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  • brachial
  • A computed tomogram was performed, revealing a subclavian artery pseudoaneurysm that compressed the brachial plexus ( Figs. 1 A to 1 D). A few days later, an endovascular covered self-expanding stent was successfully placed, excluding the pseudoaneurysm ( Figs. 1 E to 1 H). Chest pain disappeared, and the patient was discharged uneventfully. (onlinejacc.org)
  • Blood pressure readings on legs are often 10-20% higher than those on the brachial artery. (wikipedia.org)
  • subclavian
  • Subclavian artery pseudoaneurysm is a well-described complication as an inadvertent arterial puncture following central venous catheterization ( 2 ). (onlinejacc.org)
  • First described in 1975, it is an alternative to central venous catheters in major veins such as the subclavian vein, the internal jugular vein or the femoral vein. (wikipedia.org)
  • aneurysm
  • A true aneurysm is one that involves all three layers of the wall of an artery (intima, media and adventitia). (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] The heart, including coronary artery aneurysms, ventricular aneurysms, aneurysm of sinus of Valsalva, and aneurysms following cardiac surgery. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] The kidney, including renal artery aneurysm and intraparechymal aneurysms. (wikipedia.org)
  • The next most common sites of cerebral aneurysm occurrence are in the internal carotid artery. (wikipedia.org)
  • atherosclerosis
  • When it is blocked through atherosclerosis , percutaneous intervention with access from the opposite femoral may be needed. (wikipedia.org)
  • Narrowing (stenosis) is usually caused by the deposition of plaques of atheroma (a fatty substance) on the inner walls of arteries in atherosclerosis. (sciencephoto.com)
  • distal
  • These are found beneath the superficial femoral along the medial aspect of the knee, encapsulating the distal or lower femur, the proximal or upper tibia, and the patella or kneecap. (wisegeek.com)
  • For coronary and peripheral vascular disease, lack of "runoff" to the distal area is also a contraindication because a vascular bypass around one diseased artery to another diseased area does not solve the vascular problem. (wikipedia.org)
  • anatomical
  • We conclude that increased FSS can overcome the anatomical restrictions of collateral arteries and is potentially able to completely restore maximal collateral conductance. (biomedsearch.com)
  • ischemic
  • Damage to the artery following a femoral neck fracture may lead to avascular necrosis (ischemic) of the femoral neck/head. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the skull, when blood flow is blocked or a damaged cerebral artery prevents adequate blood flow to the brain, a cerebral artery bypass may be performed to improve or restore flow to an oxygen-deprived (ischemic) area of the brain. (wikipedia.org)
  • pathology
  • The authors review the etiology, pathology, diagnosis and treatment modalities for post-cath femoral pseudoaneurysms. (ozon.ru)
  • genicular
  • The reason for this is the fact that the genicular anastomosis is only present in a minority of individuals and is always undeveloped when disease in the femoral artery is absent. (wikipedia.org)
  • pseudoaneurysms
  • Femoral pseudoaneurysms complicating cardiac catheterization results in significant morbidity. (ozon.ru)
  • This monograph should be useful for interventional cardiologists, vascular medicine specialists and interventional neuroradiologists who would like a comprehensive review of femoral pseudoaneurysms. (ozon.ru)
  • Pseudoaneurysms can be caused by trauma that punctures the artery, such as knife and bullet wounds, as a result of percutaneous surgical procedures such as coronary angiography or arterial grafting, or use of an artery for injection. (wikipedia.org)
  • superior glutea
  • one of these enters an oblique canal to supply the bone, while others run along the crest of the ilium, distributing branches to the gluteal and abdominal muscles, and anastomosing in their course with the superior gluteal artery, iliac circumflex artery, and the lateral circumflex femoral artery. (wikipedia.org)
  • The deep branch runs obliquely upward upon the tendon of the obturator externus and in front of the quadratus femoris toward the trochanteric fossa, where it anastomoses with twigs from the superior gluteal artery and inferior gluteal artery. (wikipedia.org)
  • Superior gluteal artery This article incorporates text in the public domain from the 20th edition of Gray's Anatomy (1918) Inferior_gluteal_artery at the Duke University Health System's Orthopedics program Anatomy figure: 43:07-12 at Human Anatomy Online, SUNY Downstate Medical Center - "Sagittal view of the internal iliac artery and its branches in the female pelvis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Nerves
  • It passes down on the sacral plexus of nerves and the piriformis muscle, behind the internal pudendal artery, to the lower part of the greater sciatic foramen, through which it escapes from the pelvis between the piriformis and coccygeus. (wikipedia.org)
  • inferior
  • It passes between the Sartorius and Gracilis, and, piercing the fascia lata, is distributed to the integument of the upper and medial part of the leg, anastomosing with the medial inferior genicular artery. (wikipedia.org)
  • unstable
  • A vulnerable plaque is a kind of atheromatous plaque - a collection of white blood cells (primarily macrophages) and lipids (including cholesterol) in the wall of an artery - that is particularly unstable and prone to produce sudden major problems such as a heart attack or stroke. (wikipedia.org)
  • heart
  • Mechanical stretching and contraction of the artery, with each heart beat, i.e. the pulse, results in rupture of the thin covering membrane, spewing clot-promoting plaque contents into the blood stream. (wikipedia.org)
  • When this inflammation is combined with other stresses, such as high blood pressure (increased mechanical stretching and contraction of the arteries with each heart beat), it can cause the thin covering over the plaque to split, spilling the contents of the vulnerable plaque into the bloodstream. (wikipedia.org)
  • wall
  • Researchers now think that vulnerable plaque, (see atherosclerosis) is formed in the following way: Lipoprotein LDL particles, which carry fats (including the fat cholesterol made by every human cell) within the water/plasma portion of the blood stream, are absorbed into the artery wall, past the endothelium lining, some of the LDL-lipoprotein particles become oxidized and this attracts macrophages that eat the particles. (wikipedia.org)
  • To be specific: oxidized lipoprotein particles in the artery wall are an irritant which causes the release of proteins (called cytokines) which attract monocyte white blood cells (white blood cells are the inflammatory cells within the body). (wikipedia.org)
  • The cytokines induce the endothelial cells lining the artery wall to display adhesion molecules that attract immune-system white blood cells (to be specific, monocytes). (wikipedia.org)
  • The monocytes squeeze into the artery wall. (wikipedia.org)
  • small
  • First, Mitchell would kill a young woman in a bathtub by slicing her femoral artery with a straight razor while putting her in a choke hold, and holding up a small mirror so that he can see her face as she dies. (wikipedia.org)
  • blood
  • Researchers have found that accumulation of white blood cells, especially macrophages, termed inflammation, in the walls of the arteries leads to the development of "soft" or vulnerable plaque, which when released aggressively promotes blood clotting. (wikipedia.org)
  • images
  • They then interpret the images taken to ascertain where the narrowed or blocked artery has the problem. (wikipedia.org)