• urine
  • A false positive reaction can be due to the presence of other reducing substances in urine such as ascorbic acid (during intake of vitamin supplements), drugs (levodopa, contrast used in radiological procedures) and homogentisic acid (alkaptonuria). (wikipedia.org)
  • The Jaffe reaction is a colorimetric method used in clinical chemistry to determine creatinine levels in blood and urine. (wikipedia.org)
  • It was Otto Folin (1867-1934), a Harvard biochemist, who adapted Jaffe's research-abandoning the standard Neubauer reaction of the time-and published several papers using the Jaffe reaction to analyze creatinine levels in both blood and urine. (wikipedia.org)
  • specific
  • Paper strips are often specific to a single reaction (e.g. pH measurement), while the strips with pads allow several determinations simultaneously. (wikipedia.org)
  • known
  • The men-who became known as the Birmingham Six-maintained their innocence and insisted police had coerced them into signing false confessions through severe physical and psychological abuse. (wikipedia.org)
  • solution
  • A 3-10% solution of potassium hydroxide (KOH) gives a color change in some species of mushrooms: In Agaricus, some species such as A. xanthodermus turn yellow with KOH, many have no reaction, and A. subrutilescens turns green. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1886, Max Jaffe (1841-1911) wrote about its basic principles in the paper Über den Niederschlag, welchen Pikrinsäure in normalem Harn erzeugt und über eine neue Reaction des Kreatinins in which he described the properties of creatinine and picric acid in an alkaline solution. (wikipedia.org)
  • method
  • The Jaffe reaction, despite its nonspecificity for creatinine, is still widely employed as the method of choice for creatinine testing due to its speed, adaptability in automated analysis, and cost-effectiveness, and is the oldest methodology continued to be used in the medical laboratory. (wikipedia.org)
  • long
  • We evaluated RT-QuIC's long-term consistency and varied multiple reaction parameters. (mdpi.com)