• reform
  • The bill was introduced during the first session of the 111th Congress as part of an effort of the Democratic Party leadership to enact health care reform. (wikipedia.org)
  • The 1017 page PDF version of the bill is the first of three health care reform-related legislative proposals expected from the Democratic congressional leadership. (wikipedia.org)
  • Basaglia Law or Law 180 (Italian: Legge Basaglia, Legge 180) is the Italian Mental Health Act of 1978 which signified a large reform of the psychiatric system in Italy, contained directives for the closing down of all psychiatric hospitals and led to their gradual replacement with a whole range of community-based services, including settings for acute in-patient care. (wikipedia.org)
  • Implementation of the psychiatric reform law was accomplished in 1998 which marked the very end of the state psychiatric hospital system in Italy. (wikipedia.org)
  • Following his election, Obama downplayed the need for a public health insurance option, including calling it a "sliver" of health care reform, but still campaigned for the option up until the health care reform was passed. (wikipedia.org)
  • The issue of health insurance reform in the United States has been the subject of political debate since the early part of the 20th century. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] Nursing homes have been the subject of decades of efforts by states and at the national levels to reform health and residential care for "frail" elders, especially those with lower incomes in the US. (wikipedia.org)
  • Endorse the proposal, either as a physician / medical student , or as a non-physician health professional / reform advocate outside the health professions . (pnhp.org)
  • 2000
  • 2 Profits at 10 of the country's largest publicly traded health insurance companies in 2007 rose 428 percent from 2000 to 2007, from $2.4 billion to $12.9 billion, according to U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission filings. (truth-out.org)
  • For example, France built upon its 1928 national health insurance system, with subsequent legislation covering a larger and larger percentage of the population, until the remaining 1% of the population that was uninsured received coverage in 2000. (wikipedia.org)
  • Public insurance cover increased from 2000-2010 in part because of an aging population and an economic downturn in the latter part of the decade. (wikipedia.org)
  • born 26 June 1936) is a Taiwanese geneticist who led the Department of Health from 2000 to 2002. (wikipedia.org)
  • Lee was appointed Director-General of the Department of Health in April 2000 and took office on 20 May. (wikipedia.org)
  • In October 2000, Lee submitted a written protest to the agency for leaving Taiwan off a list of polio-free countries, stating that Taiwan should be listed separately from China, which had not yet succeeded in eradicating the disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • The "abortion pill," the drug RU-486 (mifepristone), was approved by the Food and Drug Administration in the United States in 2000. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • 1912
  • The Russian Empire established a similar system in 1912, and other industrialized countries began following suit. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1845 Poor Law Act gives limited provision of medical care to remote areas 1885 Poor Law amendment Act directed funds to urban poorhouses and away from rural provision 1910 Dewar Report published describing wholly inadequate medical provision in Highlands & Islands 1912 National Health Insurance Scheme set up but unworkable in crofting communities 1913 Highlands & Islands Medical Service set up. (wikipedia.org)
  • U.S. efforts to achieve universal coverage began with progressive health care reformers who supported Theodore Roosevelt for President in 1912, though he was defeated. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1935
  • Japan introduced an employee health insurance law in 1927, expanding further upon it in 1935 and 1940. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1933 first Air ambulance journey from Islay on a Midland Scottish Air Ferries flight to Glasgow 1934 Consultant surgeons established in Shetland, Orkney, Caithness & Lewis 1935 Consultant Physician appointed in Inverness 1936 Air ambulance service to Western Isles established 1936 Cathcart Report: "This service has revolutionised medical provision in the Highlands. (wikipedia.org)
  • Roosevelt ended up removing the health care provisions from the bill in 1935. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1935, New York City's Health Department reported dozens of cases of septicemia from abortion per month. (gothamcenter.org)
  • 1978
  • Italy introduced its Servizio Sanitario Nazionale (National Health Service) in 1978. (wikipedia.org)
  • Since the passing of Law 180 in 1978, the Italian Mental Health Act has produced serious debate, disputing its sociopolitical implications, appraising its positive points and criticizing its negative ones. (wikipedia.org)
  • America
  • Beyond the 1990s, many countries in Latin America, the Caribbean, Africa, and the Asia-Pacific region, including developing countries, took steps to bring their populations under universal health coverage, including China which has the largest universal health care system in the world. (wikipedia.org)
  • The bill was not approved by the House, but was superseded by a similar bill, the proposed Affordable Health Care for America Act (HR 3962), which was passed by the House in November 2009, by a margin of 220-215 votes but later abandoned. (wikipedia.org)
  • The availability of psychiatric beds in Italy is lower than in other comparable countries: Italy has 46 psychiatric beds for every 100, 000 population, compared with 58 in the United Kingdom and 77 in the United States of America. (wikipedia.org)
  • America is among the richest nations in the world and spends more on health care than any other country. (ascopost.com)
  • The reluctance of America to embrace universal health care may have been influenced by earlier ideologic movements in the 19th century. (ascopost.com)
  • world's
  • The positions of the world's major medical organizations range from considering elective circumcision of babies and children as having no benefit and significant risks to having a modest health benefit that outweighs small risks. (wikipedia.org)
  • Outside the parts of Africa with high prevalence of HIV/AIDS, the positions of the world's major medical organizations on non-therapeutic neonatal circumcision range from considering it as having a modest net health benefit that outweighs small risks to viewing it as having no benefit with significant risks for harm. (wikipedia.org)
  • Germany has the world's oldest national social health insurance system, with origins dating back to Otto von Bismarck's Sickness Insurance Law of 1883. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2016
  • In the run-up to the 2016 Democratic National Convention, the Democratic Platform Committee approved a plank supporting the addition of a public option onto the Affordable Care Act. (wikipedia.org)
  • Membership in the clinic plan cost $4 per year for IWO insurance holders (approximately $68 in 2016 dollars), and included a gynecological exam, contraceptives, and follow-up exams. (gothamcenter.org)
  • 1970s
  • From the 1970s to the 2000s, Southern and Western European countries began introducing universal coverage, most of them building upon previous health insurance programs to cover the whole population. (wikipedia.org)
  • Intermediate care facilities (small) were developed by the state categorical systems (intellectual disabilities, mental health), back in the 1970s, as a reaction to exposés on institutional conditions resulting in required active treatment in institutions and the new building of community facilities recommended under 16 in size. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1960s
  • Of course, this being the era from the late 1960s to the 1990s, health insurance was heavily regulated by most states, usually offered by nonprofit companies, and relatively inexpensive, so our "stupid" periods weren't usually particularly long or dangerous. (truth-out.org)
  • insurers
  • Establishes a Health Insurance Exchange (HIE) within a proposed Health Choices Administration, to provide a market place for insurers to sell qualifying plans on a public web site. (wikipedia.org)
  • The call was echoed by President Obama, who in an article for the American Medical Association stated that Congress "should revisit a public plan to compete alongside private insurers in areas of the country where competition is limited. (wikipedia.org)
  • The more people within a state who had been shut out of the individual health insurance market before because of a pre-existing condition, or an illness, the more this pool of high-risk insurers will affect the individual plan's premium. (upi.com)
  • 1972
  • Universal health insurance was then introduced in Japan (1961), and in Canada through stages, starting with the province of Saskatchewan in 1962, followed by the rest of Canada from 1968 to 1972. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1972 William Young established Overbrook Farm near Lexington, Kentucky. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1961
  • Universal health care was next introduced in the Nordic countries of Sweden (1955), Iceland (1956), Norway (1956), Denmark (1961), and Finland (1964). (wikipedia.org)
  • 1941
  • After a short employment with Bailey Meter in Cleveland, Ohio, he served as a captain in the United States Army from 1941 to 1945. (wikipedia.org)
  • Congress
  • 115TH CONGRESS 1ST SESSION H. R. 708 To amend title XXVII of the Public Health Service Act to change the permissible age variation in health insurance premium rates. (wikipedia.org)
  • One proposal to amend the Public Health Service Act is the Veteran Emergency Medical Technician Support Act of 2013 (H.R. 235), a bill in the 113th United States Congress. (wikipedia.org)
  • 113th Congress) is a bill in the 113th United States Congress that would amend the Public Health Service Act to extend and reauthorize appropriations for payments to children's hospitals for expenses associated with operating approved graduate medical residency training programs. (wikipedia.org)
  • 113th Congress) is a bill in the 113th United States Congress that would amend the Public Health Service Act to reauthorize the Emergency Medical Services for Children Program through FY2019. (wikipedia.org)
  • United States Congress. (wikipedia.org)
  • Current version of the Public Health Service Act, as codified Original uncodified bill, as amended (8/5/2009) 78th U.S. Congress (May 23, 1944). (wikipedia.org)
  • The Fair Deal was an ambitious set of proposals put forward by U.S. President Harry S. Truman to Congress in his January 1949 State of the Union address. (wikipedia.org)
  • In his 1949 State of the Union address to Congress on January 5, 1949, Truman stated that "Every segment of our population, and every individual, has a right to expect from his government a fair deal. (wikipedia.org)
  • services
  • Sets forth methods to pay institutional providers of care and health professionals for services. (wikipedia.org)
  • The provision of services may be through either publicly or privately owned health care providers. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is organized around providing a specified package of benefits to all members of a society with the end goal of providing financial risk protection, improved access to health services, and improved health outcomes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Universal health care can be determined by three critical dimensions: who is covered, what services are covered, and how much of the cost is covered. (wikipedia.org)
  • According to the United States Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), the Privacy Rule promulgated as part of HIPAA, provides patients with access to their medical records and more control over how their personal health information is used and disclosed. (truth-out.org)
  • Some of these amendments are: Family Planning Services and Population Research Act of 1970 Pub.L. 91-572, which established Title X of the Public Health Service Act, dedicated to providing family planning services for those in need. (wikipedia.org)
  • This report exposed inadequate medical and nursing services across large parts of the crofting counties and recommended a new way of delivering state funded medical services. (wikipedia.org)
  • The service also planned an expansion of nursing services with associated nursing accommodation, provide state support to the hospitals and specialists and purchase ambulances. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1919 administration moved to the Scottish Board of Health and in due course it was seen to be having the desired effect of providing adequate medical services to the population and supporting doctors to live and work in the area. (wikipedia.org)
  • Requires Health and Human Services to create a non-subsidized public health insurance plan with pricing based on private industry averages. (wikipedia.org)
  • Law 180 was based on the following main provisions: Psychiatric assistance was to be shifted away from mental hospitals to Community Mental Health Centres, newly organized in a sectorised or departmental manner to assure integrations and connections with services and community resources. (wikipedia.org)
  • The National Finance Center (NFC) is a federal government agency that provides human resources, financial and administrative services for agencies of the United States federal government. (wikipedia.org)
  • In a more technical sense, the term is used to describe any form of insurance that provides protection against the costs of medical services. (wikipedia.org)
  • They reported that 13 large institutions were certified as SNFs (skilled nursing facilities), that all were "absolutely inappropriate" placements for the developmental disabilities' clients (the federal GAO[clarification needed] then reported a need to upgrade services in the homes, including day services), and the facilities resembled the institutions that resulted in the national exposés of institutions such as Willowbrook in other fields. (wikipedia.org)
  • Expands
  • The CBO director subsequently noted that, in terms of total National Health Expenditure, non-governmental spending will increase as coverage expands. (wikipedia.org)
  • Expands health insurance coverage for dependent children to cover any unmarried adult child until he or she turns 26 years old (Sec. 2714). (votesmart.org)
  • compulsory
  • Many European countries were passing the first social welfare acts and forming the basis for compulsory government-run or voluntary subsidized health care programs. (wikipedia.org)
  • A unique American history of decentralization in government, limited government, and a tradition of classical liberalism are all possible explanations for the suspicion around the idea of compulsory government-run insurance. (wikipedia.org)
  • These reforms were attacked by the American Medical Association as well as state and local affiliates of the AMA as "compulsory health insurance. (wikipedia.org)
  • medical
  • established the first known code of medical ethics, and laid down a fee schedule for specific surgical procedures. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • In addition to direct medical costs, some national insurance plans also provide compensation for loss of work due to ill-health, or may be part of wider social insurance plans covering things such as pensions, unemployment, occupational retraining, and financial support for students. (wikipedia.org)
  • Of at least equal concern is the fact that under HIPAA, medical providers are incorrectly informing their patients (and having them put their signatures to it) that the privacy of their health records is protected. (truth-out.org)
  • Supporters argued that a government insurance company could successfully lower its rates by using greater leverage than private industry when negotiating with hospitals and doctors, as well as paying the employees of the public option insurance company salaries as opposed to paying based on individual medical procedures. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the United States, health insurance is any program that helps pay for medical expenses, whether through privately purchased insurance, social insurance or a social welfare program funded by the government. (wikipedia.org)
  • In addition to medical expense insurance, "health insurance" may also refer to insurance covering disability or long-term nursing or custodial care needs. (wikipedia.org)
  • Since people who lack health insurance are unable to obtain timely medical care, they have a 40% higher risk of death in any given year than those with health insurance, according to a study published in the American Journal of Public Health. (wikipedia.org)
  • Others, are often paid, at least in part, by employees-a notable example is medical insurance. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mercy Killers is a one-man show that details the consequences of a medical health-care catastrophe (breast cancer) in a family. (ascopost.com)
  • The primary reasons for these insurance programs were not payment of medical expenses, but income stabilization and protection of wage loss when sick. (ascopost.com)
  • 38% of the constitutions of the members of the United Nations guarantee medical care. (ascopost.com)
  • Societal Darwinism may have cast its long shadow over health care in the United States in the form of medical Darwinism (survival of the fittest), hence the acceptance of unequal health care or health care as an entitlement rather than a human right. (ascopost.com)
  • SPECIAL DISCOUNTS ON BULK QUANTITIES of Demos Medical Publishing books are available to corporations, professional associations, pharmaceutical companies, health care organizations, and other qualifying groups. (scribd.com)
  • Does the United States Need a Medical Revolution? (gothamcenter.org)
  • These allow regular people to obtain insurance despite having various medical conditions that might normally make them ineligible for coverage. (infobarrel.com)
  • People covered by the national programs are able to obtain required medical treatment as needed. (infobarrel.com)
  • Requires
  • The Privacy Rule does not preempt any state law that requires more privacy. (truth-out.org)
  • The FLSA requires that most employees in the United States be paid at least the federal minimum wage for all hours worked and overtime pay at time and one-half the regular rate of pay for all hours worked over 40 hours in a workweek. (wikipedia.org)
  • Specifies that nothing in this bill requires an individual to terminate coverage under a group health plan or any other form of health insurance coverage in which the individual was enrolled on the date of enactment (Sec. 1251). (votesmart.org)
  • Program
  • Provides for the eventual integration of the Indian Health Service into the Program and evaluation of the continued independence of Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) health programs. (wikipedia.org)
  • coverage
  • These funds (which may be run by public bodies, private for-profit companies, or private non-profit companies), must provide a minimum standard of coverage and are not allowed to discriminate between patients by charging different rates according to age, occupation, or previous health status. (wikipedia.org)
  • Universal health care is not one-size-fits-all and does not imply coverage for all people for everything. (wikipedia.org)
  • United Nations member states have agreed to work toward worldwide universal health coverage by 2030. (wikipedia.org)
  • In addition, universal health coverage was introduced in some Asian countries, including South Korea (1989), Taiwan (1995), Israel (1995), and Thailand (2001). (wikipedia.org)
  • Gallup issued a report in July 2014 stating that the uninsured rate for adults 18 and over declined from 18% in 2013 to 13.4% by in 2014, largely because there were new coverage options and market reforms under the Affordable Care Act. (wikipedia.org)
  • President Obama has announced details of a new American plan that will reduce the number of people who do not have adequate health care coverage. (infobarrel.com)
  • It will have the effect of lowering the number of people who live without health insurance coverage in the country. (infobarrel.com)
  • This will mean, however, that over 15 million people in the United States will still be without coverage. (infobarrel.com)
  • organizations
  • Allows nonprofit health maintenance organizations (HMOs) that deliver care in their own facilities to participate. (wikipedia.org)
  • Despite the white-glove ambitions of its owners, by the onset of the Depression the building housed a variety of immigrant and left-wing organizations, including the Communist-affiliated International Workers Order (IWO), a fraternal order offering low-cost health and life insurance. (gothamcenter.org)
  • government
  • To protect the interest of both patients and insurance companies, the government establishes an equalization pool to spread risks between the various funds. (wikipedia.org)
  • The government may also contribute to the equalization pool as a form of health care subsidy. (wikipedia.org)
  • For example, your supposedly protected health information is subject to disclosure without your authorization for research or for essential government functions. (truth-out.org)
  • Essential government functions may include assuring proper execution of a military missions [and] conducting intelligence and national security activities. (truth-out.org)
  • The public health insurance option, also known as the public insurance option or the public option, is a proposal to create a government-run health insurance agency that would compete with other private health insurance companies within the United States. (wikipedia.org)
  • In August 2009, the United Kingdom suspended the Turks and Caicos Islands' self-government following allegations of ministerial corruption. (wikipedia.org)
  • The government of the Republic of China announced its intention to donate US$1 million to a WHO health fund under the name Taiwan in April 2002. (wikipedia.org)
  • though the government applied as a "health entity," it did so under the name Taiwan. (wikipedia.org)
  • Pierce argued that the federal government should not commit itself to social welfare, which he stated was the responsibility of the states. (wikipedia.org)
  • provide
  • In return they would be expected to visit all those requesting help, be involved in public health and school work, attend midwifery cases and provide themselves with adequate transport. (wikipedia.org)
  • The extension of the United States Employment Service to provide jobs for demobilized military personnel. (wikipedia.org)
  • plan
  • The plan also imposes new restrictions on the ways that companies can do business in the health insurance sector. (infobarrel.com)
  • The plan to grant tax credits for insurance policy payments seeks to make such policies less expensive. (infobarrel.com)
  • Patients using the emergency rooms are not charged for the privilege, if they are enrolled in the public health care plan. (infobarrel.com)
  • Defines "qualified health plan" as a plan that meets certain criteria including, but not limited to, the following (Secs. (votesmart.org)
  • Sickness
  • Progressives campaigned unsuccessfully for sickness insurance guaranteed by the states. (wikipedia.org)
  • These late-19th-century and early-20th-century sickness insurance schemes were generally inexpensive for workers: their small scale and local administration kept overhead low, and because the people who purchased insurance were all employees of the same company, that prevented people who were already ill from buying in. (wikipedia.org)
  • programs
  • and (K) to facilitate linkages between other components of the national strategy to enhance workforce skills, including school-to-work transition, secondary and postsecondary vocational-technical education, and job training programs. (wikipedia.org)
  • During this time, individual hospitals began offering their own insurance programs, the first of which became Blue Cross. (wikipedia.org)
  • Many American politicians point at such situations and warn of the disasters that would result in the United States if such programs where adopted. (infobarrel.com)
  • normally
  • In the United States, the distinction between periodic salaries (which are normally paid regardless of hours worked) and hourly wages (meeting a minimum wage test and providing for overtime) was first codified by the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938. (wikipedia.org)
  • practice
  • It is part of religious law in Judaism and is an established practice in Islam, Coptic Christianity, and the Ethiopian Orthodox Church. (wikipedia.org)
  • The standards include national validation of the specific job functions in best practice work sites which when the job is completed successfully. (wikipedia.org)
  • supposedly
  • In one piece in late 2015, Pompeo criticized Republican presidential candidates who were supposedly "weak" on national security and intelligence collection. (blogspot.com)