exclusively of the sugar-rich nectar produced by flowering plants. (wikipedia.org)
  • Flowers often have specialized structures that make the nectar accessible only for animals possessing appropriate morphological structures, and there are numerous examples of coevolution between nectarivores and the flowers they pollinate. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bats, meanwhile, visit open flowers where the nectar is not as deeply hidden. (wikipedia.org)
  • To maintain flight a bird must rapidly excrete much of the water content of the nectar it consumes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bats provide pollinating services in deserts and elsewhere while acquiring nectar from cactus flower blossoms. (icr.org)
  • patagium
  • The patagium of a bat has four distinct parts: Propatagium: the patagium present from the neck to the first digit. (wikipedia.org)
  • A patagium has been found in the dinosaur Psittacosaurus, and ran from the animal's ankle to the base of the tail. (wikipedia.org)
  • dinosaur
  • Due to an extraordinary fossil, we know that gigantic, prehistoric sawfish were probably a staple food for the largest carnivorous dinosaur, Spinosaurus, as a vertebra from the fish was found stuck between the dinosaur's teeth. (blogspot.com)
  • Indeed, the inclusion of birds in the dinosaur family tree, although accepted by most paleontologists, is debated by some. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • agility
  • The large, thin rudder-like sail on its head functioned as a sensory organ that acted similarly to a flight computer in a modern-day aircraft and also helped with the animal's turning agility. (wikipedia.org)
  • Nothing alive today compares to the performance and agility of these animals. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bats that ha ve the agility to track a flittering bug certainly ha ve the wherewithal to avoid getting tangled in someone's hair. (valleyforge.org)
  • specimens
  • Although fragmentary fossil remains possibly belonging to Rhamphorhynchus have been found in England, Tanzania, and Spain, the best preserved specimens come from the Solnhofen limestone of Bavaria, Germany. (wikipedia.org)
  • Most specimens from the northern edge of its range are males although nursery roosts have been found in the Yukon. (wikipedia.org)
  • aerodynamics
  • In unpowered modes of locomotion, the animal uses aerodynamics forces exerted on the body due to wind or falling through the air. (wikipedia.org)
  • In view of the complexity of wing-beat kinematics, numerical studies of bird aerodynamics are limited. (biologists.org)
  • Flying
  • Modelling the flying bird. (wikipedia.org)
  • The longest recorded flight of a flying fish was 45 seconds. (thefullwiki.org)
  • This mode of flight involves flying a significant distance horizontally compared to its descent and therefore can be distinguished from a mostly straight downward descent like with a round parachute. (wikipedia.org)
  • These advantages would be expected to be maximal for hovering, based on the associated power savings experimentally found for helicopters flying close to the ground [ 1 , 2 , 5 ]. (royalsocietypublishing.org)
  • These studies found support that flying squirrels originated 18-20 million years ago, are monophyletic, and have a sister relationship with tree squirrels. (wikipedia.org)
  • The results, from the lab of mechanical engineer David Lentink, help explain the way animals generate enough lift to fly and could have implications for how flying robots and drones are designed. (futurity.org)
  • The goal of our study was to compare very commonly used models in the literature to figure out how much lift a bird, or other flying animal, generates based off its wake," says graduate student and coauthor Diana Chin. (futurity.org)
  • Scientists rely on these models, developed to interpret the airflow generated by flying animals, to understand how animals support their weight during flight. (futurity.org)
  • The results are resources for work on flying robots and drones inspired by the biology of these animals. (futurity.org)
  • Those particles swirling off Obi's wingtips created the clearest picture to date of the wake left by a flying animal. (futurity.org)
  • This research highlights challenges in developing flying robots based on what's known about animal flight. (futurity.org)
  • They were the dominant flying animals of their time. (wikipedia.org)
  • If the bat is flying around, close all doors to the room to isolate the bat in one room. (naturalsciences.org)
  • In the last few decades, there have been growing efforts and successes in describing the wake configuration of flying birds using theoretical models and experimental visualization techniques. (biologists.org)
  • Anyone watching a bat fly may falsely assume it is ill based solely on the way it is flying. (valleyforge.org)
  • The reason bats fly like that instead of the steady flight of a bird is because bats are flying after bugs. (valleyforge.org)
  • glider
  • Frenchman Jean-Marie Le Bris accomplished the world's first powered flight in 1856 , with a glider that was pulled behind a running horse ? (thefullwiki.org)
  • Around 1894, Otto Lilienthal, an aviation pioneer, became famous in Germany for his widely publicized and successful glider flights. (wikipedia.org)
  • catches
  • Brown bats do not claim feeding areas like a territory, however individuals frequently return to the same feeding sites where they have previously made successful catches. (wikipedia.org)
  • organ
  • Birds just inherit that character like they have inherited other dinosaurian traits, like feathers," Organ told LiveScience. (nbcnews.com)
  • habitat
  • Its natural habitat is mountains, steppes and forested areas, but in Western Europe, they can mainly be found in cities. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is a diurnal animal of the lowlands and prefers open habitat such as fields, heaths, shrubland and marshland. (wikipedia.org)
  • The ground is not normal habitat for bats. (naturalsciences.org)
  • groups
  • In Western Europe, male groups consist of about 250 animals and are found only during the spring and early summer. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some other bird groups have one or more similar specializations-For instance, the Lories, one group of Australasian parrots within the larger parrot family Psittacidae, possess similar digestive modifications. (wikipedia.org)
  • Birds are one of only four taxonomic groups to have evolved powered flight . (wikipedia.org)
  • Feathers grow only along certain definite tracts (pterylae), which vary in different groups of birds. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • common
  • goatsucker Common name for various large-mouthed, nocturnal birds of the order Caprimulgiformes. (encyclopedia.com)
  • The common kestrel readily adapts to human settlement, as long as sufficient swathes of vegetation are available, and may even be found in wetlands, moorlands and arid savanna. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is common for birds to become disoriented (for example, because of bad weather or fireworks) and collide with objects such as trees or buildings, killing them or stunning them into falling to their death. (wikipedia.org)
  • The event in Beebe, however, captured the imagination and led to more reports in the media of birds falling from the sky across the globe, such as in Sweden and Italy, though many scientists claim such mass deaths are common occurrences but usually go unnoticed. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although H. capsulatum is found in bat guano, it is more common in droppings of poultry and pigeons. (naturalsciences.org)
  • The game birds hunted for food and sport include grouse grouse, common name for a game bird of the colder parts of the Northern Hemisphere. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • known
  • The change from a body plan for breathing and navigating in water to a body plan enabling the animal to move on land is one of the most profound evolutionary changes known. (wikipedia.org)
  • There is not much known about the behaviour of parti-coloured bats, as they are quite rare. (wikipedia.org)
  • Archaeornithura, which dates to the Cretaceous period, is one of the earliest known ancestors of modern birds and resembles a modern wading bird. (thefreedictionary.com)