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  • Yeshiva Univers
  • Judaism portal Medicine portal Medical genetics of Jews Yeshiva University Medical Ethics Society http://www.yourhoustonnews.com/bay_area/living/new-course-to-explore-jewish-perspective-on-modern-ethical-dilemmas/article_09cf1211-c321-5811-a6f0-a8d0fc1f4fc1.html http://www.lamorindaweekly.com/archive/issue0717/pdf/Lamorindans-Learn-about-Tough-Cancer-Problem.pdf http://www.myjli.com/index.html?task=news_full&nid=370 "Jewish ethics viewed as helpful in medicine. (wikipedia.org)
  • 20th century
  • While the secularized field borrowed largely from Catholic medical ethics, in the 20th century a distinctively liberal Protestant approach was articulated by thinkers such as Joseph Fletcher. (wikipedia.org)
  • The scientific community, and the medical community in particular, have been the impetus for some of the most barbaric and immoral programs of the 20th century. (consciencelaws.org)
  • When we look back at the past hundred years, we face the uncomfortable reality that the scientific community, and the medical community in particular, have been the impetus for some of the most barbaric and immoral programs of the 20th century. (consciencelaws.org)
  • healthcare
  • The topics span clinical medicine (end of life care and medical error), healthcare management (priority setting), science (biotechnology), and education (of medical ethics). (bmj.com)
  • Ethics and healthcare law are becoming matters of general interest, and there are still relatively few doctors willing or able to present the medical profession's view to the media.All these changes have meant that career possibilities are opening up, but if you're dreaming of a job stalking the wards supporting patients in a battle against arrogant consultants then you've been watching too many television dramas. (bmj.com)
  • MME encompasses the practical application of ethics by military physicians and other healthcare practitioners to dilemmas in military clinical and public health settings in which the patients may be friendly or enemy personnel or in which civilians are affected by military operations. (wikipedia.org)
  • ethicists
  • Pioneering medical ethicists in the Conservative movement included rabbis Elliot Dorff, David Feldman, Aaron Mackler, Joel Roth, and Avram Reisner, while more recent figures have included Leonard Sharzer. (wikipedia.org)
  • Physicians
  • 9. It is the duty of physicians who are involved in medical research to protect the life, health, dignity, integrity, right to self-determination, privacy, and confidentiality of personal information of research subjects. (wma.net)
  • 14. Physicians who combine medical research with medical care should involve their patients in research only to the extent that this is justified by its potential preventive, diagnostic or therapeutic value and if the physician has good reason to believe that participation in the research study will not adversely affect the health of the patients who serve as research subjects. (wma.net)
  • Typically they portray ideal physicians as devoted to the welfare of patients and to advancement of the medical profession and medical knowledge, responding compassionately to the suffering of patients, humbly mindful of the limits of their curative powers and the harms they may unintentionally cause. (nyu.edu)
  • Some physicians reject such criticism as intervention by lawyers, philosophers, feminists, and other social critics ignorant of the realities of medical and hospital life. (nyu.edu)
  • Historically, Western medical ethics may be traced to guidelines on the duty of physicians in antiquity, such as the Hippocratic Oath, and early Christian teachings. (wikipedia.org)
  • Founded by its director, Mark Siegler, the MacLean Center for Clinical Medical Ethics aims to improve patient care and outcomes by promoting research in clinical medical ethics by educating physicians, nurses, and other health care professionals and by helping University of Chicago Medicine patients, families, and health care providers identify and resolve ethical dilemmas. (wikipedia.org)
  • Medical Code of Ethics this document establishing the ethical rules of behaviour of physicians and dental practitioners, defining the priorities of their professional work, showing the principles in the relations with patients, other physicians and the rest of community. (wikipedia.org)
  • moral
  • The rising interest in medical ethics reflects changes in the doctor-patient relationship and the increasing number of moral challenges thrown our way by new technology and the dilemma on how to spend limited resources. (bmj.com)
  • Medical ethics has been defined as "the analytical activity in which the concepts, assumptions, beliefs, attitudes, emotions, reasons and arguments underlying medico-moral decision making are examined critically. (bmj.com)
  • Both are primarily fields of applied ethics, the study of moral values and judgments as they apply to the specific contexts of medicine and military affairs, respectively. (wikipedia.org)
  • An extraordinary movement is under way to put together the most conscientious thinking in the nation on the many moral and ethical issues raised by advances in the medical and biological sciences. (cqpress.com)
  • Major new developments in the biological and medical sciences call for moral and ethical decisions for which there are few precedents. (cqpress.com)
  • It becomes painfully apparent that secular, scientific and medical credentials do not imply moral rectitude. (consciencelaws.org)
  • doctors
  • In Tomorrow's Doctors the GMC stated that medical ethics and law should constitute one of the core components of the medical curriculum. (bmj.com)
  • In some schools, such as Manchester and Bristol, medical students even have the option of spending an intercalated year studying ethics.Not only doctors have become aware of the need for a better understanding of ethical debate. (bmj.com)
  • Doctors are not trained at medical school to recognize the side effects of fluoride (if anything they are taught there are none). (fluoridealert.org)
  • Why is this so and what events brought about this increased interest in teaching ethics to doctors? (consciencelaws.org)
  • Medical Murder: Disturbing Cases of Doctors Who Kill. (wikipedia.org)
  • Methods
  • 6. The primary purpose of medical research involving human subjects is to understand the causes, development and effects of diseases and improve preventive, diagnostic and therapeutic interventions (methods, procedures and treatments). (wma.net)
  • It promotes programs to teach the methods to medical students, practitioners, and policy makers. (wikipedia.org)
  • These areas of research increased awareness of the weaknesses in medical decision making at the level of both individual patients and populations, and paved the way for the introduction of evidence-based methods. (wikipedia.org)
  • The second is the introduction of epidemiological methods into medical education and individual patient-level decision-making. (wikipedia.org)
  • qualifications
  • 12. Medical research involving human subjects must be conducted only by individuals with the appropriate ethics and scientific education, training and qualifications. (wma.net)
  • Many relish the challenge that medical ethics offer, and postgraduate study and qualifications in medical ethics can lead to a variety of career opportunities, especially in the shape of part time work among a wider portfolio. (bmj.com)
  • It is approved and delivered by people without medical qualifications. (fluoridealert.org)
  • research
  • The WMA encourages others who are involved in medical research involving human subjects to adopt these principles. (wma.net)
  • 4. It is the duty of the physician to promote and safeguard the health, well-being and rights of patients, including those who are involved in medical research. (wma.net)
  • 5. Medical progress is based on research that ultimately must include studies involving human subjects. (wma.net)
  • 7. Medical research is subject to ethical standards that promote and ensure respect for all human subjects and protect their health and rights. (wma.net)
  • 8. While the primary purpose of medical research is to generate new knowledge, this goal can never take precedence over the rights and interests of individual research subjects. (wma.net)
  • 11. Medical research should be conducted in a manner that minimises possible harm to the environment. (wma.net)
  • 13. Groups that are underrepresented in medical research should be provided appropriate access to participation in research. (wma.net)
  • The MacLean Center for Clinical Medical Ethics, founded in 1981, is a non-profit clinical medical ethics research institute based in the United States. (wikipedia.org)
  • and by encouraging scholarly research and publication in clinical medical ethics. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Center developed the concept of "research ethics consultation" in 1987 and has continued to offer this service to translational researchers and to the IRB. (wikipedia.org)
  • The MacLean Center's transplant work is one example of the wide range of ethics-related research projects undertaken by its faculty. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, until recently, the process by which research results were incorporated in medical decisions was highly subjective. (wikipedia.org)
  • Three principal types of genealogical DNA tests are available, with each looking at a different part of the genome and useful for different types of genealogical research: Autosomal, Mitochondrial, and Y. In general, genealogical DNA tests do not give information about medical conditions or diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • medicine
  • This may sound odd if your vision of medical ethics is the application to medicine of the Hippocratic oath. (bmj.com)
  • 1 That's a hot potato for debate, and anyone hoping that ethics will provide simple straightforward answers will be disappointed.Ethics is central to every branch of medicine, although there are still plenty of cynics out there. (bmj.com)
  • As explained by the American Medical Association , the doctor must inform the patient of the medicine's benefits, side effects, and alternatives and then allow the patient to decide whether to take the medicine or not. (fluoridealert.org)
  • Euthanasia corrupts everything it touches-including, it would seem, the ethics of organ transplant medicine. (nationalreview.com)
  • Evidence based medicine and ethics. (wikipedia.org)
  • Huge payout in US stuttering case - BBC News Medical Apartheid: The Dark History of Medical Experimentation on Black Americans from Colonial Times to the Present Social History of Medicine (2007) 20 (3): 620-621. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Center's current and former faculty and fellows have published more than 210 books on topics related to medicine and medical ethics. (wikipedia.org)
  • Since 1984, The Interdisciplinary Faculty Seminar Series has organized weekly meetings throughout the academic year to provide a sustainable interdisciplinary forum on issues in medicine and medical ethics. (wikipedia.org)
  • Whether applied to medical education, decisions about individuals, guidelines and policies applied to populations, or administration of health services in general, evidence-based medicine advocates that to the greatest extent possible, decisions and policies should be based on evidence, not just the beliefs of practitioners, experts, or administrators. (wikipedia.org)
  • journals
  • Where are we as a society that killing and harvesting are respectfully discussed in one of the world's most respected medical journals-and no one brings up crucial issues of right and wrong ? (nationalreview.com)
  • Experiments
  • Book review:The Plutonium Files: America's Secret Medical Experiments in the Cold War, The Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, Nov/Dec 1999, 55(6): 58-61. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1992
  • After 26 years teaching at Southern, Barnette went on to work at the University of Louisville Medical School, teaching psychiatry from 1977 until 1992. (wikipedia.org)
  • life
  • Objectives: To determine the role played by law in medical specialists' decision-making about withholding and withdrawing life-sustaining treatment (WWLST) from adults who lack capacity, and the extent to which legal knowledge affects whether law is followed. (apo.org.au)
  • genes
  • The history of concern about the potential for gene doping follows the history of gene therapy, the medical use of genes to treat diseases, which was first clinically tested in the 1990s. (wikipedia.org)
  • physician
  • Although still supported by religious texts and medical tradition, this ideal physician is increasingly criticized as 'paternalistic,' too willing to act on judgments of a patient's best interests without the patient's knowledge or consent. (nyu.edu)
  • The term medical ethics first dates back to 1803, when English author and physician Thomas Percival published a document describing the requirements and expectations of medical professionals within medical facilities. (wikipedia.org)