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  • years
  • A group of 39 mothers who had a physically abused child at an average of 6 years previously and a group of 14 mothers who had a child with non-organic failure to thrive (NOFTT) 13 years ago were reviewed. (semanticscholar.org)
  • structural
  • The book summarizes the mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of the various forms of brain failure, examining in detail structural and examining metabolic causes. (springer.com)
  • Respiratory failure can have any one of several causes, such as lung disease or infection , electrolyte imbalance, interruption of the nerve signals that regulate breathing or nervous system damage, structural (rib cage) collapse, or airway obstruction. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Active citizenship Group decision-making Evidence-based policy Resource allocation Collaborative decision-making software Online participation Legitimacy (political) Global governance failure Global issue Impact assessment Systems theory Systemic problem Structural fix Collective problem solving Privatization Market failure Adaptation Criticism of democracy Criticism of capitalism Market fundamentalism Political finance Newman, Joshua (2017). (wikipedia.org)
  • Grout curtain List of hydroelectric power station failures Structural integrity and failure Osnos, Evan. (wikipedia.org)
  • MTBF
  • The MTBF is an important system parameter in systems where failure rate needs to be managed, in particular for safety systems. (wikipedia.org)
  • In special processes called renewal processes, where the time to recover from failure can be neglected and the likelihood of failure remains constant with respect to time, the failure rate is simply the multiplicative inverse of the MTBF (1/λ). (wikipedia.org)
  • resilience
  • Subjected as they are to the incessantly dynamic mechanical environment of a beating heart, a fundamental component of demonstrating safety, and one of the basic regulatory challenges, is testing to ensure their physical resilience and resistance to fatigue failure. (ahajournals.org)
  • Governance failure may also refer to what can also be described as policy failures − the effectiveness, efficiency, and resilience of specific policies. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1997
  • Destination Failure is the third album by the Chicago-based pop punk band the Smoking Popes, released August 26, 1997 by Capitol Records. (wikipedia.org)
  • Failure is an American alternative rock band from Los Angeles that was active from 1990 to 1997 and from 2014 onwards. (wikipedia.org)
  • On November 19, 1997, Failure officially announced that they had disbanded, citing personal differences. (wikipedia.org)
  • high voltage
  • Failures related to exposure to high voltage electricity or high intensity microwaves Power-generating equipment, arc welding equipment and powerful magnets (as in medical devices, heavy equipment or motors) can inhibit pulse generators. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cascading failure is a common effect seen in high voltage systems, where a single point of failure (SPF) on a fully loaded or slightly overloaded system results in a sudden spike across all nodes of the system. (wikipedia.org)
  • cause
  • These cause heart failure by changing either the structure or the functioning of the heart. (wikipedia.org)
  • Many things can cause failure to thrive, including illnesses and eating problems. (kidshealth.org)
  • Problems with breastfeeding or transitioning to solids also can cause failure to thrive. (kidshealth.org)
  • The most notorious cause of drive failure is a head crash , where the internal read-and-write head of the device, usually just hovering above the surface, touches a platter , or scratches the magnetic data-storage surface. (wikipedia.org)
  • Another cause of failure is a faulty air filter . (wikipedia.org)
  • In breastfeeding, lactation failure may refer to: Primary lactation failure, a cause of low milk supply in breastfeeding mothers Cessation of breastfeeding before the mother had planned to stop, usually as a result of breastfeeding difficulties Low milk supply in general Lawrence, Ruth A. (1986). (wikipedia.org)
  • Dam failures are comparatively rare, but can cause immense damage and loss of life when they occur. (wikipedia.org)
  • Definition
  • Although it's been recognized for more than a century, failure to thrive lacks a clear definition, in part because it's not a disease or disorder itself. (kidshealth.org)
  • Although this deformation or weakening of the material is not the technical definition of ultimate failure, the piece has failed. (wikipedia.org)
  • argues
  • Arrow argues that nonprofits will step in and provide the necessary good or service in response to market failure. (wikipedia.org)
  • describes
  • Contract failure describes a situation in which the consumer of a good or service is unable to evaluate its quality, thus incentivizing the producer to produce a lower quality good or service. (wikipedia.org)
  • A continuous failure rate depends on the existence of a failure distribution, F ( t ) {\displaystyle \scriptstyle F(t)} , which is a cumulative distribution function that describes the probability of failure (at least) up to and including time t, Pr ⁡ ( T ≤ t ) = F ( t ) = 1 − R ( t ) , t ≥ 0. (wikipedia.org)
  • In mechanical engineering, ultimate failure describes the breaking of a material. (wikipedia.org)
  • heart
  • Heart failure is a major human disease that afflicts millions of people worldwide. (keystonesymposia.org)
  • The overall goal of this Keystone Symposia conference is to focus on heart failure and highlight the scientific advances in basic discovery and early-phase therapeutic development in this fast-moving field. (keystonesymposia.org)
  • Chest pain , including angina , does not typically occur due to heart failure. (wikipedia.org)
  • heart failure due to left ventricular dysfunction and heart failure with normal ejection fraction depending on whether the ability of the left ventricle to contract is affected, or the heart's ability to relax. (wikipedia.org)
  • Heart failure is not the same as myocardial infarction (in which part of the heart muscle dies) or cardiac arrest (in which blood flow stops altogether). (wikipedia.org)
  • In those with heart failure due to left ventricular dysfunction, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers along with beta blockers are recommended. (wikipedia.org)
  • Heart failure is a common, costly, and potentially fatal condition. (wikipedia.org)
  • Heart failure has been known since ancient times with the Ebers papyrus commenting on it around 1550 BCE. (wikipedia.org)
  • Heart failure is a physiological state in which cardiac output is insufficient to meet the needs of the body and lungs. (wikipedia.org)
  • Thus, conditions leading to heart failure (In Frenchinsuffisance cardiaque) are picked up at a very early stage and adequate corrective actions areundertaken.Further, there is constant refinement of the therapeutic modalities, especially angioplastytechniques involving stets, which helps prevent cell death. (slideshare.net)
  • High-output heart failure can occur when there is an increased cardiac output. (wikipedia.org)
  • Heart failure is divided into two types based on ejection fraction, which is the proportion of blood pumped out of the heart during a single contraction. (wikipedia.org)
  • The two types are: 1) Heart failure due to reduced ejection fraction. (wikipedia.org)
  • This type is also known as heart failure due to left ventricular systolic dysfunction or systolic heart failure. (wikipedia.org)
  • attempts
  • However, government policy interventions, such as taxes, subsidies, bailouts, wage and price controls, and regulations (including poorly implemented attempts to correct market failure), may also lead to an inefficient allocation of resources, sometimes called government failure. (wikipedia.org)
  • Given the tension between, on the one hand, the undeniable costs to society caused by market failure, and on the other hand, the potential that attempts to mitigate these costs could lead to even greater costs from "government failure", there is sometimes a choice between imperfect outcomes, i.e. imperfect market outcomes with or without government interventions. (wikipedia.org)
  • A similar ratio used in the transport industries, especially in railways and trucking is "mean distance between failures", a variation which attempts to correlate actual loaded distances to similar reliability needs and practices. (wikipedia.org)
  • clinical
  • New techniques of monitoring brain failure are described and their clinical usefulness defined, providing intensive care physicians, anaesthesiologists and neurologists a solid basis on which to build their knowledge of the brain-failure patient. (springer.com)
  • loss
  • In economics, market failure is a situation in which the allocation of goods and services is not efficient, often leading to a net social welfare loss. (wikipedia.org)
  • signs
  • In most technical applications pieces are rarely allowed to reach their ultimate failure or breakage point, instead for safety factors they are removed at the first signs of significant wear. (wikipedia.org)
  • existence
  • Public goods are both non-rival and non-excludable (i.e., public goods are not only non-excludable) thus existence of a market failure is often the reason that self-regulatory organizations, governments or supra-national institutions intervene in a particular market. (wikipedia.org)
  • conditions
  • The failure rate can be defined as the following: The total number of failures within an item population, divided by the total time expended by that population, during a particular measurement interval under stated conditions. (wikipedia.org)
  • For example, under certain conditions a large power grid can collapse after the failure of a single transformer. (wikipedia.org)
  • implantation
  • Failure of a pacemaker is defined by the requirement of repeat surgical pacemaker-related procedures after the initial implantation. (wikipedia.org)
  • often
  • Market failures are often associated with time-inconsistent preferences, information asymmetries, non-competitive markets, principal-agent problems, or externalities. (wikipedia.org)
  • Failure of a dental implant is often related to the failure of the implant to osseointegrate correctly with the bone, or vice versa. (wikipedia.org)
  • This is valid and useful if the failure rate may be assumed constant - often used for complex units / systems, electronics - and is a general agreement in some reliability standards (Military and Aerospace). (wikipedia.org)
  • problems
  • Sometimes a mix of medical problems and environmental factors leads to failure to thrive. (kidshealth.org)
  • One of the primary problems with preventing electrical grid failures is that the speed of the control signal is no faster than the speed of the propagating power overload, i.e. since both the control signal and the electrical power are moving at the same speed, it is not possible to isolate the outage by sending a warning ahead to isolate the element. (wikipedia.org)
  • although
  • Although undesired, this can help speed up the recovery from this failure as connections will time out, and other nodes will give up trying to establish connections to the section(s) that have become cut off, decreasing load on the involved nodes. (wikipedia.org)
  • major
  • In order to improve and standardize failure reporting practices to the public, the AAMI is developing an American standard for cochlear implants in collaboration with the FDA, major cochlear implant manufacturers, the CALCE center for reliability, doctors, and clinicians. (wikipedia.org)
  • A list of dam failures and incidents in the United States Dam Safety.org Chronology of major tailings dam failures from 1960 WISE Uranium Project Chanson, H. (2009) Application of the Method of Characteristics to the Dam Break Wave Problem Journal of Hydraulic Research, IAHR, Vol. 47, No. 1, pp. 41-49 doi:10.3826/jhr.2009.2865 (ISSN 0022-1686). (wikipedia.org)
  • development
  • Cascade failures are a relatively recent development, with the massive increase in traffic and the high interconnectivity between systems and networks. (wikipedia.org)
  • Factors
  • Failure rates are important factors in the insurance, finance, commerce and regulatory industries and fundamental to the design of safe systems in a wide variety of applications. (wikipedia.org)
  • context
  • In this context, the cascading failure is known by the term cascade failure. (wikipedia.org)
  • The term was first applied in this context in the late 1990s by a Dutch IT professional and has slowly become a relatively common term for this kind of large-scale failure. (wikipedia.org)
  • material
  • In ultimate failure this will result in one or more breaks in the material. (wikipedia.org)
  • In engineering there are multiple types of failure based upon the application of the material. (wikipedia.org)
  • Once the material has reached its ultimate tensile strength it will elongate more easily until it reaches ultimate failure and breaks. (wikipedia.org)