• genome
  • Microsatellites are found both in prokaryotes and eukaryotes, including humans, wherein they appear scattered almost at random throughout the genome. (bmj.com)
  • In fact "functional DNA", consisting of transcribed genes and regions involved either in transcriptional regulation or in maintaining chromosomal structure/integrity, is thought to comprise less than a sixth of the total human genome. (bmj.com)
  • Microsatellites litter the genome, exonically and intronically, and as I discussed last week are prone to inducing various types of mutations within a given gene particularly when the local DNA conformation is under greater tensional strain. (scienceoveracuppa.com)
  • The complete cp genome of C. apetalus has the length of 151,228 bp, 36.65% GC content, and a quadripartite structure with a large single copy (LSC) of 83,380 bp and a small single copy (SSC) of 17,206 bp separated by inverted repeats (IRs) of 25,321 bp. (peerj.com)
  • The cp genome contains 131 genes, including 112 unique genes and 19 genes which are duplicated in the IRs. (peerj.com)
  • genomic
  • These observations might impact ongoing tries to make use of LMD and MCMC simulations for TRS-related modeling of genomic DNA efficiency in elucidating the common denominators of the dynamic TRS expansion mutation with potential therapeutic applications. (cancer-basics.com)
  • It is likely that the local base pair dynamics may display some sequence and number of repeats specificity that could underline the propensity for growth and possibly alteration in genomic DNA functions. (cancer-basics.com)
  • genetic
  • 4 , 5 So far, many genes have been attributed to cause this disease, thereby revealing its genetic complexity. (arvojournals.org)
  • However, when used to refer to the number of repeating units of genetic information that are sufficient to encode the blueprint for something as complex as a human being, it never ceases to amaze me that this number is big enough! (bmj.com)
  • humans
  • Nevertheless, even focusing as intended upon microsatellites and their relevance to humans, it should become clear that most of these questions remain ones that will require consideration, even if only in passing. (bmj.com)
  • known
  • Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania demonstrated that in fruit flies, a protein previously known to bind CUG repeats (muscleblind, or mbl) is also capable of binding CAG repeats. (wikipedia.org)
  • There are several families of interspersed repetitive DNA, although the two largest are known as short and long interspersed nuclear elements (SINEs and LINEs, respectively), 1 and it is to the SINE family that the frequently mentioned Alu repeat belongs. (bmj.com)
  • severity
  • The increase in the number of repeats over time leads to earlier development and increased severity of symptoms in affected individuals in successive generations. (lidsen.com)
  • repetitive
  • The residual fifth is moderately to highly repetitive, and can be divided into two types, depending on whether the individual repeat units are dispersed singularly (interspersed repetitive DNA) or clustered together (satellite DNA). (bmj.com)
  • found
  • Overexpression of Mre11p or Rad50p suppresses the inhibition of DSB repair by CAG 98 and significantly increases the average size of expansions found at the recipient locus. (embopress.org)
  • human
  • The human homolog of mbl, MBNL1, which was originally identified as binding CUG repeats in RNA, has since been shown to bind CAG (and CCG) repeats as well. (wikipedia.org)
  • study of ancient expansion, contraction, demographic and migration, analysis of possible racial and human evolutionary history. (blogspot.com)
  • role
  • Although in prokaryotes distinct biological functions have been demonstrated, the role of microsatellites in eukaryotes is less clear. (bmj.com)