• Human Factors
  • 349 Introduction to Human Factors. (wisc.edu)
  • Ergonomics and Human Factors concerns are important in the design of modern cockpits. (wikipedia.org)
  • Human Factors in Engineering and Design is an engineering textbook, currently in its seventh edition. (wikipedia.org)
  • The book, first published in 1957, is considered a classic in human factors and ergonomics, and one of the best-established texts in the field. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is frequently taught in upper-level and graduate courses in the U.S., and is relied on by practicing human factors and ergonomics professionals. (wikipedia.org)
  • and Human Factors: Selected Topics. (wikipedia.org)
  • Professional Certification in Ergonomics in the U.S.". International Encyclopedia of Ergonomics and Human Factors: Volume 1. (wikipedia.org)
  • Play media Human factors and ergonomics (commonly referred to as HF&E), also known as comfort design, functional design, and systems, is the practice of designing products, systems, or processes to take proper account of the interaction between them and the people who use them. (wikipedia.org)
  • The two terms "human factors" and "ergonomics" are essentially synonymous. (wikipedia.org)
  • The International Ergonomics Association defines ergonomics or human factors as follows: Ergonomics (or human factors) is the scientific discipline concerned with the understanding of interactions among humans and other elements of a system, and the profession that applies theory, principles, data and methods to design to optimize human well-being and overall system performance. (wikipedia.org)
  • Human factors and ergonomics is concerned with the "fit" between the user, equipment and their environments. (wikipedia.org)
  • The expression human factors is a predominantly North American term which has been adopted to emphasise the application of the same methods to non-work-related situations. (wikipedia.org)
  • The emerging field of human factors in highway safety uses human factor principles to understand the actions and capabilities of road users - car and truck drivers, pedestrians, bicyclists, etc. - and use this knowledge to design roads and streets to reduce traffic collisions. (wikipedia.org)
  • For instance, "user trial engineer" may refer to a human factors professional who specialises in user trials. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] Although the names change, human factors professionals apply an understanding of human factors to the design of equipment, systems and working methods to improve comfort, health, safety, and productivity. (wikipedia.org)
  • humans
  • Several in vivo factors related to inflammation and oxidative stress have been demonstrated to influence the biological variation in vitamin C concentration in humans. (springer.com)
  • A "human factor" is a physical or cognitive property of an individual or social behavior specific to humans that may influence the functioning of technological systems. (wikipedia.org)
  • Since the second half of the 20th century, physical anthropology has moved away from a typological understanding of human biological diversity towards a genomic and population-based perspective, and they have tended to understand race as a social classification of humans based on phenotype and ancestry as well as cultural factors, as the concept is also understood in the social sciences. (wikipedia.org)
  • vitamin C deficien
  • The Hp polymorphism is an important non-nutritional modifying factor in the pathogenesis of vitamin C deficiency and scurvy, which may explain the success of long-range human migration by the natural selection of some populations characterized by high Hp 1 allele frequencies. (springer.com)
  • physical
  • One study found that "untrainable" physical factors, including the Ape Index, were not necessarily predictors of climbing ability, in spite of a general tendency identified in previous studies for elite athletes in the sport to share these characteristics. (wikipedia.org)
  • Auxologic is a broad term covering the study of all aspects of human physical growth Human height varies greatly between individuals and across populations for a variety of complex biological, genetic, and environmental factors, among others. (wikipedia.org)
  • Physical status: the use and interpretation of anthropometry. (wikipedia.org)
  • contributions
  • To develop a better understanding of the link between tissue specificity and neonatal EWAS, and the contributions of genotype and prenatal factors, we compared genome-wide DNA methylation of cord tissue and cord blood, two of the most accessible surrogate tissues at birth. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Alphonse Bertillon (1853-1914) is considered to be the father of anthropometry because of his many contributions to the field, including what we know today as the "mug shot. (wikipedia.org)
  • genetics
  • The inter-relationship between genetics, prenatal factors and epigenetics is tissue specific, and requires careful consideration in designing and interpreting future neonatal EWAS. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Genetics is a major factor in determining the height of individuals, though it is far less influential in regard to differences among populations. (wikipedia.org)
  • Height, like other phenotypic traits, is determined by a combination of genetics and environmental factors. (wikipedia.org)
  • progression
  • Epigenome-wide association studies (EWAS) using neonate tissues can help interrogate the inter-relationship between these factors and enhance our understanding of the biological mechanisms underpinning disease predisposition and progression. (biomedcentral.com)
  • knee
  • They found that it actually appears to be a factor linked with the presence of knee pain as well as osteoarthritis in obese study subjects. (wikipedia.org)
  • obesity
  • These findings can inform for whom health services for managing pediatric obesity should be prioritized, especially in circumstances when boys and girls present with CR factors. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • Metabolic and body composition factors in subgroups of obesity:what do we know? (wikipedia.org)
  • important
  • The growth of an organ from inception to a definitive functional stage is dependent on the integrated function of the whole organism which depends on a number of parameters such as the nucleic acid content of the cells which is one of the most important factors. (wikipedia.org)
  • circumstances
  • A national surveillance system based on police crash reports provides more detailed information on circumstances and contributing factors for fatal MVCs. (wikipedia.org)
  • lifestyle
  • By the use of a simple questionnaire survey, we aimed at exploring whether there are any differences in these lifestyle factors between women and between offspring 5-8 years after PE (23 women-child pairs) or DM (23 women-child pairs) in pregnancy, compared to uncomplicated pregnancies (controls, 17 women-child pairs). (biomedsearch.com)
  • Researchers may try to evaluate the contribution of a particular lifestyle, environmental and genetic factor and a chosen endophenotype. (wikipedia.org)
  • applications
  • At various times in history, applications of anthropometry have ranged vastly-from accurate scientific description and epidemiological analysis to rationales for eugenics and overtly racist social movements-and its points of concern have been numerous, diverse, and sometimes highly unexpected. (wikipedia.org)
  • potentially
  • Countering these studies are other works that have identified the Ape Index as a significant (or potentially significant) factor. (wikipedia.org)
  • fatal
  • Driver error is listed as a contributing factor in 44% of fatal collisions in the United States, so a topic of particular interest is how road users gather and process information about the road and its environment, and how to assist them to make the appropriate decision. (wikipedia.org)
  • scientific
  • Anthropometry is defined as the scientific study of the human body measurements and proportions.These studies are generally used by clinicians and pathologists for adequate assessments of the growth and development of the fetus at any specific point of gestational maturity. (wikipedia.org)
  • environmental
  • When populations share genetic background and environmental factors, average height is frequently characteristic within the group. (wikipedia.org)
  • In regions of poverty or warfare, environmental factors like chronic malnutrition during childhood or adolescence may result in delayed growth and/or marked reductions in adult stature even without the presence of any of these medical conditions. (wikipedia.org)
  • study
  • A 2001 study comparing teenage male and female rock climbers noted that performance differences between the genders could be explained by a number of factors, one of which was the lower Ape Index found in the female climbers. (wikipedia.org)
  • term
  • To determine and compare the age at weaning in term appropriate size for gestational age (AGA), small for gestational age (SGA), and preterm infants, and factors associated with weaning age in these groups. (bmj.com)
  • development
  • Another key point for the development of vascular lesions is the capillary basement membrane thickening as a result of hyperglycemia, increased synthesis of basement membrane components and other factors. (biomedcentral.com)
  • include
  • Contributing factors include fatigue and long work hours, delivery pressures, distractions from mobile phones and other devices, lack of training to operate the assigned vehicle, vehicle defects, use of prescription and non-prescription medications, medical conditions, and poor journey planning. (wikipedia.org)
  • studies
  • Previous studies have also observed less concordance in the DNA methylation-prenatal factor associations performed on different infant tissues. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Some studies have suggested that the main factor which explains the metabolic abnormalities in MONW individuals is fat distribution. (wikipedia.org)
  • presence
  • In the presence of transition metals (iron and copper), the antiscorbutic factor shifts from an antioxidant to a pro-oxidant function. (springer.com)