• tissue
  • Soft tissue fistulas may occur secondary to endodontic disease. (akcchf.org)
  • Ca(OH) 2 is the most widely accepted material, due to its biological and antimicrobial properties, such as reparative dentin to bridge a pulp exposure, induction of hard tissue formation and ability to stimulate the formation of new bone, healing of large periradicular lesions and inhibition of root resorption [ 17 - 19 ]. (omicsonline.org)
  • However, when a new and different irritant was injected into the pouch, a violent reaction, leading to tissue necrosis, occurred. (scribd.com)
  • However, when endodontic therapy is performed, new irritants in the form of medicaments, irrigating solutions, or chemically altered tissue proteins may be introduced into the granulomatous lesion. (scribd.com)
  • 4) have indicated that endodontic therapy may also cause a change in the periapical tissue pressure. (scribd.com)
  • Dental pulp, which is a richly vascularized and innervated tissue, is enclosed by tissues, such as dentin, which are incapable of expanding. (wikipedia.org)
  • All of these characteristics severely constrain the defensive capacity of the pulp tissue when faced with the different aggressions to which it may be subjected. (wikipedia.org)
  • This may lead to ischemia (lack of oxygen) and necrosis (tissue death). (wikipedia.org)
  • The pulp contains the blood vessels the nerves and connective tissue inside a tooth and provides the tooth's blood and nutrients. (wikipedia.org)
  • A pulpotomy is the removal of a portion of the pulp, including the diseased aspect, with the intent of maintaining the vitality of the remaining pulpal tissue by means of a therapeutic dressing. (wikipedia.org)
  • A healthy tooth has a space inside it called the "pulp space" which is filled with soft tissues - nerves, blood vessels, and pink connective tissue. (wikipedia.org)
  • Its mechanism of action is the cauterization of the pulp tissue. (wikipedia.org)
  • It creates a superficial zone of coagulation or necrosis that remains compatible with the underlying tissue and isolates the pulp from vigorous effects of the sub-base. (wikipedia.org)
  • retreatment
  • Your endodontic colleague can be a wonderful resource in the evaluation process when considering whether retreatment is warranted before restoration. (docplayer.net)
  • cavity
  • Generally, when evaluating a tooth with endodontic and/or periapical disease, the focus should be on structural defects at its crown and root apex, the width of its pulp cavity, and the appearance of the periapical tissues. (merckvetmanual.com)
  • When the pulp becomes inflamed, pressure begins to build up in the pulp cavity, exerting pressure on the nerve of the tooth and the surrounding tissues. (wikipedia.org)
  • Unlike other parts of the body where pressure can dissipate through the surrounding soft tissues, the pulp cavity is very different. (wikipedia.org)
  • A temporary filling is used to keep the material in place, and about 6 months later, the cavity is re-opened and hopefully there is now enough sound dentin over the pulp (a "dentin bridge") that any residual softened dentin can be removed and a permanent filling can be placed. (wikipedia.org)
  • lesion
  • pulpal exposures were initiated in both normal and germ-free rats, and while no pathologic changes were exhibited in the mouths of the germ-free rats, introduction of the normal oral microbial flora produced pulpal necrosis and led to periradicular lesion formation in the normal rats. (wikipedia.org)
  • enamel
  • Extrinsic stains can become internalised through enamel defects or cracks or as a result of dentine becoming exposed but most extrinsic stains appear to be deposited on or in the dental pellicle. (wikipedia.org)
  • Alternatively the tooth may become darker without pulp necrosis Enamel hypoplasia Hyperemia Fluorosis Dentinogenesis imperfecta Amelogenesis imperfecta Tetracycline and minocycline. (wikipedia.org)
  • occurs
  • The exact causes of pulp obliteration are unclear but it typically occurs in response to dental trauma, especially following luxation injuries involving displacement, particularly if a tooth is replanted after being completely avulsed (knocked out) This response is common in this scenario and typically starts to occur several months after replantation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Over several months the pulp becomes necrotic and the animal is no longer painful until an inflammatory reaction occurs around the apex of the tooth at which time the animal becomes painful again. (akcchf.org)
  • dentin-pulp complex
  • Toothache may be caused by dental (odontogenic) conditions (such as those involving the dentin-pulp complex or periodontium), or by non-dental (non-odontogenic) conditions (such as maxillary sinusitis or angina pectoris). (wikipedia.org)
  • Consequently, pain originating from the dentin-pulp complex tends to be poorly localized, whereas pain from the periodontal ligament will typically be well localized, although not always. (wikipedia.org)
  • dentistry
  • The UAB School of Dentistry is the ideal launching pad for that progression of your vocation in dental Health care. (pages10.com)
  • Sedation dentistry refers back to the usage of sedation in the course of dental cure. (pages10.com)
  • 9 An observational, retrospective survey (344) of dental sheets Conservative clinic Aden Faculty of Dentistry March to May 2010. (slideplayer.com)
  • It is a common procedure in cosmetic dentistry, and a number of different techniques are used by dental professionals. (wikipedia.org)
  • vitality
  • Dental pulp sensibility testing should not be confused with pulp-vitality tests, such as laser Doppler flowmetry and/or pulse oximetry. (wikipedia.org)
  • Since pulp capping is not always successful in maintaining the vitality of the pulp, the dentist will usually keep the status of the tooth under review for about 1 year after the procedure. (wikipedia.org)
  • decay
  • At this age , dental decay of molars and incisors may already develop more frequently. (dentisty.org)
  • It is one of a number of biologically orientated strategies for managing dental decay. (wikipedia.org)
  • Biologically orientated strategies for managing dental decay are considered by their proponents to have advantages for child patients receiving dental care as the techniques are less invasive and often avoid having to use local anaesthesia and drilling. (wikipedia.org)
  • radicular
  • In cases where root formation is incomplete (as during adolescent years), a partial pulpotomy may keep radicular pulp vital long enough to allow the roots to develop fully. (wikipedia.org)
  • alteration
  • A violent reaction may follow, leading to liquefaction necrosis, indicative of an alteration of the local adaptation syndrome. (scribd.com)
  • tissues
  • Cariousness at this age is caused by the developmental defect of hard dental tissues composition and by an inappropriate diet (sweet drinks at night, a pacifier with honey). (dentisty.org)
  • Changes in the thickness of the dental hard tissues would result in intrinsic discolouration. (wikipedia.org)
  • sensibility
  • Signs and symptoms of obliteration include: Yellow tooth discoloration Lack or response to pulp sensibility test (e.g. ethyl chloride, electric pulp test) Lack of visible radiolucency where pulp system should be on radiographs (x-rays) Most of the time this condition is painless and is managed conservatively by monitoring the tooth with routine radiographs. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dental pulp sensibility testing can either be done by thermal or electrical means in order to assess health of the dental pulp, according to the sensory response. (wikipedia.org)
  • toothache
  • Toothache is the most common type of orofacial pain and, when severe, it is considered a dental emergency, since there may be a significant impact on sleep, eating, and other daily activities. (wikipedia.org)
  • There are many possible non-dental causes, but the vast majority of toothache is dental in origin. (wikipedia.org)
  • defects
  • In pulp perfusion studies, CaOH has shown to insufficiently seal all dentinal tubules, and presence of tunnel defects (patent communications within reparative dentine connecting pulp and exposure sites) indicate a potential for microleakage when CaOH is used. (wikipedia.org)