• PBDEs
  • And, even though children are among those most at risk from PBDEs' ability to disrupt and harm development, products intended for kids and babies are also those most likely to be doused in flame-retardant chemicals . (mercola.com)
  • We found maternal exposure to PBDEs, a group of brominated flame retardants mostly withdrawn from the U.S. market in 2004, was associated with deficits in child cognition at age 5 years and hyperactivity at ages 2-5 years," Dr. Chen said. (aap.org)
  • Even though PBDEs, except Deca-BDEs, are not used as a flame retardant in the United States anymore, they are found on many consumer products bought several years ago. (aap.org)
  • Zota
  • Since this is the first study to examine the effects of organophosphate flame retardants on female reproduction, it is unclear how these findings would apply to the general population of reproductive-aged women," said Ami Zota, an environmental and occupational health researcher at the Milken Institute School of Public Health at George Washington University. (reuters.com)
  • Women may be able to reduce their chemical exposures in the indoor environment by washing their hands frequently, especially prior to eating, as well as buying flame-retardant-free furniture," Zota advised. (reuters.com)
  • I am concerned by the rise in use and diversity of flame retardants on the market because we have very little information on their toxicity and potential effects on the general population, particularly vulnerable subpopulations such as pregnant women and young children,' said Ami Zota, who studies flame retardants and reproductive health at the University of California, San Francisco. (scientificamerican.com)
  • developmental
  • But if that rule is changed as proposed, fire-safety standards can be met without using flame retardants, which have been linked to cancer, developmental problems and impaired fertility. (latimes.com)
  • Various retardants have been linked to cancer, neurological and developmental problems, infertility and thyroid disruption. (latimes.com)
  • resins
  • It has been used as a flame retardant for a variety of materials, including electronic equipment, PVC, hydraulic fluids, glues, in nail polishes, and casting resins. (wikipedia.org)
  • California
  • Under a current California rule, known as Technical Bulletin 117, foam cushioning must withstand a candle-like flame for 12 seconds, a standard that many manufacturers meet by adding flame retardants to products sold across the country. (latimes.com)
  • Some types of flame retardants have been banned in Europe and California because of health concerns . (ewg.org)
  • California passed a law in the mid-1970s requiring furniture to resist ignition for 12 seconds in tests with open flames and smoldering cigarettes. (slate.com)
  • More furniture appears to be treated with flame retardants today than, say, 15 years ago,' said Heather Stapleton, an environmental chemist at Duke University and lead author of the project, which also included researchers from the University of California, Berkeley and Boston University. (scientificamerican.com)
  • In a separate study also published today, researchers found that dust in California homes is contaminated with levels of flame retardants that exceed health risk guidelines developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. (scientificamerican.com)
  • Because the market in California is so large, much of the nation's furniture is manufactured with flame retardants to meet that standard. (scientificamerican.com)
  • concentrations
  • Reuters Health) - Women with high concentrations of common flame retardants in their urine may have a hard time getting pregnant and carrying a baby to term, a recent study suggests. (reuters.com)
  • alternatives
  • They also add to the body of evidence indicating a need to reduce the use of these flame retardants and identify safer alternatives," Carignan, now at the Center for Research on Ingredient Safety at Michigan State University in East Lansing, said by email. (reuters.com)
  • retardancy
  • The basic mechanisms of flame retardancy vary depending on the specific flame retardant and the substrate. (wikipedia.org)
  • A method for improving the flame retardancy of a silicone rubber is shown in U.S. Pat. (google.com)
  • where a platinum compound or platinum is combined with other components of a silicone rubber to impart flame retardancy. (google.com)
  • While the addition of platinum or platinum compound does improve the flame retardancy of silicone rubbers and is entirely adequate for most uses, the rubbers produced according to the Nobel et al. (google.com)
  • SUMMARY In accordance with the present invention, it-has been discovered that by incorporating a small amount of a Group II metal oxide, preferably zinc oxide, in combination with a platinum compound or platinum in a filled silicone rubber composition that the flame retardancy of the silicone rubber is markedly improved. (google.com)
  • products
  • Certain new non halogenated products, with these reactive and non emissive characteristics have been coming onto the market since 2010, because of the public debate about flame retardant emissions. (wikipedia.org)
  • She also said companies are not required to label products containing flame-retardants. (redorbit.com)
  • Gordon Nelson, a professor of chemistry at the Florida Institute of Technology, told USA Today that some of the baby products tested were purchased in 2002, which was before PentaBDA, a common flame-retardant, was phased out. (redorbit.com)
  • OLYMPIA, Wash. (AP) -- The state Senate passed a bill Wednesday that would ban two carcinogenic flame retardants in car seats, strollers and other products made for young children. (yahoo.com)
  • Unlike the House bill, the Senate version doesn't include banning the two retardants from sofas and other upholstered household products. (yahoo.com)
  • It is used as a plasticizer and a fire retardant in a wide variety of settings and products. (wikipedia.org)
  • furniture
  • Why are flame retardants required in furniture, anyway? (slate.com)
  • Wasn't Ikea the company with the long corporate reports about tree planting and forward-thinking policies on hazardous materials-and one of the first major retailers to discontinue the use of brominated flame retardants in furniture? (slate.com)
  • Because national furniture makers want to sell to Californians, we're all sitting on flame retardants whichever state we live in. (slate.com)
  • Flame retardants in U.S. furniture are on the rise, with a new study finding them in nearly all couches tested. (scientificamerican.com)
  • Whether there are health risks from many of the newer flame retardants, however, is largely unknown, and most furniture does not carry labels that provide information to consumers. (scientificamerican.com)
  • A spokesperson from the American Chemistry Council, which represents flame retardant manufacturers, said "this study confirms what we would expect to find: Furniture manufacturers use approved flame retardants to meet established fire safety standards, which help save lives. (scientificamerican.com)
  • spokesperson
  • Bryan Goodman, a spokesperson for the North American Flame Retardant Alliance, said because these regulations help promote public safety "there is a need for international, national and regional code consistency. (cnn.com)
  • thermal
  • A way to stop spreading of the flame over the material is to create a thermal insulation barrier between the burning and unburned parts. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, once there is a potential thermal runaway, the flame retardant will be activated and nip the fire or explosion in the bud. (ubergizmo.com)
  • Its mechanism of action as a flame retardant is as follows: first, during thermal decomposition, phosphoric acid is formed. (wikipedia.org)
  • organic
  • Funded by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), this region-wide effort has produced a large body of data on a wide range of persistent organic pollutants, including flame retardants, in marine mammals and fish that has placed the region in a global perspective. (wikipedia.org)
  • group
  • Flame retardants are well-studied and provide important fire safety benefits in homes, cars and public areas," the American Chemistry Council, an industry group, said in a statement to USA Today's Liz Szabo. (redorbit.com)